Table of contents for Fundamentals of case management practice : skills for the human services / Nancy Summers.


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Section 1     Foundations for Best Practice
in Case Management
Chapter 1     Ethics and Other Professional Responsibilities
for Human Service Workers  1
Introduction  1
Dual Relationships  2
Value Conflicts  5
Clients' Rights  9
Privileged Communication  18
Diagnostic Labeling  21
Involuntary Commitment  22
Ethical Responsibility  23
Stealing from Clients  26
Competence    27
Responsibility to Your Colleagues and the Profession  28
Professional Responsibility  30
Summary    31
Exercises: Ethics  31
Exercises: Ethically, What Went Wrong?  34
Exercise: Decide on the Best Course of Action  38
Chapter 2     Case Management: Definition and Responsibilities  39
Introduction  39
A History of Case Management  40
Why Case Management?    40
What Is an Individualized Plan?  41
Assessment   42
Planning   44
Linking   48
Monitoring   49
Service Coordination  49
Levels of Case Management  52
Separating Case Management from Therapy  55
Case Management in Provider Agencies  56
Managed Care and Case Management  57
Underlying Principles: Hope and Self-Determination  58
Generic Case Management  62
Summary    63
Exercises: Case Management  63
Exercises: Decide on the Best Course of Action  67
Chapter 3    Applying the Ecological Model: A Theoretical Foundation
for Human Services  69
Introduction  69
Seeking a Balanced View of the Client  70
The Three Levels   72
Looking at What the Person Brings  72
Looking at What the Context Brings  73
Developmental Transitions  74
Developing the Interventions  75
Working with the Generalist Approach  76
Larger Interventions  77
Summary    77
Exercise: Looking at Florence's Problem on Three Levels  77
Exercises: Designing Three Levels of Intervention  79
Section 2 Useful Clarifications and Attitudes
Chapter 4     Cultural Competence  83
Introduction  83
Where Are the Differences?  84
Strangers  86
Anxiety and Uncertainty  87
Thoughtless Versus Thoughtful Communication  89
Dimensions of Culture  92
Obstacles to Understanding  98
Competence    100
Summary    102
Exercises: Testing Your Cultural Competence  102
Chapter 5    Attitudes and Boundaries  105
Introduction  105
Understanding Attitudes  105
Basic Helping Attitudes  106
Reality  109
How Clients Are Discouraged  109
Understanding Boundaries  112
Seeing Yourself and the Client as Completely Separate Individuals  112
Erecting Detrimental Boundaries  113
Transference and Countertransference  114
Summary    115
Exercises: Demonstrating Warmth, Genuineness, and Empathy  116
Exercises: Recognizing the Difference-Encouragement or
Discouragement   120
Exercises: Blurred Boundaries  120
Chapter 6     Clarifying Who Owns the Problem  123
Introduction  123
If the Client Owns the Problem  124
If You Own the Problem  127
If You Both Own the Problem  127
Summary    128
Exercises: Who Owns the Problem?  129
Exercises: Making the Strategic Decision  131
Section 3 Effective Communication
Chapter 7     Identifying Good Responses and Poor Responses  135
Introduction  135
Twelve Roadblocks to Communication  136
Useful Responses  140
Summary    148
Exercises: Identifying Roadblocks  148
Chapter 8     Listening and Responding  151
Introduction  151
Defining Reflective Listening  152
Responding to Feelings  152
Responding to Content  156
Positive Reasons for Reflective Listening  158
Points to Remember  158
Summary    160
Exercise: How Many Feelings Can You Name?  160
Exercises: Finding the Right Feeling  160
Exercises: Reflective Listening  161
Chapter 9    Asking Questions   167
Introduction  167
When Questions Are Important  168
Closed Questions  168
Open Questions   168
Questions that Make the Client Feel Uncomfortable  170
A Formula for Asking Open Questions  171
Summary    173
Exercises: What Is Wrong with These Questions?  174
Exercises: Which Question Is Better?  176
Exercises: Opening Closed Questions  176
