Table of contents for Desert dust in the global system / A.S. Goudie, N.J. Middleton.


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I The Nature and Importance of Dust Storms
11  introduction.... . .. ... . . .......         .  .         1
1.2 Methods of Study, . . ..                                   6
S    t Entrainment, Transport and Deposition
2.1  I troduction  ...  .  ......    .     . ..   . . . . .13
2.2 The Origin of Desert Dust Particles ..                   13
3 Threshold Velocities and Environments of Deflation ... ....   17
24 Wind Erosion of Soil and Other Surface Materials........ ...  19
.5 Synoptic Meteorological Conditions Leading to Dust Events ... .. 22
26  Long-Range Transport  .  . . ..... ...  . . . .. .   .    27
2.7  Wet and Dry Deposition  ...... .... ..  .....       .    30
28 The Giant' Dust Particle Conundrum . .............   .     31
3  nvironmental and Human Consequences
I3   Introduction  .  . .  .  ..  .    .. .....    .    ...   33
3.2 Mrine Ecosystems                                         33
33    o Aeolian Erosion of Soils                              35
4 Aeoian Contamination of Soils .                            35
'5 Stone Pavements ...                                        38
u Dn rusts ..                  ......
7 Sainiation and Acidity                                  40
3.8 Desert Depressions and Yardangs .. . ..    ....     .     42
9 Dust and Radiative Forcing .                               45
10 Dust and Atmospheric CO ..     .      ...               .6
11 Dust and Tropospheri Ozone ..   ...... 4
312  Dust and  louds  ....... ... . . ..  ....   .         .  48
"313  Economic Effects . ....    .  ..  . ....    .....     .  49
3,14  Health  .... ............................................... .  5 1
13.15 Dust Storms in War ..                                   53
4  The Global Picture
41  Introduction  . ... .    . . ..   .. .   . . .. . .. .
S   Major Global Sources.  ...   . ..  ..  .. .  .            5
Dust Storms anid Rainfall .. .. .. 59
4.4 Vegetation and Dry Lake Beds ...... ......            .   62
SDiurnal and Seasonal Timing of Dust Sto ....................... 63
6   Duration of Dust Storms  . .... .... .   ... . ..  ..   ..    68
--a-                                          6
7   Dust Storms on Mars ..                                      68
e Regional Picture
.1    Introduction . . .  ..... .  ... . ..  . .. .. . ..0.4.....  71
5.2  North  America. . . . . . . . . . . .  ..  . .. . .. . . ..  . .....  . . .. .... ..  . ...... .  71
3   South  America. .. ................... .............. ....... .  76
5.4  Southern  Afrca  ............  ....  ... ... . ....... ...  .   .
STrajecories of Saharan Dust Transport ............... 90
"5.  South  West Asia.  ...  .  . . .  . .... . ....  . . ...  .. .. ...  . ........... .   1 7
v c     sa                                                 117
9   Centra  Asia and  the Former USSR  ................... .  ......   133
5 0  China  .. .. . -..............................................  135
1  ongolia .. 141
2 Trajectories o Dust Transport om China and Mongola ......... 41
3    Australia  ............................................ ..... .  142
Ssts Concentrations, Accumulation and Constituents
6.1  Dust Contents of Air ....S .  ..i........                      147
2  Dust eposition and Accumulation.........        ....    ..    149
3   Particle Sizes  . . ..  . ....  ....  . . . . ..   . ..      157
61i   in161
.4   Dust  Chem istry  ........... ......... ................. ... .  .  1 1
5  ClaMineralog of Du  .. 164
hanging Frequencies of Dust Storms
i  ntrduction. .  .. .  ...                                    167
2  e United States Dust Bowl .. 167
196
7.4  Saharan  Dust Events  . . .               .... .  .  ..  . . . . .  . . . .. .. .. ...... . .  174
.5  Russia  and  its Neighbours  ...  . .  .... . ...  . ..  . . . .. ....... . .. .  . . .....  181
.9  The Aeolian Envi ronmen t in a Warmer World ................. 190
8  ust Storm Contro
8I  I roduction  .. .... .. .  .      ..  ..  . . n. . .  .. . . .  .  193
.4  oM ,chanica N M et' od. . .s . ......................................  198
8.5  Miscelaneous Methods to Reduce Dust Emissions .............. ..  199
Quaternary Dust Loadings
9 1  [ntroduction  .  .  ....... ................ .               201
9.   Ocean  Cores .. .. ... ...... ..            .    .. .   . .   201
9,3  Dust Deposition as Recorded in Ice Cores ......     ....      205
9.4  Loess Accumulation Rates                                    . 20
10   Introd ctios                                                   21
(P  rtharan Loss                                                 216
1 3  Central Asian  Loss ... .  .. .  .  ...... ...   ..  .       219
0.4  Chinese Loss  . . ... .   ..          ..   .. ... ..      .    220
0.5  Conclusions  ............................................... .  225



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Dust storms, Dust storms Environmental aspects