Table of contents for College physics : an integrated approach to forces and kinematics / Alan Giambattist, Betty McCarthy Ricardson, Robert C. Richardson.

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BRIEF CONTENTS
	 	# 
Chapter 1	Introduction 1
	PART ONE 	Mechanics
Chapter 2	Force 23
Chapter 3	Acceleration and Newton?s Second Law of 
Motion 69
Chapter 4	Motion with a Changing Velocity 107
Chapter 5	Circular Motion 143
Chapter 6	Conservation of Energy 181
Chapter 7	Linear Momentum 221
Chapter 8	Torque and Angular Momentum 255
Chapter 9	Fluids 309
Chapter 10	Elasticity and Oscillations 349
Chapter 11	Waves 385
Chapter 12	Sound 415
	PART TWO 	Thermal Physics
Chapter 13	Temperature and Ideal Gas 453
Chapter 14	Heat 485
Chapter 15	Thermodynamics 523
	PART THREE 	Electomagnetism
Chapter 16	Electric Forces and Fields 561
Chapter 17	Electric Potential 599
Chapter 18	Electric Current and Circuits 637
Chapter 19	Magnetic Forces and Fields 687
Chapter 20	Electromagnetic Induction 733
Chapter 21	Alternating Current 771
	PART FOUR 	Electromagnetic Waves and Optics
Chapter 22	Electromagnetic Waves 801
Chapter 23	Reflection and Refraction of Light 837
Chapter 24	Optical Instruments 879
Chapter 25	Interference and Diffraction 909
	PART FIVE 	Quantum and Particle Physics and Relativity
Chapter 26	Relativity 953
Chapter 27	Early Quantum Physics and the Photon 983
Chapter 28	Quantum Physics 1015
Chapter 29	Nuclear Physics 1049
Chapter 30	Particle Physics 1089
		Appendix A 	Mathematics Review A-1
		Appendix B 	Table of Selected Nuclides A-15
CONTENTS
List of Selected Applications x
Preface xiii
To the Student xxi
Acknowledgments xxix
Chapter 1	Introduction 1
	1.1	Why Study Physics? 2
	1.2	Talking Physics 2
	1.3	The Use of Mathematics 3
	1.4	Scientific Notation and Significant Figures 4
	1.5	Units 7
	1.6	Dimensional Analysis 10
	1.7	Problem-Solving Techniques 12
	1.8	Approximation 13
	1.9	Graphs 14
PART ONE
Mechanics
Chapter 2 	Force 23
	2.1	Force 24
	2.2	Net Force 26
	2.3	Inertia and Equilibrium: Newton?s First Law of Motion 29
	2.4	Vector Addition Using Components 33
	2.5	Interaction Pairs: Newton?s Third Law 
of Motion 38
	2.6	Gravitational Forces 40
	2.7	Contact Forces 43
	2.8	Tension 50
	2.9	Fundamental Forces 54
Chapter 3 	Acceleration and Newton?s Second Law of 
Motion 69
	3.1	Position and Displacement 70
	3.2	Velocity 74
	3.3	Newton?s Second Law of Motion 80
	3.4	Applying Newton?s Second Law 87
	3.5	Velocity Is Relative; Reference Frames 93
Chapter 4 	Motion with a Changing Velocity 107
	4.1	Motion Along a Line Due to a Constant Net Force 108
	4.2	Visualizing Motion Along a Line with Constant Acceleration 114
	4.3	Free Fall 118
	4.4	Motion of Projectiles 120
	4.5	Apparent Weight 126
	4.6	Air Resistance 129
Chapter 5 	Circular Motion 143
	5.1	Description of Uniform Circular Motion 144
	5.2	Radial Acceleration 149
	5.3	Unbanked and Banked Curves 153
	5.4	Circular Orbits of Satellites and Planets 156
	5.5	Nonuniform Circular Motion 160
	5.6	Tangential and Angular Acceleration 164
	5.7	Apparent Weight and Artificial Gravity 166
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 1?5 178
Chapter 6 	Conservation of Energy 181
	6.1	The Law of Conservation of Energy 182
	6.2	Work Done by a Constant Force 183
	6.3	Kinetic Energy 190
	6.4	Gravitational Potential Energy (1) 192