Exercises: Try Asking Questions  179
Chapter 10    Bringing Up Difficult Issues  181
Introduction  181
When to Use Confrontation  182
The I-Message in Confrontation  183
The Rules for Confrontation  184
Asking Permission to Share Ideas  188
Confronting Collaterals  189
On Not Becoming Overbearing  189
Summary    191
Exercises: What Is Wrong Here?  191
Exercises: Expressing Your Concern  193
Exercises: Expressing a Stronger Message  195
Chapter 11    Addressing and Disarming Anger  197
Introduction  197
Common Reasons for Anger   197
Why Disarming Anger Is Important  198
Avoiding the Number-One Mistake  199
Erroneous Expectations for Perfect Communication  200
The Four-Step Process  201
What You Do Not Want to Do   203
Look for Useful Information  205
Managing an Angry Outburst  205
Summary     206
Exercises: Initial Responses to Anger  206
Exercises: Practicing Disarming  207
Chapter 12    The Effective Combination of Skills  209
Introduction  209
Combining Skills and Attitudes  210
Communication Skills That Facilitate Change  211
Trapping the Client  216
From Adversarial to Collaborative  217
Case Manager Traps   219
Summary     222
Chapter 13    Putting It All Together  223
Introduction  223
Exercises: Putting It All Together  223
Section 4 Meeting Clients and Assessing Their Strengths
and Needs
Chapter 14    Documenting Initial Inquiries  231
Introduction  231
Guidelines for Filling Out Forms  232
Steps for Filling Out the New Referral or Inquiry Form  232
Steps for Preparing the Verification of Appointment Form  236
Summary     237
Exercise: Intake of a Middle-Aged Adult  238
Exercise: Intake of a Child  238
Exercise: Intake of an Infirm, Older Person  238
Chapter 15    The First Interview  241
Introduction  241
Your Role   241
The Client's Understanding  242
Preparing for the First Interview  242
Your Office  243
Meeting the Client  244
Taking Notes   245
Collecting the Information  245
Asking for More Clarification  245
What Information to Collect  246
Client Expectations  246
Social Histories and Forms  247
Wrapping Up    247
The Client Leaves   248
Summary     248
Chapter 16    Social Histories and Assessment Forms  249
Introduction  249
What Is a Social History?  250
Layout of the Social History  250
How to Ask What You Need to Know   251
Capturing the Details  257
Who Took the Social History  258
Social Histories in Other Settings  258
Writing Brief Social Histories  262
Using an Assessment Form  266
Taking Social Histories on a Computer  267
The Next Step    267
Summary     268
Exercises: Practice with Social Histories  268
Exercises: Assessment of a Middle-Aged Adult  269
Exercises: Assessment of a Child  269
Exercises: Assessment of an Infirm, Older Person  270
Exercise: Creating a File  271
Chapter 17    Using the DSM    273
Introduction  273
Background Information  275
Using the DSM    278
Making the Code   284
Summary     286
Exercises: Using the DSM  287
Chapter 18    The Mental Status Examination  291
Introduction  291
What to Observe   292
How to Observe   292
Documenting Your Observations  292
Mental Status Examination Outline  293
Summary     309
Exercises: Using the MSE Vocabulary  310
Chapter 19    Receiving and Releasing Information  313
Introduction  313
Sending for Information  313
If You Release Information  313
Directions for Using Release Forms  314
Examples of the Release Forms  316
When the Client Wants You to Release Information  317
When the Material Is Received  318
Summary     319
Exercise: Send for Information Related to a Middle-Aged Adult  319
Exercise: Send for Information Related to a Child  319
Exercise: Send for Information Related to a Frail, Older Person  319
Exercise: Maintaining Your Charts  319
Chapter 20    Facilitating a Meaningful Change and Recovery  321
Introduction  321
How People Do Not Change or Recover  322
What Is Change?   322
What Is Recovery?  323
Physical Health Is Part of Wellness  324
Self-Determination  324
Relationships that Support Recovery  324
