Table of contents for Mostly harmless econometrics : an empiricist's companion / Joshua D. Angrist, Jáeorn-Steffen Pischke.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Contents
Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Organization of this Book xv
I Introduction 1
1 Questions about Questions 3
2 The Experimental Ideal 9
2.1 The Selection Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 Random Assignment Solves the Selection Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.3 Regression Analysis of Experiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
II The Core 19
3 Making Regression Make Sense 21
3.1 Regression Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.1.1 Economic Relationships and the Conditional Expectation Function . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.1.2 Linear Regression and the CEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.1.3 Asymptotic OLS Inference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.1.4 Saturated Models, Main E?ects, and Other Regression Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.2 Regression and Causality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.2.1 The Conditional Independence Assumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.2.2 The Omitted Variables Bias Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.2.3 Bad Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.3 Heterogeneity and Nonlinearity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
3.3.1 Regression Meets Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
iii
iv CONTENTS
3.3.2 Control for Covariates Using the Propensity Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.3.3 Propensity-Score Methods vs. Regression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
3.4 Regression Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.4.1 Weighting Regression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.4.2 Limited Dependent Variables and Marginal E?ects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
3.4.3 Why is Regression Called Regression and What Does Regression-to-the-mean Mean? . 80
3.5 Appendix: Derivation of the average derivative formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4 Instrumental Variables in Action: Sometimes You Get What You Need 83
4.1 IV and causality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4.1.1 Two-Stage Least Squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
4.1.2 The Wald Estimator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.1.3 Grouped Data and 2SLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
4.2 Asymptotic 2SLS Inference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
4.2.1 The Limiting Distribution of the 2SLS Coe? cient Vector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
4.2.2 Over-identi.cation and the 2SLS MinimandF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
4.3 Two-Sample IV and Split-Sample IVF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
4.4 IV with Heterogeneous Potential Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
4.4.1 Local Average Treatment E?ects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
4.4.2 The Compliant Subpopulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
4.4.3 IV in Randomized Trials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
4.4.4 Counting and Characterizing Compliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
4.5 Generalizing LATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
4.5.1 LATE with Multiple Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
4.5.2 Covariates in the Heterogeneous-e?ects Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
4.5.3 Average Causal Response with Variable Treatment IntensityF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
4.6 IV Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
4.6.1 2SLS Mistakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
4.6.2 Peer E?ects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
4.6.3 Limited Dependent Variables Reprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
4.6.4 The Bias of 2SLSF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
4.7 Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
5 Parallel Worlds: Fixed E?ects, Di?erences-in-di?erences, and Panel Data 165
5.1 Individual Fixed E?ects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
5.2 Di?erences-in-di?erences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
CONTENTS v
5.2.1 Regression DD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
5.3 Fixed E?ects versus Lagged Dependent Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
5.4 Appendix: More on .xed e?ects and lagged dependent variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
III Extensions 187
6 Getting a Little Jumpy: Regression Discontinuity Designs 189
6.1 Sharp RD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
6.2 Fuzzy RD is IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
7 Quantile Regression 203
7.1 The Quantile Regression Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
7.1.1 Censored Quantile Regression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
7.1.2 The Quantile Regression Approximation PropertyF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
7.1.3 Tricky Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
7.2 Quantile Treatment E?ects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
7.2.1 The QTE Estimator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
8 Nonstandard Standard Error Issues 221
8.1 The Bias of Robust Standard ErrorsF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
8.2 Clustering and Serial Correlation in Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
8.2.1 Clustering and the Moulton Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
8.2.2 Serial Correlation in Panels and Di?erence-in-Di?erence Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
8.2.3 Fewer than 42 clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
8.3 Appendix: Derivation of the simple Moulton factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Last words 245
Acronyms 247
Empirical Studies Index 251
Notation 253

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Econometrics.
Regression analysis.