	6.5	Gravitational Potential Energy (2) 197
	6.6	Work Done by Variable Forces: 
Hooke?s Law 200
	6.7	Elastic Potential Energy 203
	6.8	Power 206
Chapter 7 	Linear Momentum 221
	7.1	A Vector Conservation Law 222
	7.2	Momentum 222
	7.3	The Impulse-Momentum Theorem 224
	7.4	Conservation of Momentum 230
	7.5	Center of Mass 233
	7.6	Motion of the Center of Mass 235
	7.7	Collisions in One Dimension 237
	7.8	Collisions in Two Dimensions 242
Chapter 8 	Torque and Angular Momentum 255
	8.1	Rotational Kinetic Energy and Rotational Inertia 256
	8.2	Torque 261
	8.3	Work Done by a Torque 266
	8.4	Equilibrium Revisited 267
	8.5	Equilibrium in the Human Body 275
	8.6	Rotational Form of Newton?s 
Second Law 280
	8.7	The Motion of Rolling Objects 281
	8.8	Angular Momentum 284
	8.9	The Vector Nature of Angular 
Momentum 287
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 6-8 303
Chapter 9 	Fluids 309
	9.1	States of Matter 310
	9.2	Pressure 310
	9.3	Pascal?s Principle 313
	9.4	The Effect of Gravity on Fluid Pressure 314
	9.5	Measuring Pressure 317
	9.6	Archimedes? Principle 320
	9.7	Fluid Flow 324
	9.8	Bernoulli?s Equation 327
	9.9	Viscosity 331
	9.10	Viscous Drag 334
	9.11	Surface Tension 336
Chapter 10 	Elasticity and 
Oscillations 349
	10.1	Elastic Deformations of Solids 350
	10.2 	Hooke?s Law for Tensile and Compressive Forces 350
	10.3	Beyond Hooke?s Law 352
	10.4	Shear and Volume Deformations 355
	10.5	Simple Harmonic Motion 359
	10.6	The Period and Frequency for SHM 362
	10.7	Graphical Analysis of SHM 366
	10.8	The Pendulum 368
	10.9	Damped Oscillations 373
	10.10	Forced Oscillations and Resonance 373
Chapter 11 	Waves 385
	11.1	Waves and Energy Transport 386
	11.2	Transverse and Longitudinal Waves 388
	11.3	Speed of Transverse Waves on a String 390
	11.4	Periodic Waves 391
	11.5	Mathematical Description of a Wave 393
	11.6	Graphing Waves 394
	11.7	Principle of Superposition 396
	11.8	Reflection and Refraction 397
	11.9	Interference and Diffraction 400
	11.10	Standing Waves 402
Chapter 12 	Sound 415
	12.1	Sound Waves 416
	12.2	The Speed of Sound Waves 418
	12.3	Amplitude and Intensity of Sound Waves 419
	12.4	Standing Sound Waves 424
	12.5	Timbre 428
	12.6	The Human Ear 429
	12.7	Beats 431
	12.8	The Doppler Effect 433
	12.9	Shock Waves 437
	12.10	Echolocation and Medical Imaging 438
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 9?12 449
PART TWO 
Thermal Physics
Chapter 13	Temperature and the Ideal Gas 453
	13.1	Temperature 454
	13.2	Temperature Scales 455
	13.3	Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids 456
	13.4	Molecular Picture of a Gas 460
	13.5	Absolute Temperature and the Ideal 
Gas Law 462
	13.6	Kinetic Theory of the Ideal Gas 466
	13.7	Temperature and Reaction Rates 471
	13.8	Collisions Between Gas Molecules 473
Chapter 14 	Heat 485
	14.1	Internal Energy 486
	14.2	Heat 488
	14.3	Heat Capacity and Specific Heat 490
	14.4	Specific Heat of Ideal Gases 493
	14.5	Phase Transitions 495
	14.6	Thermal Conduction 502
	14.7	Thermal Convection 505
	14.8	Thermal Radiation 508
Chapter 15 	Thermodynamics 523
	15.1	The First Law of Thermodynamics 524
	15.2	Thermodynamic Processes 525
	15.3	Thermodynamic Processes for an 
Ideal Gas 529
	15.4	Reversible and Irreversible Processes 532
	15.5	Heat Engines 533
	15.6	Refrigerators and Heat Pumps 536
