Table of contents for Leibniz : metaphilosophy and metaphysics, 1666-1686 / Andreas Blank.


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Chapter 1 Dalgarno, Wilkins and Leibniz        23
1.1. Introduction 23
1.2. Leibniz and the Descriptive Nature of
Metaphysical Concepts 24
1.3. Dalgarno, Wilkins, and the Descriptive Nature
of Metaphysical Concepts 28
1.4. Leibniz's Response to Dalgarno and
Wilkins 32
1.5. Conclusion 38
Chapter 2 Definitions, Sorites-Arguments,
and Justice                41
2.1. Introduction 41
2.2. Viotti and Leibniz on Analysis 43
2.3. Definitions and Justice 48
2.4. Sorites-Arguments and Justice 54
2.5. Conclusion 56
Chapter 3 Ether, Mind, and Pneuma            61
3.1. Introduction 61
3.2. Prime Matter, Ether, and Pneuma 64
3.3. Analysis and the Nature of Mind 69
3.4. Analysis and the Nature of Matter 75
3.5. Conclusion 80
Chapter 4 Confused Perception and
the Union of Soul and Body     85
4.1. Introduction 85
4.2. The Co-extension of Soul and Body 86
4.3. Souls and Vital Spirits 90
4.4. The Emergence of a Theory of
Corporeal Substances 94
4.5. Conclusion100
Chapter 5 Substance Monism and
Substance Pluralism           105
5.1. Introduction 105
5.2. Substance Monism and Substance
Pluralism, 1668-72 106
5.3. Substance Monism and Substance
Pluralism in the De Summa Rerum I11
5.4. Disambiguating
the Concept of Substance 116
5.5. Conclusion 118
Chapter 6 The Response to Spinoza            121
6.1. Introduction 121
6.2. Leibniz's Diachronic Analysis of
Reflection 122
6.3. Spinoza's Synchronic Analysis of
Ideas of Ideas 126
6.4. Leibniz's Response to Spinoza 132
6.5. Conclusion 133
Chapter 7 Striving Possibles and the
Cognitivist Theory of Volition   137
7.1. Introduction 137
7.2. Possibility as a Descriptive Concept 138
7.3. Human Action and the Cognitivist Theory
of Volition 143
7.4. Divine Action and the Cognitivist Theory
of Volition 150
7.5. Conclusion 154
Chapter 8 Rules as Instruments               159
8.1. Introduction 159
8.2. Rules and Instruments 160
8.3. Figures, Models, and Mathematical
Calculi 166
8.4. Measures, Examples, and Metaphysical
Concepts 169
8.5. Conclusion 173
Appendix The Emergence of the Logical
Conception of Substance        177



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm, Freiherr von, 1646-1716 Contributions in metaphysics, Metaphysics, Metafysica, gttMethodologie, gtt