Table of contents for Foundations of tropical forest biology : classic papers with commentaries / editors, Robin L. Chazdon and T.C. Whitmore.


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PART ONE
Tropical Naturalists of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries
Robin L. Chazdon and the Earl of Cranbrook 5
1
A. von Humboldt and A. Bonpland (1814-21)
Excerpts from Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of the
New Continent, during the Years 1799-1804
Translated by Helen Maria Williams. 5 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme,
and Brown  15
2
H. W. Bates (1864)
Excerpt from The Naturalist on the River Amazons
London: John Murray  22
3
T. Belt (1874)
Excerpt from The Naturalist in Nicaragua
London: John Murray  37



4
A. R. Wallace (1895)
Excerpt from Natural Selection and Tropical Nature
London: Macmillan    51
5
A. F.W. Schimper ([1898] 1903)
Excerpt from Plant-Geography upon a Physiological Basis
Translated by W. R. Fischer; edited by P. Groom and I. B. Balfour. Oxford:
Clarendon Press      63
PART TWO
WthaShaped Tropical Biotas as We See Them Today?
T. C. Whitmore 69
6
T. van der Hammen (1974)
The Pleistocene Changes of Vegetation and Climate in Tropical
South America
Journal of Biogeography 1:3-26   75
7
J. Haffer (1969)
Speciation in Amazonian Forest Birds
Science 165:131-37         99
8
P. H. Raven and D. I. Axelrod (1974)
Excerpts from Angiosperm Biogeography and Past Continental Movements
Annals of the Missouri Botanic Garden 61:539-73   106
9
F G. Stehli and S. D. Webb (1985)
A Kaleidoscope of Plates, Faunal and Floral Dispersals, and Sea Level Changes
Excerpts from chapter 1 of The Great American Biotic Interchange.
New York: Plenum Press           150



PART THREE
Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives on the Origins
of Tropical Diversity
Douglas W. Schemske 163
10
T. Dobzhansky (1950)
Evolution in the Tropics
American Scientist 38:209-21     174
11
A. G. Fischer (1960)
Latitudinal Variations in Organic Diversity
Evolution 14:64-81               187
12
A. A. Fedorov (1966)
The Structure of the Tropical Rain Forest and Speciation in the Humid Tropics
Journal of Ecology 54:1-11       205
13
E. R. Pianka (1966)
Latitudinal Gradients in Species Diversity: A Review of Concepts
American Naturalist 100:33-46    216
14
D. H. Janzen (1967)
Why Mountain Passes are Higher in the Tropics
American Naturalist 101:233-49   230
15
R. H. MacArthur (1969)
Patterns of Communities in the Tropics
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 1:19-30    247



16
J. H. Connell (1978)
Diversity in Tropical Rain Forests and Coral Reefs
Science 199:1302-10           259
PART FOUR
Plant-Animal Interactions and Community Structure
Bette A. Loiselle and Rodolfo Dirzo 269
17
D. H. Janzen (1970)
Herbivores and the Number of Tree Species in Tropical Forests
American Naturalist 104:501-28               279
18
P. D. Coley (1980)
Effects of Leaf Age and Plant Life History Patterns on Herbivory
Nature 284:545-46              307
19
L. van der Pijl (1972)
Excerpt from Principles of Dispersal in Higher Plants
New York: Springer-Verlag      309
20
F. G. Stiles (1975)
Ecology, Flowering Phenology, and Hummingbird Pollination
of some Costa Rican Heliconia Species
Ecology 56:285-301                   322
PART FIVE
Coevolution
Robert J. Marquis and Rodolfo Dirzo 339



21
H. W. Bates (1862)
Excerpt from Contributions to an Insect Fauna of the Amazon Valley.
Lepidoptera: Heliconidae
Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 23:495-567       348
22
T. Belt (1874)
Excerpt from The Naturalist in Nicaragua
London: John Murray                 366
23
J. Galil and D. Eisikowitch (1968)
On the Pollination Ecology of Ficus sycomorus in East Africa
Ecology 49:259-69         380
24
C. H. Dodson, R. L. Dressier, H. G. Hills, R. M. Adams, and N. H. Williams (1969)
Biologically Active Compounds in Orchid Fragrances
Science 164:1243-49       391
25
D. W. Snow (1971)
Evolutionary Aspects of Fruit-Eating by Birds
Ibis 113:194-202          398
PART SIX
Case Studies of Arthropod Diversity and Distribution
Scott E. Miller, Vojtech Novotny, and Yves Basset 407
26
E. O. Wilson (1958)
Patchy Distributions of Ant Species in New Guinea Rain Forests
Psyche 65:26-38           414



27
A.J. Haddow, P.S. Corbet, and J. D. Gillett (1961)
Entomological Studiesfrom n   High Tower in Mpanga Forest Uganda
Transactions of the Royal Entomological Society of London,Introduon, plates I-I
and abstracts to parts2, 45, and 6            427
28
T. L. Erwin (1982)
Tropical Forests: Their Richness in Coleoptera andOther Arthropod Species
The Coleopterists Bulletin 36:74-75           438
PART SEVEN
Terrestrial Vertebrate Diversity
B. A. Loiselle, R W. Sussman, and the Earl of Cranbrook 441
29
J. L.Harrison (1962)
Excerpts from The   istribution ofT eed     Habits among Animas
in a Tropical Rain Forest
Journal of Animal Ecology 31:53-64            449
30
. H. Crook andJ. S. GartI    (1966
Evolution of Primate Societies
Nature 210:1200-1203                          457
31
M. P. L. Fogden (1972
Excerpt from 7The    so:l     anfopulation Dynamics of Equatorial
Forest Birds in Sarawak
Ibis 114:307-42               461
32
M. L. Crump (1974)
Excerpts from Reproductive Strategies in a TropicalAnuran Community
Miscellaneous Publications, Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 61:1-68
470



