Table of contents for Lyndon Baines Johnson / Thomas S. Langston.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Electronic data is machine generated. May be incomplete or contain other coding.


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1. From the Hill Country to Washington and Back Again:
  A Biographical Sketch  15
  Pride and Shame: Growing up a Johnson in Johnson City  16
  Not to College but to California  17
  San Marcos, Cotulla, and Houston  18
  Secretary to a Playboy Congressman  20
  Marriage, Courtship, and the National Youth Administration  21
  Representative Johnson  22
  Senator Johnson  27
  Majority Leader Johnson  28
  Vice President Johnson  31
  President Johnson  32
  President Johnson in Retirement  33
Documents
   1.1 Map of Texas Outlining Hill Country  35
   1.2 Family History  36
   1.3 Alamo Purchase Bill  37
   1.4 Letter from Rebekah Johnson to Lyndon Johnson,
        February 4, 1953  38
   1.5 Johnson the College Student  39
   1.6 Johnson the Grade-School Teacher  41
   1.7 Letter from Lyndon Johnson to Rebekah Johnson,
        December 1931   43
   1.8 Texas Tenth Congressional District Elections,
        1937-1946   44
   1.9 Lady Bird Builds a Fortune in Television  44
   1.10 "Lyndon's Letter," March 1947 48
   1.11 Johnson Starts His Campaign for the U.S. Senate,
        May 12,1948   50
   1.12 Helicopters and the Political Process  51
   1.13 Johnson's Senatorial Elections, 1941-1960  53
   1.14 Johnson's Many Daddies  54
   1.15 Letter from Johnson to Sam Rayburn, May 13, 1939  54
   1.16 Experiencing the "Johnson Treatment"  55



   1.17 The McCarthy Censure  56
   1.18 Meeting Ordinary People  61
   1.19 The Great Society Suffers  62
   1.20 The Humor of Lyndon Johnson 62

2. Campaigns and Elections  65
  Early Campaigns: Effort and Skullduggery  65
  Preparing for and Winning National Office  67
  The 1960 Election  68
  The 1964 Election  70
  The Thirty-sixth President  76
  The 1968 and 1972 Elections  77
Documents
   2.1 Kennedy's Strategy for Winning the Presidency  80
   2.2 Public Opinion, March 27,1960  81
   2.3 Johnson's Ratings in the South, March 16, 1960  82
   2.4 Presidential Choices of Democratic County Chairmen,
        June 22,1960  83
   2.5 Democratic Presidential Primary Results, 1960  83
   2.6 Democratic Party Convention Ballots, 1960  85
   2.7 Accepting the Number-Two Spot  86
   2.8  1960 Election Results  87
   2.9 Telephone Conversation between Johnson and
        George Reedy, August 25, 1964  88
   2.10 Telephone Conversation between Johnson and
        Walter Jenkins, August 25, 1964 90
   2.11 The Daisy Commercial  90
   2.12 Correspondence between Sen. Everett Dijrksen and the
        National Association of Broadcasters  92
   2.13 Public Opinion Poll, September 25, 1964  94
   2.14 Campaign Speech, October 9, 1964  95
   2.15 1964 Election Results  96
   2.16 Inaugural Address, 1965  96
   2.17 The Thirteen Keys to the Presidency  100
   2.18 Fulfilling Campaign Promises  103
   2.19 Shall Not Seek Another Term  103

3. Administration Policies  105
   The Kennedy Legacy   105
   War on Poverty  109
   The Great Society  112
   Foreign Policies  118
Documents
   3.1 The Kennedy-Johnson Tax Cut 131
   3.2 First Address to a Joint Session of Congress,
        November 27, 1963  135



   3.3 Proposing the "Great Society," May 22, 1964  1.39
   3.4 The Elementary and Secondary Education Bill,
         April 11, 1965  143
   3.5 Legislative Accomplishments in the Eighty-ninth
         Congress  145
   3.6 The American Promise, March 15, 1965  147
   3.7 Estimated Percentage of Blacks Registered to Vote in
         Eleven Southern States, 1956-1976  153
   3.8 The Dominican Republic  154
   3.9 Foreign Aid  155
   3.10 Major Foreign Policy Accomplishments  157
   3.11 Foreign Affairs Highlights  159

4. Crises and Flashpoints  163
   Assuming the Presidency  163
   The Vietnam War 167
   Lyndon Johnson's War?  177
Documents
   4.1 The Kennedy Assasination  181
   4.2  Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty,
        September 8, 1954  184
   4.3 Supporting Vietnam: National Security Action
        Memorandum 273, November 26,1963 186
   4.4  Tonkin Gulf Resolution, August 7, 1964  188
   4.5 What Happened in Tonkin Gulf?  189
   4.6 National Security Action Memorandum 328,
        April 6, 1965  190
   4.7 Americanizing the War in Vietnam  191
   4.8 Press Conference Denying Increases in Troop Deployment,
        July 28, 1965  194
   4.9 Map of Vietnam during the Johnson Administration  196
   4.10  Gen. William Westmoreland Requests Additional Troops  197
   4.11 Letter from Drew Pearson to the President,
        March 11, 1968 202
   4.12 Vietnam Special with Walter Cronkite,
        February 27, 1968  203
   4.13 Public Opinion Supporting the Vietnam War,
        May 1965-May 1971 205
   4.14 The Decision to Halt the Bombing, Recollections from
        February 6, 1970  207
   4.15 Hawks, Doves, and Vietnam  209
   4.16 Support and Opposition in the Vietnam War  210
   4.17 Peace without Conquest, April 7, 1965  212

5. Institutional Relations 217
   Congress  218



   Intellectuals, Dissenters, and Protesters  221
   Civil Rights Leaders  223
   The Government 224
   The Military 225
   The Media 227
   The Courts  230
   The Public 233
Documents
    5.1  Relations with Congress  237
    5.2 Requests for Legislation  238
    5.3 Presidential Requests for Legislation: Large Programs versus
         Small Programs 239
    5.4  Presidential Requests for Legislation: New Programs versus
         Old Programs  240
    5.5  Proposals versus Vetoes  240
    5.6 Conversation between Johnson and Martin Luther King Jr.,
         January 15, 1965  241
    5.7 Roy Wilkins on Johnson  241
    5.8 Major U.S. Military Interventions, 1961-1967  243
    5.9 Media Problems  244
    5.10 Supreme Court Justices  246
    5.11 Landmark Supreme Court Cases and Important
         Constitutional Events  247
    5.12 Most Admired People, 1963  249
    5.13 Presidential Approval  250
    5.14  Support for Vietnam as a Function of U.S. Battle Deaths  253

6. After the White House: Johnson in Retirement 255
Documents
    6.1 Limiting the War in Vietnam and the Decision Not to
        Seek Reelection 261
    6.2 Reflections  263
    6.3 Presidential Medals of Freedom  265
    6.4 Johnson's Solace in Retirement  269
    6.5 Johnson's Remarks at the LBJ Library Dedication,
        May 22,1971   271
    6.6 Civil Rights Symposium  272
    6.7 Eulogizing Johnson  275
    6.8 Bill Moyers on Johnson  276

Appendix A: Notable Figures of the Johnson Presidency  281
Appendix B: Key Events in Johnson's Life 307

Index  317