Table of contents for Boronic acids in saccharide recognition / Tony D. James, Marcus D. Phillips, Seiji Shinkai.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog
Note: Electronic data is machine generated. May be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
hapter 2 The Molecular Recognition of Saccharides              3
2.1 Molecular Recognition                             3
2.2 The Importance of Saccharides                     4
2 2.1 Saccharides and Carbohydrates              4
2.2.2 Diabetes Mellitus                          5
2.2.3 Structure of Saccharides                   5
2.2.4 Home Blood Glucose Monitoring              7
2.3 Non-Boronic Acid Appended Synthetic Sensors for
Saccharides                                      9
hapter 3 Complexation of Boronic Acids with Saccharides       13
3.1 A Brief History                                  13
3 1.1 Early Work                                13
311.2 Boronic Acid - Diol Complexation          14
3.2 Acidity and the O-B-O Bond Angle                 17
3.2.1  -B-O Bond Angle Contraction              17
3.2.2 Orbital Interpretation                    20
3.2.3 Computational Analysis                    20
3.3 Complex Formation and Dependence on pH           21
33.1  Empirical Data                            21
3.3.2 Proton Transfer                           22
3.3.3 Effect of Altering the Ligand             24
3.3.4 Effect of Altering the Boron Acid         24
3.3.5 Deuterium Isotope Effect                  25
3.3.6 Computational Analysis                    25
3.3.7 Reactions with Tetrahedral Borates         27
3.3,8  Pentavalent Coordination at Boron         29
3.3.9 Complex Formation and B-O Bond Length
Dependence                                 29
3.3.10 B-O Bond Length and Acidification         30
3.4  Binding Constants and the Influence of Lewis Bases  31
Chapter 4  Fluorescent Sensors                                  34
4.1 The Application of Fluorescence n Sensing        34
4.2 Photoexcitation and Subsequent Relaxation        35
43 Excited State Internal Charge Transfer (ICT)      36
4.3.1 Solvent Relaxation                         36
4.3.2 Dual Fluorescence                          7
4 3.3  Excited State Twisted Internal Charge
Transfer (TICT)                            38
4.4  Fluorescent internal Charge Transfer (ICT) Sensory
Systems                                          40
4.4 1 Early Fluorescent Sensors for Saccharides  40
44.2  Fluorescent Internal Charge Transfer Sensors
Incorporating the ortho-(Aminomethyl)phe-
nylboronic Acid Fragment                   48
4.5 Excited State Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET)  50
4. 51 Electron Transfer (ET)                     50
4.5.2 The Mechanistic Interpretation of PET      52
46   Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) Sensory
Systems                                          53
4.6.1 Diboronic cid Sensory Systems with
Selectivity for Specific Saccharides       55
4.7 Ditopic Sensors                                  62
4.   Other Fluorescent Sensors                       67
4.9 Amine Boron (N B) Interactions
4. 0 The Importance of Pyranose to Furanose
interconversion                                  75
4 10.1 Pyranose to Furanose Interconversion as a
Function of Time and Water                75
4.i0.2 The Preference of Monoboronic Acids for
D-Fructose.                               77
4.10.3 Disaccharides                             79
4. 11 Summary                                        82
hapter 5  Modular Fluorescent Sensors                           84
5.1  The Design Rationale                            84
5.2 Modular Systems                                  87
5.2.1 Linker Dependence                          87
5.2.2  Linker Dependence and Disaccharides         91
5.3  Energy Transfer Systems                            95
5.4  Fluorophore Dependence in Modular Systems          98
5.4 1 Inference                                   102
5.5  Other Approaches                                  107
5.5.1 Wang and Co-workers                         107
5 5.2  Hall and Co-workers                        108
5.6  Summary                                           110
Capter 6  Other Types of Sensor                                   I11
6.1 Colorimetric Sensors                               111
6.2  Electrochemical Sensors                           118
6.3  Assay Systems                                     119
6.4  Polymer and Surface Bound Sensors                 125
6.5  Odds and Ends                                     129
(hapter 7  Other Systems for Saccharide Recognition               130
7.   Receptors at the Air Water Interface              130
7.2  Transport and Extraction                          I31
7.3  CD Receptors                                      134
7.3.1 Homogeneous Systems                         135
7.3.2  Heterogeneous and Polymeric Systems        142
7.4  Molecular Imprinting                              145



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Saccharides