Table of contents for Neural plasticity and regeneration / edited by Fredrick J. Seil.


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Section I. Strategies for spinal cord injury repair
1. Strategies for spinal cord injury repair
D.M. McTigue, P.G. Popovich, L.B. Jakeman and B.T. Stokes
(Columbus, OH, USA) .................................... ......  3
2. Cell death and plasticity after experimental spinal cord injury
M.S. Beattie, Q. Li and J.C. Bresnahan (Columbus, OH, USA) ......  9
3. The multi-domain structure of extracellular matrix molecules: implications for
nervous system regeneration
S. Meiners, M.L.T. Mercado and H.M. Geller (Piscataway, NJ, USA)  23
4. Spinal cord injury-induced inflammation: a dual-edged sword
J.R. Bethea (Miami, FL, USA)  ............. ......................  33
5. Immunological regulation of neuronal degeneration and regeneration in the
injured spinal cord
P.G. Popovich (Columbus, OH, USA) ..............................  43
Section II. Plasticity of the injured spinal cord: retraining neural circuits to
promote motor recovery
6. Plasticity of neuronal networks in the spinal cord: modifications in response to
altered sensory input
K.G. Pearson (Edmonton, AB, Canada) ..........................  61
7. Neural plasticity as revealed by the natural progression of movement expression
-  both voluntary and involuntary -  in humans after spinal cord
injury
B. Calancie, M. Del Rosario Molano and J.G. Broton (Miami, FL,
USA )  ............................................................  7 1
8. Laufband (LB) therapy in spinal cord lesioned persons
A. Werig, A. Nanassy and S. Miiller (Bonn and Karlsbad-Langen-
steinbach, Germany) ..............................................  89



9. Spinal and supraspinal plasticity after incomplete spinal cord injury: correlations
between functional magnetic resonance imaging and engaged loco-
motor networks
B.H. Dobkin (Los Angeles, CA, USA) ................... ..........  99
Section III. Impact of neuroprosthetic applications on functional recovery
10. Impact of neuroprosthetic applications on functional recovery
J.K. Chapin (Brooklyn, NY, USA) .................................   115
11. Nerve cuffs for nerve repair and regeneration
J.A. Hoffer and K. Kalles0e (Bumaby, BC, Canada) ................ 121
12. Cortical motor areas and their properties: implications for neuroprosthetics
P.D. Cheney, J. Hill-Karrer, A. Belhaj-SaYf, B.J. McKieman,
M.C. Park and J.K. Marcario (Kansas City, KS, USA) .............. 135
13. Network level properties of short-term plasticity in the somatosensory system
D.J. Krupa and M.A.L. Nicolelis (Durham, NC, USA) .............. 161
14. The reorganization of somatosensory and motor cortex after peripheral nerve or
spinal cord injury in primates
J.H. Kaas (Nashville, TN, USA) ...................................   173
Section IV. Neurotrophins and activity-dependent plasticity
15. Neurotrophins and activity-dependent plasticity
H. Thoenen (Martinsried, Germany) ............................... 183
16. Differences in the regulation of neuropeptide Y, somatostatin and parvalbumin
levels in hippocampal intemeurons by neuronal activity and BDNF
S. Marty (Creteil, France) .........................................  193
17. Long-term regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in
hippocampal cultures by brain-derived neurotrophic factor
M.M. Bolton, D.C. Lo and N.T. Sherwood (Durham, NC, USA) .... 203
18. Neurotrophins and activity-dependent inhibitory synaptogenesis
F.J. Seil and R. Drake-Baumann (Portland, OR, USA) .............. 219
19. Modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity by neuro-
trophins
B. Lu and W. Gottschalk (Bethesda, MD, USA) .................... 231
20. Neurotrophin-evoked rapid excitation of central neurons
K.W. Kafitz, C.R. Rose and A. Konnerth (Munich, Germany) ....... 243



Section V. Candidate cells for transplantation into the injured CNS
21. Candidate cells for transplantation into the injured CNS
I. Fischer (Philadelphia, PA, USA) .................................  253
22. Autoimmune involvement in CNS trauma is beneficial if well controlled
M. Schwartz (Rehovot, Israel) ................... .................. 259
23. Olfactory ensheathing glia transplantation into the injured spinal cord
A. Ram6n-Cueto (Valencia, Spain) ................................ 265
24. Precursor cells for transplantation
M.S. Rao and M. Mayer-Proschel (Salt Lake City, UT, USA) ....... 273
25. Potential use of marrow stromal cells as therapeutic vectors for diseases of the
central nervous system
D.J. Prockop, S.A. Azizi, D.G. Phinney, G.C. Kopen and
E.J. Schwarz (New Orleans, LA and Philadelphia, PA, USA)........ 293
26. Neurobiology of human neurons (NT2N) grafted into mouse spinal cord: impli-
cations for improving therapy of spinal cord injury
V.M.-Y. Lee, R.S. Hartley and J.Q. Trojanowski (Philadelphia, PA
and Sunnyvale, CA, USA) ........................................ 299
27. Grafting of genetically modified fibroblasts into the injured spinal cord
Y. Liu, M. Murray, A. Tessler and I. Fischer (Philadelphia, PA, USA) 309
Section VI. New directions in regeneration research
28. Delivery of therapeutic molecules into the CNS
M.E. Emborg and J.H. Kordower (Chicago, IL, USA) .............. 323
29. Neurotrophin small-molecule mimetics
Y. Xie and F.M. Longo (San Francisco, CA, USA) .................. 333
30. Tissue engineering strategies for nervous system repair
P.A. Tresco (Salt Lake City, UT, USA) ............................. 349
31. In vivo neuroprotection of injured CNS neurons by a single injection of a DNA
plasmid encoding the Bcl-2 gene
R.A. Saavedra, M. Murray, S. De Lacalle and A. Tessler (Philadel-
phia, PA and Los Angeles, CA, USA) .............................. 365








Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Nervous system Regeneration Congresses, Neuroplasticity Congresses