	15.7	Reversible Engines and Heat Pumps 538
	15.8	Details of the Carnot Cycle 541
	15.9	Entropy 542
	15.10	Statistical Interpretation of Entropy 545
	15.11	The Third Law of Thermodynamics 547
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 13?15 557
PART THREE
Electromagnetism
Chapter 16 	Electric Forces 
and Fields 561
	16.1	Electric Charge 562
	16.2	Electrical Conductors and Insulators 565
	16.3	Coulomb?s Law 569
	16.4	The Electric Field 573
	16.5	Motion of a Point Charge in a Uniform 
Electric Field 580
	16.6	Conductors in Electrostatic 
Equilibrium 582
	16.7	Gauss?s Law for Electric Fields 585
Chapter 17	Electric Potential 599
	17.1	Electric Potential Energy 600
	17.2	Electric Potential 603
	17.3	The Relationship Between Electric 
Field and Potential 610
	17.4	Conservation of Energy for Moving 
Charges 613
	17.5	Capacitors 614
	17.6	Dielectrics 618
	17.7	Energy Stored in a Capacitor 623
Chapter 18 	Electric Current and Circuits 637
	18.1	Electric Current 638
	18.2	Emf and Circuits 640
	18.3	Microscopic View of Current in a Metal: 
The Free-Electron Model 642
	18.4	Resistance and Resistivity 644
	18.5	Kirchhoff?s Rules 650
	18.6	Series and Parallel Circuits 651
	18.7	Circuit Analysis Using Kirchhoff?s 
Rules 657
	18.8	Power and Energy in Circuits 659
	18.9	Measuring Currents and Voltages 661
	18.10	RC Circuits 663
	18.11	Electrical Safety 667
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 16?18 683
Chapter 19 	Magnetic Forces 
and Fields 687
	19.1	Magnetic Fields 688
	19.2	Magnetic Force on a Point Charge 692
	19.3	Charged Particle Moving Perpendicularly 
to a Uniform Magnetic Field 697
	19.4	Motion of a Charged Particle in a Uniform Magnetic Field: General 701
	19.5	A Charged Particle in Crossed #$E and 
#$B Fields 702
	19.6	Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying 
Wire 706
	19.7	Torque on a Current Loop 708
	19.8	Magnetic Field Due to an Electric 
Current 711
	19.9	Amp¿re?s Law 716
	19.10	Magnetic Materials 718
Chapter 20 	Electromagnetic 
Induction 733
	20.1	Motional Emf 734
	20.2	Electric Generators 737
	20.3	Faraday?s Law 740
	20.4	Lenz?s Law 745
	20.5	Back Emf in a Motor 747
	20.6	Transformers 748
	20.7	Eddy Currents 749
	20.8	Induced Electric Fields 751
	20.9	Mutual- and Self-Inductance 752
	20.10	LR Circuits 756
Chapter 21 	Alternating Current 771
	21.1	Sinusoidal Currents and Voltages; 
Resistors in ac Circuits 772
	21.2	Electricity in the Home 774
	21.3	Capacitors in ac Circuits 776
	21.4	Inductors in ac Circuits 779
	21.5	RLC Series Circuits 781
	21.6	Resonance in an RLC Circuit 785
	21.7	Converting ac to dc; Filters 787
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 19?21 797
PART FOUR
Electromagnetic Waves and Optics
Chapter 22	Electromagnetic 
Waves 801
	22.1	Accelerating Charges Produce Electromagnetic Waves 802
	22.2	Maxwell?s Equations 803
	22.3	Antennas 804
	22.4	The Electromagnetic Spectrum 807
	22.5	Speed of EM Waves in Vacuum 
and in Matter 811
	22.6	Characteristics of Electromagnetic Waves 
in Vacuum 815
	22.7	Energy Transport by EM Waves 817
	22.8	Polarization 821
	22.9	The Doppler Effect for EM Waves 828
Chapter 23 	Reflection and Refraction of Light 837
	23.1	Wavefronts, Rays, and Huygens?s 
Principle 838
	23.2	The Reflection of Light 841
	23.3	The Refraction of Light: Snell?s Law 842
	23.4	Total Internal Reflection 847