33
J. Terborgh (1977)
Bird Species Diversity on an Andean Elevational Gradient
Ecology 58:1007-19
486
34
A. Gautier-Hion (1978)
Excerpts from Food Niches and Coexistence in Sympatric Primates in Gabon
In Feeding Behavior in Relation to Food Availability and Composition, edited by
C. M. Hladik and D. J. Chivers, 269-86. New York: Academic Press
499
PART EIGHT
Floristic Composition and Species Richness
Robin L. Chazdon and Julie S. Denslow 513
35
A. Aubreville (1938)
Regeneration Patterns in the Closed Forest of Ivory Coast
In World Vegetation Types, ed. S. R. Eyre, 41-55. London: Macmillan, 1971
(A translation by S. R. Eyre from "La fort coloniale," Academie des Sciences
Coloniales:Annales 9:126-37)
523
36
P. W. Richards (1952)
Excerpt from Composition of Primary Rain Forest (II)
In The Tropical Rain Forest, 248-54. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
538
37
J. M. Pires, T. Dobzhansky, and G. A. Black (1953)
An Estimate of the Number of Species of Trees in an Amazonian
Forest Community
Botanical Gazette 114:467-77
545
38
P. S. Ashton (1964)
Excerpts from Ecological Studies in the Mixed Dipterocarp Forests
of Brunei State
Oxford Forestry Memoir 25:1-75
556



PART NINE
Forest Dynantcs and      Regeeraio 
David F. R. P. Burslem and M. D. Swaine 577
39
W J. Eggeling (1947)
Excerpt from Observations on the Ecology of the Budogo Raorestga
Journal of Ecology 34:20-87
40
C. G. G. J. van Steenis (1958)
Rejuvenation as a actorfor Judgin the Status of Vegetation Types:
The Biological Nomad Theory
In Study of Tropical Vegetation, 212-15,218. Paris: UNESCO
587
41
G. Budowski (1965)
Distributionof TropicalAmerican Rain    rest Species in the Light
of Successional Processes
Turrialba 15:40-42
592
42
L. J. Webb, J. G. Tracey, and W. T. Williams (1972)
Regeneration and Pattern in the Subtropcal Rain Forest
Journal of Ecology 60:675- 95
595
43
T. C. Whitmore (1974)
Excerpts from Change with Time and the Role of Cyclones in Tropical
Rain Forest on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands
Oxford: Commonwealth Forestry Institute, Paper 46
616
PART TEN
Ecosystem Ecology in the Tropics
Julie S. Denslow and Robin L. Chazdon  639



44
P. H. Nye and D. J. Greenland (1960)
Excerpt from The Soil under Shifting Cultivation
Farnham Royal, U.K.: Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux
646
45
E. J. Fittkau and H. Klinge (1973)
On Biomass and Trophic Structure of the CentralAmazonian
Rain Forest Ecosystem
Biotropica 5:2-14
660
46
T. Kira (1978)
Community Architecture and Organic Matter Dynamics in Tropical Lowland
Rain Forests of Southeast Asia with Special Reference to Pasoh Forest,
West Malaysia
In Tropical Trees as Living Systems, edited by T. B. Tomlinson and M. H. Zimmerman,
561-90. New York: Cambridge University Press
673
PART ELEVEN
Human Impact and Species Extinction
Rodolfo Dirzo and Robert W. Sussman 703
47
A. G6mez-Pompa, C. Vazquez-Yanes, and S. Guevara (1972)
Tropical Rain Forest: A Nonrenewable Resource
Science 177:762-65
712
48
J. M. Diamond (1973)
Distributional Ecology of New Guinea Birds
Science 179:759-69
716
49
E. O. Willis (1974)
Populations and Local Extinctions of Birds on Barro Colorado Island, Panama
Ecological Monographs 44:153-69
727



50
A. D. Johns (1986)
Effects of Selective Logging on the Behavioral Ecology
of West Malaysian Primates
Ecology 67:684-94
744
51
D. Simberloff (1986)
Are We on the Verge of a Mass Extinction in Tropical Rain Forests?
In Dynamics of Extinction, ed. D. K. Elliot, 165-80. New York: Wiley
755
PART TWELVE
Securing a Sustainable Future for Tropical Moist Forests
D. Lamb and T. C. Whitmore 771
52
P. Kunstadter and E. C. Chapman (1978)
Problems of Shifting Cultivation and Economic Development
in Northern Thailand
In Farmers in the Forest, edited by P. Kunstadter, E. C. Chapman, and S. Sabhasri, 3-23.
Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press
779
53
I. H. Burkill (1935)
Daemonorhops
In A Dictionary of the Economic Products of the Malay Peninsula. London:
Crown Agents for the Colonies
801
54
J. Wyatt-Smith (1959)
Development of a Silvicultural System for the Conversion of Natural Inland
Lowland Evergreen Rain Forest of Malaya
Malayan Forester 22:133-42
804



55
A. J. Leslie (1987)
A Second Look at the Economics of Natural Management Systems
in Tropical Mixed Forests
Unasylva 39, no. 155:46-58
814
56
J. C. Westoby (1979)
Forest Industries for Socio-Economic Development
Commonwealth Forestry Review 58:107-16
827








Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Forest ecology Tropics, Forests and forestry Tropics