Table of contents for Handbook of instructional communication : rhetorical and relational perspectives / [edited by] Timothy P. Mottet, Virginia P. Richmond, James C. McCroskey.


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UNIT I * Foundations           1
1   Foundations of Instructional Communication         3
Introduction   3
Interdisciplinary Foundations of Instructional Communication  7
Educational Psychology: An Emphasis on the Learner  7
Pedagogy: An Emphasis on the Teacher  10
Communication: An Emphasis on the Meaning of Messages  12
Interdisciplinary Contributions to Instructional Communication  16
Educational Psychology: Student Affective Learning  17
Pedagogy: Teacher Self-Perceptions  21
Instructional Communication: Examining Rhetorical
and Relational Processes  22
Instructional Communication as a Rhetorical Communication Process  23
Instructional Communication as a Relational Communication Process  24
Summary     27
References   27
2   Instructional Communication: The Historical
Perspective    33
Introduction   33
Origins and History of Instructional Communication  35
Development of the Professional Area  35
Development of Instructional Communication Scholarship  36
The West Virginia University Influence  38
The Future of Instructional Communication  40
Continued Growth    41
Increased Attention to Technologically Mediated Instructional
Communication    41
Increased Culture-Centered Instructional Communication Research  42
Improving the Measurementof Cognitive Learning  44
Improving Models for Instructional Communication Research  45
Applications of the Communibiological Paradigm  46
References   46
UNIT II * Rhetorical Perspectives            49
3   Understanding the Audience: Students'
Communication Traits        51
Introduction    51
Student Orientations Toward Communicating     52
Reticence   53
Shyness    53
Willingness to Communicate  54
Self-Perceived Communication Competence (SPCC)  55
Communication Apprehension    55
Public Speaking Anxiety (PSA)  56
Compulsive Communication    57
Receiver Apprehension  58
Effects of Communication Traits in the Classroom  58
Primary Effects  58
Secondary Effects  60
Causes of Communication Traits   61
Implications    62
References   64
4   Understanding the Source: Teacher Credibility
and Aggressive Communication Traits         67
Introduction    67
Development of the Measurement of Teacher Credibility  68
Study #1: McCroskey, Holdridge, and Toomb (1974)  69
Study #2: McCroskey and Young (1981)  71
Study #3: Teven and McCroskey (1997)  72
Teacher Credibility and Teacher Aggressive
Communication Traits     74
Aggressive Communication    75
Classroom Studies   76
Knowledge Claims      82
Directions for Future Research  83
References    85
5   Instructional Message Variables        89
Introduction    89
Content Relevance    90
Overview of Content Relevance  90
The Study of Relevance in Instructional
Communication Research    92
Knowledge Claims    94
Directions for Future Research  94
Teacher Clarity   95
Overview of Teacher Clarity  95
The Ohio State Studies  95
Research on Lecture Cues and Notetaking  96
The Chesebro and McCroskey Studies  98
Knowledge Claims     100
Directions for Future Research  101
Instructional Humor     101
Overview of Instructional Humor  102
Operationalization of Instructional Humor  103
Appropriateness of Instructional Humor  105
Effectiveness of Instructional Humor  107
Instructional Humor and Individual Differences  108
Knowledge Claims     110
Directions for Future Research  111
Summary      112
References    112
6   Teachers'Influence Messages        117
Introduction    117
Power as a Relational Phenomenon     118
Seminal Research on Teacher Influence  120
Continuing Research on Teacher Influence  125
Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) Influence  126
Student Perceptions of Student and Teacher Influence  128
Cross-Cultural Studies Examining Teacher Influence  130
Knowledge Claims      132
Directions for Future Research  134
Summary      136
References    136
UNIT III * Relational Perspectives             141
7   Students'Influence Messages        143
Introduction    144
Rationale for Examining Students' Influence Messages  145
The Student-Teacher Communication Process Is Transactional  145
Student Influence Messages Affect Learning  146
Student Influence Messages Affect Teacher Self-Perceptions  146
Review of Student-Centered Instructional Communication Research    147
How Student Communication Traits Influence Teachers  148
How Student Nonverbal Immediacy Influences Teachers  150
How Student Verbal and Nonverbal Responsiveness
Influences Teachers  152
How Students and Teachers Influence Each Other  154
Knowledge Claims     156
What Do We Know?     156
What Are the Implications for Teachers and Students?  157
Directions for Future Research  159
Summary      162
References    162
8 Teacher Immediacy and the Teacher-Student
Relationship      167
Introduction    168
Overview of the Immediacy Construct    169
Origins of the Immediacy Research Program   171
Contemporary Research on Immediacy in Instruction   173
The Importance of Immediacy to the Teacher-Student
Relationship   173
The Cognitive Learning Problem  174
The Cognitive Learning Results  176
Explaining Immediacy's Impact    179
Arousal-Attention Explanation  179
Motivation Explanation  179
Special Concerns   181
Immediacy and Affinity  181
Culture and Immediacy   182
Immediacy and Training   183
Knowledge Claims     184
Directions for Future Research  185
Summary      188
References    189
9 Teacher and Student Affinity-Seeking
in the Classroom      195
Introduction    195
Overview of the Affinity-Seeking Construct  196
Teachers' Use of Affinity-Seeking Strategies  199
Students' Use of Affinity-Seeking Strategies  204
Knowledge Claims     205
Directions for Future Research  207
Summary      209
References   210
10    College Teacher Misbehaviors       213
Introduction    213
Rationale for Examining Teacher Misbehaviors   214
Origins of the Research Program   215
Theoretical Perspectives Guiding the Research  219
Attribution Theory  219
Norm Violations Model   224
Related Studies   227
Knowledge Claims     230
Directions for Future Research  232
References    233
11    Student Incivility and Resistance in the Classroom      235
Introduction    235
Why Study Student Incivility and Resistance?  236
What Does the Research Tell Us?   238
Student Incivilities and Misbehaviors  238
Student Resistance  240
Factors Influencing Resistance  241
Knowledge Claims     248
Directions for Research  249
References    250
UNIT IV    * Theory and Assessment            253
12    Theorizing About Instructional Communication           255
Introduction    255
Essential Elements of Theory Development   256
What Variables, Constructs, and Concepts Should Be Included?  256
How Are These Variables, Constructs, and Concepts Related?  257
Why Are These Variables, Constructs, and Concepts Related?  257
Current State of Instructional Communication Theory Development   258
New Directions for Instructional Communication Theory Development   260
Emotional Response Theory   260
Rhetorical/Relational Goal Theory  265
Relational Power and Instructional Influence Theory  271
Summary      277
References    278
13    Assessing Instructional Communication         283
Introduction    283
Using the Rhetorical and Relational Perspectives  285
Evaluating Instructional Communication Practices   285
Assessing Rhetorical Communication Behaviors  286
Assessing Relational Communication Behaviors  289
Evaluating Instructional Communication Outcomes     292
Assessing Student Outcomes  297
Assessing Teacher Outcomes  299
Instructional Communication Caveats    302
Effective Instructors Have Increased Communication Demands  303
Effective Instructors Are Misperceived  304



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Communication in education, Teacher-student relationships, Interaction analysis in education