	23.5	Polarization by Reflection 852
	23.6	The Formation of Images Through Reflection or Refraction 853
	23.7	Plane Mirrors 856
	23.8	Spherical Mirrors 858
	23.9	Thin Lenses 864
Chapter 24 	Optical Instruments 879
	24.1	Lenses in Combination 880
	24.2	Cameras 883
	24.3	The Eye 886
	24.4	The Simple Magnifier 891
	24.5	Compound Microscopes 893
	24.6	Telescopes 895
	24.7	Aberrations of Lenses and Mirrors 899
Chapter 25 	Interference and Diffraction 909
	25.1	Constructive and Destructive Interference 910
	25.2	The Michelson Interferometer 914
	25.3	Thin Films 917
	25.4	Young?s Double-Slit Experiment 922
	25.5	Gratings 926
	25.6	Diffraction and Huygens?s Principle 929
	25.7	Diffraction by a Single Slit 931
	25.8	Diffraction and the Resolution 
of Optical Instruments 935
	25.9	X-Ray Diffraction 937
	25.10	Holography 939
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 22?25 950
PART FIVE
Quantum and Particle Physics and Relativity
Chapter 26 	Relativity 953
	26.1	Postulates of Relativity 954
	26.2	Simultaneity and Ideal Observers 957
	26.3	Time Dilation 960
	26.4	Length Contraction 963
	26.5	Velocities in Different Reference Frames 965
	26.6	Relativistic Momentum 967
	26.7	Mass and Energy 969
	26.8	Relativistic Kinetic Energy 971
Chapter 27 	Early Quantum Physics and the Photon 983
	27.1	Quantization 984
	27.2	Blackbody Radiation 984
	27.3	The Photoelectric Effect 985
	27.4	X-Ray Production 991
	27.5	Compton Scattering 992
	27.6	Spectroscopy and Early Models 
of the Atom 994
	27.7	The Bohr Model of the Hydrogen Atom; Atomic Energy Levels 998
	27.8	Pair Annihilation and Pair Production 1005
Chapter 28 	Quantum Physics 1015
	28.1	The Wave-Particle Duality 1016
	28.2	Matter Waves 1017
	28.3	Electron Microscopes 1020
	28.4	The Uncertainty Principle 1022
	28.5	Wave Functions for a Confined Particle 1024
	28.6	The Hydrogen Atom: Wave Functions and Quantum Numbers 1026
	28.7	The Exclusion Principle; Electron 
Configurations for Atoms Other Than Hydrogen 1028
	28.8	Electron Energy Levels in a Solid 1032
	28.9	Lasers 1034
	28.10	Tunneling 1038
Chapter 29 	Nuclear Physics 1049
	29.1	Nuclear Structure 1050
	29.2	Binding Energy 1053
	29.3	Radioactivity 1057
	29.4	Radioactive Decay Rates and Half-Lives 1063
	29.5	Biological Effects of Radiation 1069
	29.6	Induced Nuclear Reactions 1073
	29.7	Fission 1075
	29.8	Fusion 1080
Chapter 30 	Particle Physics 1089
	30.1	Fundamental Particles 1090
	30.2	Fundamental Interactions 1092
	30.3	Unification 1095
	30.4	Particle Accelerators 1097
	30.5	Twenty-First-Century Particle Physics 1098
Review and Synthesis: Chapters 26?30 1102
Appendix A	
Mathematics Review A-1
Appendix B	
Table of Selected Nuclides A-15
Answers to Selected Questions and Problems AP-1
Credits C-1
Index I-1
LIST OF SELECTED APPLICATIONS
		# 
Biology/Life Science 
Energy transformation in a jumping flea, Section 6.7, p. 205 
Energy conversion in animal jumping, Example 6.12, p. 205 
Flexor versus extensor muscles, Section 8.5, p. 275 
Force to hold arm horizontal, Section 8.10, p. 276 
Forces on the human spine during heavy lifting, Section 8.5, p. 278
Sphygmomanometer and blood pressure, Section 9.5, p. 320
Floating and sinking of fish and animals, Example 9.8, p. 324 
Speed of blood flow, Example 9.9, p. 326 
Plaque buildup and narrowed arteries, Section 9.8, p. 330 
