Table of contents for Poetry and the fate of the senses / Susan Stewart.


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PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS                            ix
CHAPTER I     IN THE DARKNESS
I.   The Privations of Night and the Origins of Poiesis  1
II.  Laughter, Weeping, and the Order of the Senses    17
III.  The Lyric Eidos                                  38
CHAPTER 2     SOUND
I.   Dynamics of Poetic Sound                          59
II.  Hopkins: Invocation and Listening                 90
CHAPTER 3     VOICE AND POSSESSION
I.   The Beloved's Voice                              107
II.  Three Cases of Lyric Possession                  124
CHAPTER 4     FACING, TOUCH, AND VERTIGO
I.   The Experience of Beholding                      145
II.  Touch in Aesthetic Forms                         160
III.  Vertigo: The Legacy of Baroque Ecstasy          178
CHAPTER 5     THE FORMS AND NUMBERS OF TIME
I.   The Deictic Now                                  197
II.  Traces of Human Motion: The Ubi Sunt Tradition   208
III.  Meditation and Number: Traherne's Centuries     227
IV.  The Problem of Poetic History                    242



CHAPTER 6     OUT OF THE DARKNESS: NOCTURNES
I.    Finch's Transformation of the Night Work         255
II.  The Emergence of a Nocturne Tradition             280
CHAPTER 7     LYRIC COUNTER EPIC
I.   War and the Alienation of the Senses              293
II.  Two Lyric Critiques of Epic: Brooks and Walcott   309
AFTERBORN                                              327
NOTES                                                  335
REFERENCES                                             389
INDEX OF POEMS                                         429
GENERAL INDEX                                          433








Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Lyric poetry History and criticism, Poetry History and criticism, Poetics