Table of contents for First globalization : the Eurasian exchange, 1500 to 1800 / Geoffrey C. Gunn.


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Preface                                                     ix
Acknowledgments                                              xi
Glossary                                                    xiii
List of Illustrations                                      xvii
Introduction                                                 1
First Globalization 2 / Oriental Texts and the Rise of the European Canon 4 / 
Eurocentricity versus the Eurasian Exchange 6 / Eurasia as Region 8 / The Southeast Asia
Region? 10 / Defining the Eurasian Maritime World
System 11 / The Book 13
1 The Discovery Canon                                      17
Medieval Travelers 17 / The Iberian Discovery Literature
20 / The Portuguese Histories 23 / The Great European
Collections 25 / Arab-Iberian Crossovers 30 / The Varenius
Revolution in Geography 32 / Conclusion 34
2 Historical Confabulators and Literary Geographers         37
Constructions of Europe and the Literary Classics 38 /
Tradition of the Fantastic 40 / Fantastic Science 42 / The
Prester John Myth? 45 / Literary Utopias 47 / Terra
Australis Incognita 50 / Psalmanazar's Formosa: Science as Fiction 52 / 
Remote Island Fantasies 53 / Swift's Japan 55 /



Bougainville, Diderot, Rousseau, and Paradise Lost 56 /
Conclusion 57
3 Observations on Nature                                   59
Great Asian Herbals and Floras 60 / The Lure of Spices
and Other Riches 65 / Global Plant Exchanges 67 /
Reverse Flow 71 / The Plant Hunters 74 / The Bounds of
the Natural World 77 / Conclusion 82
4 Catholic Cosmologies                                     85
Jesuitas na Asia: The Jesuits in Asia 86 / The Goa Press 87 / 
The Macau Press 88 / The Nagasaki Press 89 / The Beijing
Press 92 / The Manila Press 92 / The Church Canon on
Asia 94 / The Visual Arts in Religious Propagation 101 / 
Alterities, Heresies, and Hybrid Cosmologies 104 / The
Rites Controversy 108 / Conclusion 109
5 Mapping Eurasia                                         113
The Rise of European Map Culture 113 / Overcoming
Ptolemy/Polo 115 / Incorporating New Cartesian
Geography 116 / Atlases and Globes 120 /
Map Representations of Siberia and Central Asia 123 /
Mapping China 124 / The European Mapping of Japan 127 /
Map Production in Japan 130 / Korea Mapped 132 /
Mapping Vietnam and Siam 133 / Mapping the Eastern Archipelago 134 / 
Imagining Asia 138 / Conclusion 141
6 Enlightenment Views of Asian Governance                 145
Enlightenment Views of Governance in China 146 /
Engelbert Kaempfer and Japanese Despotism 149 / Hendrik
Hamel's Korea 152 / Islamic Courts 153 / Jean-Baptiste
Taverier's Travels in India 154 / Augustin de Beaulieu at the 
Sultanate of Aceh 155 / Montesquieu, the Seraglio, 
and the Slavery of Women 157 / Hindu-Buddhistic Kingdoms
158 / Gaspero Baldi at the Court of Pegu 158 / Henry
Hagenaar at the Cambodian Court 159 / Gerald Hulft at 
the Court of Kandy 160 / Europe at the Court of Siam-Siam at
the Court of Europe 162 / Voltaire on Brahmin India 164 /
Dutch Justice in Asia 165 / Conclusion 167
7 Civilizational Encounters                               169
The Mongol Exchange 170 / The Sinic View of the Universe 171 / 
The Jesuit Reception in China 172 /



Chinese Ethnocentricity? 174 / Chinese Rejection of
Western Science 177 / Vietnam and the Chinese Model 178
/ The Japanese Reception of Europe 180 / An Example
from Korea 186 / Symbolic Space in Indic Cosmography 187 / 
Darul Islam: The World of Islam 190 / The Animist World View: 
An Example from the Marianas 194 / Conclusion 195
8 Livelihoods                                            199
Iberian Views of Sixteenth-Century China 200 / Luis
Fr6is's Japan 202 / Urban Society 204 / Music, Dancing,
and Festivals 207 / Fashion, Style, and Attire 209 /
Culinary Encounters: William Dampier in Vietnam 212 /
Gendered Violence 213 / Crime and Punishment 218 /
Conclusion 221
9 Language, Power, and Hegemony in European
Oriental Studies                                       223
The European Study of Asian Languages 223 / Translating
the Arabic World 225 / Indology 228 / Dunia Melayu:
Malay World 231 / The Extinction of Tagalog Script 235 / 
Learning Chinese 237 / Rangaku: Japanese Lexicology 240
/ The Jesuit Invention of Quoc Ngu 242 / Translating
Buddhist Asia 243 / Orientalism Revisited 245 /
Conclusion 246
10 A Theory of Global Culturalization                     249
Creole Cultures, Creoles, and Creolization 250 / Portuguese
as First World Language 254 / The Little World of the
Macanese and Timorese 259 / Mexico-Spanish-Philippines
Cultural Transactions 262 / Cultural Crossovers 264 /
Portugalized/Hispanicized Toponyms 269 / Conclusion 271
Conclusion                                                275
The Eurasia Exchange 275 / Roots of Divergence? 278 / 
The Creolization Effect 281 / Envoi on Orientalism 282 /
Lessons of Global History 283
References                                                285
Index                                                     325
About the Author                                          343





Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Europe Relations Asia, Asia Relations Europe, East and West, Europe Civilization Oriental influences, Asia Foreign public opinion, Western