Narrowing arteries and high blood pressure, Section 9.9, p. 333 
Arterial blockage, Example 9.12, p. 333 
How insects can walk on the surface of a pond, Section 9.11, p. 336 
Surfactant in the lungs, Section 9.11, p. 336 
Surface tension of alveoli in the lungs, Example 9.14, p. 337 
Tension and compression in bone, Example 10.2, p. 352 
Osteoporosis, Section 10.3, p. 353 
Size limitations on organisms, Section 10.3, p. 355 
Comparison of walking speeds for various creatures, Example 10.10, p. 371 
Sensitivity of the human ear, Section 11.1, p. 387 
Sound waves from a songbird, Example 12.2, p. 420 
Human ear, Section 12.6, p. 429 
Echolocation of bats and dolphins, Section 12.10, p. 438 
Medical applications of ultrasound, ultrasonic imaging, Section 12.10, p. 439 
Evolutionary advantages of warm-blooded versus cold-blooded animals, Example 13.8, p. 471; 
Section 13.7, p. 472 
Diffusion of oxygen into the bloodstream, Section 13.8 and Example 13.10, p. 475 
Using ice to protect buds from freezing, Section 14.5, p. 496 
Thermography, Section 14.8, p. 510 
Thermal radiation from the human body, Example 14.15, p. 511 
Electrolocation in fish, Section 16.4, p. 579 
Transmission of nerve impulses, Section 17.2, p. 609 
Electrocardiogram (EKG) and electroencephalogram (EEG), Section 17.2, p. 609 
Neuron capacitance, Example 17.11, p. 621 
Defibrillator, Example 17.12, p. 624; Section 18.11, p. 667
Simplified electrical model of a myelinated axon, Section 18.10, p. 666 
Magnetotactic bacteria, Section 19.1, p. 691 
Medical uses of cyclotrons, Section 19.3, p. 699 
Electromagnetic blood flowmeter, Section 19.5, p. 704 
Magnetoencephalography, Section 20.3, p. 744 
Thermograms of the human body, Section 22.4, p. 808 
Fluorescence, Section 22.4, p. 809 
X-rays in medicine and dentistry, CAT scans, Section 22.4, p. 810 
Navigation of bees, Section 22.8, p. 827 
Endoscope, Section 23.4, p. 852 
Human eye, Section 24.3, p. 886 
Correcting myopia/hyperopia, Section 24.3, pp. 888?889; Example 24.4, p. 889; Example 24.5, p. 890
Iridescent colors in butterfly wings, Section 25.3, p. 921 
Resolution of the human eye, Section 25.8, p. 937 
Positron emission tomography (PET) scans, Section 27.8, p. 1006; Section 29.5, p. 1072
Electron microscopes, Section 28.3, p. 1020 
Laser Surgery, Section 28.9, p. 1037 
Radiocarbon dating, Section 29.4, p. 1066 
Biological effect of radiation, Section 29.5, p. 1069 
Radioactive tracers in medical diagnosis, Section 29.5, p. 1072 
Radiation therapy, Section 29.5, p. 1073 
Gamma knife radiosurgery, Section 29.5, p. 1073 
Chemistry 
Collision between krypton atom and water molecule, Example 7.9, p. 239 
Why reaction rates increase with temperature, Section 13.7, Example 13.8, p. 471 
Polarization of charge in water, Section 16.1, p. 565 
Current in electrolytes, Section 18.1, p. 639 
Spectroscopic analysis of elements, Section 27.6, p. 996 
Electronic configurations of atoms, Section 28.7, p. 1029 
Periodic table, Section 28.7, p. 1030 
Geology/Earth Science 
Angular speed of Earth, Example 5.1, p. 145 
Hidden depths of an iceberg, Example 9.7, p. 322 
Why ocean waves approach shore nearly head on, Section 11.8, p. 399 
Ocean currents and global warming, Section 14.7, p. 506 
Electric Potential Energy in a Thundercloud, Example 17.1, p. 601 
