Table of contents for Byte wars : the impact of September 11 on information technology / Ed Yourdon.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Electronic data is machine generated. May be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
September 11, 2001
The paradigm shift.
IT will be one of the likely battlefields
of the future
What Assumptions Does the Book Make About You?
Who Is This Book Aimed At?
Structure of the Book



Chapter 2
STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS OF 9/11
Personal Consequences
Corporate Consequences
Recognition of the unpredictability of
today's world
Developing early-warning systems of
impending change
Learning to change and adapt much more
quickly than ever before
Recognizing the importance and vulnerability
of their "information assets"
National Consequences
"Guns and butter" vs. "guns or butter"
Recognition of national
"critical infrastructure" issues
Coordination, improvement of
existing systems
Impact on privacy
Conclusion
Chapter 3
SECURITY
Basic Concepts
Techniques and Technologies
Identification of users
Authorization and access control
Protection of data in transit across
"exposed" areas
Audit of activities and accesses to
information



Monitoring of suspected security threats
Paradigm Shift
IT systems are part of
the "critical infrastructure"
Threats exist from various levels of players.
Operational security vs. software
development security
Physical security has changed because of
miniaturization
Using the Internet as indirect weapon to
support terrorism,
The decade of security
Strategic Implications
Government and political leaders
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
Technical IT professionals
Citizens
Chapter 4
RISK MANAGEMENT
Basic Concepts
Techniques and Technologies
Establishing a risk-aware culture
Realistic assessment of risks
Ensuring that risks are shared between
stakeholders
Developing processes for
risk management
Paradigm Shifts in Risk Management
High tech can be threatened by low tech



Kamikaze players
The rise of the "stateless" power
The rapid pace of change
Strategic Implications
Government officials
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens
Chapter 5
EMERGENT SYSTEMS
Basic Concepts
Benefits of emergent systems and
emergent organizations
Characteristics of the emergent
organization
Techniques and Technologies
Peer-to-peer communication mechanisms
Tools for collaboration
Modeling and simulation tools
Paradigm Shifts
Strategic Implications
Government leaders
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens



Chapter 6
RESILIENT SYSTEMS.
Basic Concepts
Techniques and Technologies
Familiar techniques
Early warning systems
Mechanisms for rapid change
Paradigm Shifts
Strategic Implications
Government officials
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens
Chapter 7
GOOD ENOUGH SYSTEMS
Basic Concepts
Techniques and Technologies for
Developing Good-Enough Software
A utilitarian strategy
An evolutionary strategy
Heroic teams
Dynamic infrastructure
Dynamic processes.
Paradigm Shifts
Malevolent threats
Life and death circumstances,
Strategic Implications
Government leaders



Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens
Chapter 8
DEATH-MARCH PROJECTS
Basic Concepts
What is a death-march project?
Why do death-march projects exist?
Why do people participate in
death-march projects?
Techniques and Technologies
Negotiations
Peopleware
Processes
Monitoring progress
Paradigm Shifts
The impact of September 11th
The impact of the recession
Strategic Implications
Government leaders
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens



Chapter 9
CONCLUSIONS
A Summary of the Paradigm Shifts
Security-related paradigm shifts
Risk management paradigm shifts
Emergent-systems paradigm shifts
Resiliency paradigm shifts
Good-enough paradigm shifts
Death-march paradigm shifts
A Summary of the Strategic Implications
Government officials
Senior corporate executives
Mid-level IT managers
IT professionals
Citizens
A Final Thought:
When Will We Be Able to Abandon These Ideas?








Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Computer security United States, Computer networks Security measures United States, Information technology United States Management, September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001, Cyberterrorism Prevention