Encouragement as Part of Recovery  326
Stages of Change  330
A Case History  331
Ambivalence and Reluctance  333
Rolling with Resistance  333
Summary    334
Exercises: Helping People Change  335
Section 5 Developing a Plan with the Client
Chapter 21    Developing a Service Plan at the Case Management Unit  337
Introduction  337
Involving the Client and the Family  338
Using the Assessment  339
Creating the Treatment or Service Plan  340
How to Identify the Client's Strengths  341
Individualized Planning  342
Sample Goal Plan  343
Summary    346
Exercises: Broad Goal Planning  346
Chapter 22    Preparing for a Service Planning Conference or Disposition
Planning Meeting   349
Introduction  349
What You Will Need to Bring to the Meeting  350
Goals for the Meeting  350
Preparing to Present Your Case  351
Making the Presentation  352
Collaboration  354
Follow-Up to Meeting  354
Summary    355
Exercises: Planning  355
Chapter 23    Making the Referral and Assembling the Record  357
Introduction  357
Determining Dates  358
Sample Referral Notification Form  359
The Face Sheet   359
Summary    362
Exercises: Assembling the Record  363
Chapter 24    Documentation and Recording   365
Introduction  365
Writing Contact Notes  366
Labeling the Contact  367
Documenting Service Monitoring  367
Documentation: The Finishing Touches  368
Government Requirements   371
Do Not Be Judgmental   372
Distinguish Between Facts and Impressions  372
Give a Balanced Picture of Your Client  373
Provide Evidence of Agreement  373
Making Changes to the Plan  373
Summary    374
Exercises: Recording Your Meeting with the Client  374
Exercises: Recording Client Contacts  375
Exercises: Using Government Guidelines to Correct Errors  380
Exercises: Spotting Recording Errors  381
Section 6 Monitoring Services and Following the Client
Chapter 25    Monitoring the Services or Treatment  383
Introduction  383
What Is Monitoring?  384
Purpose of Monitoring  384
Collaboration  386
Leave the Office  386
Responding to a Crisis  387
Follow-Up   388
Summary    388
Chapter 26    Developing Goals and Objectives at the Provider Agency  391
Introduction  391
Client Participation/Collaboration  392
Expect Positive Outcomes  392
Writing the Goals  393
Objectives  394
Combining Goals and Treatment Objectives  394
Finishing Touches  396
Summary    398
Exercises: Developing Goals and Objectives  400
Chapter 27    Terminating the Case  407
Introduction  407
A Successful Termination  408
The Discharge Summary   410
Summary     413
Exercises: Termination of a Middle-Aged Adult  413
Exercises: Termination of a Child  414
Exercises: Termination of a Frail, Older Person  414
Chapter 28    Taking Care of Yourself  415
Introduction  415
See Yourself as an Effective Tool  415
While Attempting to Understand Others, Don't Fail to Understand
Yourself  416
Consistently Underestimating Clients Wears Workers Out  417
Develop Healthy Relationships Away from the Agency  420
Develop Other Stimulating and Rewarding Interests  421
Summary    421
Appendix A    Wildwood Case Management Unit Forms   423
Arrangement of the Client's Chart  423
Face Sheet   424
New Referral or Inquiry  425
Verification of Appointment  426
Request/Release of Information  427
Release of HIV/AIDS-Related Information  428
Intake Assessment Form  429
Peer Support Services Referral Form  436
Peer Support Mutual Agreements Plan/Outcome Report and Renewal  437
Planning Conference Notes  441
Treatment or Goal Plan  442
Referral Notification Form  444
Contact Notes  445
Contact Notes: Children's Case Management Services  446
Discharge Summary   447
Appendix B   Work Samples    449
Examples of Progress Notes or Contact Notes  449
Dating Your Forms  451
Sample Cases with Service Plans  453
Appendix C    Grading the Final Files  455
References   458
Index   460



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Social case work Problems, exercises, etc, Social work education, Social service Problems, exercises, etc