Thunderclouds and lightning, Section 17.6, p. 622 
Earth?s magnetic field, Section 19.1, p. 690 
Cosmic rays, Example 19.1, p. 694 
Magnetic force on an ion in the air, Example 19.2, p. 695 
Intensity of sunlight reaching the Earth, Example 22.6, p. 820 
Colors of the sky during the day and at sunset, Section 22.8, p. 826 
Rainbows, Section 23.3, p. 847 
Cosmic rays, Example 26.2, p. 965; Example 26.4, p. 968 
Radioactive dating of geologic formations, Section 29.4, p. 1068 
Neutron activation of geological objects, Section 29.6, p. 1075 
Astronomy/Space Science 
Speed of Hubble Telescope orbiting the Earth, Example 5.8, p. 157 
Kepler?s laws of planetary motion, Section 5.4, p. 158; Section 8.8, p. 286
Orbit of geostationary satellite, Example 5.9, p. 159 
Apparent weightlessness of orbiting astronauts, Section 5.7, p. 166 
Work done on an orbiting satellite, Section 6.2, p. 186 
Escape speed from Earth, Example 6.8, p. 199 
Center of mass of a binary star system, Example 7.7, p. 234 
Motion of an exploding model rocket, Example 7.8, p. 236 
Orbital speed of Earth, Example 8.15, p. 287 
Composition of planetary atmospheres, Section 13.6, p. 470 
Temperature of the Sun, Example 14.14, p. 509 
Global warming and the greenhouse effect, Section 14.8, p. 512 
Aurorae on Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, Section 19.4, p. 702 
Cosmic microwave background radiation, Section 22.4, p. 810 
Light from a supernova, Example 22.2, p. 813 
Doppler shift for distant stars and galaxies, Section 22.9, p. 830 
Reflecting telescopes, Section 24.6, p. 897 
Hubble Space Telescope, Section 24.6, p. 898 
Radio telescopes, Section 24.7, p. 899 
Observing active galactic nuclei, Section 26.2, p. 959 
Aging of astronauts during space voyages, Example 26.1, p. 962 
Nuclear fusion in stars, Section 29.8, p. 1081 
The Big Bang and the history of the universe, Section 30.3, p. 1095 
Architecture 
Cantilever building construction, Section 8.4, p. 269 
Strength of building materials, Section 10.3, p. 353 
Vibration of a bridge, Section 10.10, p. 374 
Expansion joints in bridges and buildings, Section 13.3, p. 457 
Heat transfer through window glass, Example 14.10, p. 503; Example 14.11, p. 504
Technology/Machines 
Advantages of a pulley, Section 2.8, p. 53 
Catapults and projectile motion, Example 4.9, p. 123 
Products to protect the human body from injury, Example 7.2, p. 225 
Safety features in a modern car, Section 7.3, p. 226 
Recoil of a rifle, Section 7.4, p. 232 
Atwood?s machine, Example 8.2, p. 260 
Angular momentum of a gyroscope, Section 8.9, p. 287 
Hydraulic lift, Example 9.2, p. 314 
Mercury manometer, Example 9.5, p. 318 
Venturi meter, Example 9.11, p. 329 
Sedimentation velocity and centrifuge, Section 9.10, p. 335 
Operation of sonar, Section 12.10, p. 439 
Bimetallic strip in a thermostat, Section 13.3, p. 459 
Operation of an internal combustion engine, Section 15.5, p. 534 
Efficiency of a heat engine, Section 15.5, p. 535 
Photocopier, Section 16.2, p. 568 
Cathode ray tube, Example 16.8, p. 580 
Electrostatic shielding, Section 16.6, p. 583 
Lightning rods, Section 16.6, p. 584 
Electrostatic precipitator, Section 16.6, p. 585 
Battery-powered lantern, Example 17.3, p. 604 
van de Graaff generator, Section 17.2, p. 607 
Computer keyboard, Example 17.9, p. 616 
Condenser microphone, Section 17.5, p. 617 
Random-access memory (RAM) chips, Section 17.5, p. 617 
Camera flash attachments, Section 17.5, p. 618; Section 18.10, p. 666
Electron drift velocity in household wiring, Example 18.2, p. 644 
Resistance thermometer, Section 18.4, p. 647 
Battery connection in a flashlight, Section 18.6, p. 652 
Household wiring, Section 18.11, p. 668; Section 21.2, p. 774
Magnetic compass, Section 19.1, p. 689 
Bubble chamber, Section 19.3, p. 697 
Mass spectrometer, Section 19.3, p. 698 
Proton cyclotron, Example 19.5, p. 700 
Electric motor (dc), Section 19.7, p. 710 
Galvanometer, Section 19.7, p. 710 
Audio speakers, Section 19.7, p. 711 
Electromagnets, Section 19.10, p. 720 
Computer hard disks, magnetic tape, Section 19.10, p. 720 
Electric generators, Section 20.2, p. 737 
Ground fault interrupter, Section 20.3, p. 744 
Moving coil microphone, Section 20.3, p. 744 
Back emf in a motor, Section 20.5, p. 747 
Transformers, Section 20.6, p. 748 
Electric power distribution, Section 20.6, p. 749 
Eddy-current braking, Section 20.7, p. 750 
Induction stove, Section 20.7, p. 751 
Radio tuning circuit, Example 21.3, p. 780, Example 21.6, p. 786 
Laptop computer power supply, Example 21.5, p. 784 
Diodes and rectifiers, Section 21.7, p. 787 
Filters for audio tweeters and woofers, Section 21.7, p. 788 
Radio/TV antennas, Section 22.3, p. 805 
Microwave ovens, Section 22.4, p. 809 
Liquid crystal displays, Section 22.8, p. 825 
Radar guns, Example 22.9, p. 829 
Periscope, Section 23.4, p. 850 
Fiber optics, Section 23.4, p. 851 
Zoom lens, Example 23.9, p. 868 
Cameras, Section 24.2, p. 883 
Microscopes, Section 24.5, p. 893 
Telescopes, Section 24.6, p. 895 
Reading a compact disk (CD), Section 25.1, p. 914 
Michelson interferometer, Section 25.2, p. 914 
Interference microscope, Section 25.2, p. 916 
Antireflective coating, Section 25.3, p. 921 
CD player tracking, Section 25.5, p. 927 
Grating spectroscope, Section 25.5, p. 928 
Diffraction and photolithography, Example 25.7, p. 930 
Resolution of a laser printer, Example 25.9, p. 936 
X-ray diffraction, Section 25.9, p. 937 
Photocells used for sound tracks, burglar alarms, garage door openers, Section 27.3, p. 990 
Diagnostic x-rays in medicine, Example 27.4, p. 991
Lasers, Section 28.9, p. 1034 
Scanning tunneling microscope, Section 28.10, p. 1039 
Nuclear fission reactors, Section 29.7, p. 1078 
Nuclear fusion reactors, Section 29.8, p. 1082 
High-energy particle accelerators, Section 30.4, p. 1097 
Transportation 
Motion of a train, Section 3.1, p. 70 
Acceleration of a sports car, Example 3.7, p. 84 
Braking a car, Practice Problem 3.7, p. 86 
Relative velocities for pilots and sailors, Section 3.5, p. 94 
Airplane flight in a wind, Example 3.12, p. 94
Length of runway for airplane takeoff, Example 4.4, p. 113 
Angular speed of a motorcycle wheel, Example 5.3, p. 148 
Banked roadways, Section 5.3, p. 154 
Banking angle of an airplane, Section 5.3, p. 156 
Circular motion of stunt pilot, Example 5.14, p. 167 
Damage in a high-speed collision, Example 6.3, p. 191 
Power of a car climbing a hill, Example 6.13, p. 207 
Momentum of a moving car, Example 7.1, p. 224 
Force acting on a car passenger in a crash, Example 7.3, p. 227 
Jet, rockets, and airplane wings, Section 7.4, p. 232 
Torque on a spinning bicycle wheel, Example 8.3, p. 263 
Airplane wings and lift, Section 9.8, p. 330 
Shock absorbers in a car, Section 10.9, p. 373 
Shock wave of a supersonic plane, Section 12.9, p. 437 
Air temperature changes in car tires, Section 13.5, p. 464 
Efficiency of an automobile engine, Example 15.7, p. 540 
Starting a car using flashlight batteries, Example 18.5, p. 649 
Bicycle generator, Example 20.2, p. 739 
Sports 
Velocity and acceleration of an inline skater, Example 3.6, p. 83 
Terminal speed of skydivers, Example 4.13, p. 130 
The hammer throw, Example 5.5, p. 151 
Bungee jumping, Example 6.4, p. 191 
Rock climbers rappelling, Example 6.5, p. 194 
Speed of a downhill skier, Example 6.6, p. 195 
Work done in drawing a bow, Section 6.6, p. 200; Example 6.9, p. 201 
Energy in a dart gun, Example 6.11, p. 204 
Elastic collision in a game of pool, Example 7.12, p. 243 
Muscle forces for the iron cross (gymnastics), Section 8.5, p. 277 
Rotational inertia of a figure skater, Section 8.7, p. 284 
Pressure on a diver, Example 9.3, p. 316 
Compressed air tanks for a scuba diver, Example 13.6, p. 465 
Everyday Life 
Buying clothes, unit conversions, Example 1.5, p. 9 
Hauling a crate up to a third-floor window, Example 4.2, p. 110 
Apparent weight in an elevator, Example 4.12, p. 128 
Circular motion of a CD, Example 5.4, p. 150 
Speed of roller coaster car in vertical loop, Example 5.11, p. 162 
Circular motion of a potter?s wheel, Example 5.13, p. 165 
Antique chest delivery, Example 6.1, p. 186 
Pulling a sled through snow, Example 6.2, p. 189 
Getting down to nuts and bolts, Example 6.10, p. 202 
Motion of a raft on a still lake, Example 7.5, p. 231 
Automatic screen door closer, Example 8.4, p. 265 
Work done on a potter?s wheel, Example 8.5, p. 267 
Climbing a ladder on a slippery floor, Example 8.7, p. 270 
Pushing a file cabinet so it doesn?t tip, Example 8.9, p. 273 
Torque on a grinding wheel, Example 8.11, p. 280 
Pressure exerted by wearing high-heeled shoes, Example 9.1, p. 311 
Cutting action of a pair of scissors, Example 10.4, p. 357 
Difference between musical sound and noise, Section 11.4, p. 391 
Sound of a horn in air and water, Example 11.5, p. 398 
Sound from a guitar, Section 12.1, p. 416 
Sound from a loudspeaker, Section 12.1, p. 416 
Sound intensity of a jackhammer, Example 12.3, p. 421 
Sources of musical sound, Section 12.4, p. 424 
Tuning a piano, Section 12.7, p. 432; Example 12.7, p. 433 
Temperature conversion, Example 13.1, p. 456 
Chill caused by perspiration, Section 14.5, p. 500 
Offshore and onshore breezes, Section 14.7, p. 505 
Double-paned windows and down jackets, Section 14.7, p. 505 
Static charge from walking across a carpet, Example 16.1, p. 563 
Electrostatic charge of adhesive tape, Section 16.2, p. 568 
Colors from reflection and absorption of light, Section 23.1, p. 838 
Mirages, Section 23.3, p. 846 
Height needed for a full-length mirror, Example 23.5, p. 857 
Shaving or cosmetic mirrors, Section 23.8, p. 860 
Side-view mirrors on cars, Example 23.7, p. 863 
Colors in soap films, oil slicks, Section 25.3, p. 917 
Neon signs, Section 27.6, p. 995 
Fluorescent dyes in laundry detergent, Section 27.7, p. 1003 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Physics -- Textbooks.