Table of contents for Biotechnology / John E. Smith.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Preface page xi
Chapter 1 The nature of biotechnology 1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 What is biotechnology? 2
1.3 Biotechnology: an interdisciplinary pursuit 6
1.4 Biotechnology: a three-component central core 13
1.5 Product safety 15
1.6 Public perception of biotechnology 17
1.7 Biotechnology and the developing world 17
Chapter 2 Biomass: a biotechnology substrate? 19
2.1 A biomass strategy 19
2.2 Natural raw materials 21
2.3 Availability of by-products 23
2.4 Raw materials and the future of biotechnology 25
Chapter 3 Genetics and biotechnology 29
3.1 Introduction 29
3.2 Industrial genetics 31
3.3 Protoplast and cell fusion technologies 32
3.4 Genetic engineering 35
3.5 The polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing 41
3.6 Nucleic acid probes 43
3.7 Genomics and proteomics 44
3.8 Antisense and RNA interference 45
3.9 Systems biology 47
3.10 Potential laboratory biohazards of genetic engineering 47
Chapter 4 Bioprocess/fermentation technology 49
4.1 Introduction 49
4.2 Principles of microbial growth 53
4.3 The bioreactor 57
4.4 Scale-up 63
4.5 Media design for fermentation processes 63
4.6 Solid substrate fermentation 65
4.7 Technology of mammalian and plant cell culture 67
4.8 Metabolic engineering 70
4.9 Downstream processing 71
Chapter 5 Enzyme technology 73
5.1 The nature of enzymes 73
5.2 The application of enzymes 75
5.3 Selection and development of producer strains for
enzyme production 81
5.4 The technology of enzyme production 84
5.5 Immobilised enzymes 88
Chapter 6 Biological fuel generation 95
6.1 Global warming and the signi.cance of fossil fuels 95
6.2 Photosynthesis: the ultimate energy source 96
6.3 Biofuels from biomass 97
6.4 Bioethanol from biomass 99
6.5 Biodiesel 103
6.6 Methane 104
6.7 Hydrogen 107
6.8 The way ahead for biofuels 108
6.9 Contrasting views on climate change 109
Chapter 7 Environmental biotechnology 110
7.1 Introduction 110
7.2 Microbial ecology/environmental biotechnology 112
7.3 Waste-water and sewage treatment 113
7.4 Land.ll technologies 118
7.5 Composting 119
7.6 Bioremediation 122
7.7 Detection and monitoring of pollutants 126
7.8 Microbes and the geological environment 126
7.9 Environmental sustainability and clean technology 130
Chapter 8 Plant and forest biotechnology 133
8.1 Introduction 133
8.2 Plant biotechnology 134
8.3 Forest biotechnology 146
Chapter 9 Animal and insect biotechnology 149
9.1 Introduction 149
9.2 Genetic manipulation and transgenic animals 150
9.3 Genetically engineered hormones and vaccines 154
9.4 Animal organs for human patients 156
9.5 Genetically modi.ed insects 157
9.6 A look to the future 157
9.7 Diagnostics in plant and animal agriculture 158
Chapter 10 Food and beverage biotechnology 161
10.1 Introduction 161
10.2 Food and beverage fermentations 164
10.3 Microorganisms as food 178
10.4 Enzymes and food processing 185
10.5 Amino acids, vitamins and sweeteners 186
10.6 Organic acids and polysaccharides 188
10.7 Rapid diagnostics 188
10.8 Bioprocess technology 189
10.9 Public acceptance and safety of new biotechnology
foods 189
Chapter 11 Biotechnology and medicine 190
11.1 Introduction 190
11.2 Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals 192
11.3 Antibiotics 193
11.4 Vaccines and monoclonal antibodies 196
11.5 Biopharmaceuticals/therapeutic proteins 201
11.6 Pharmacogenetics 205
11.7 Molecular biology and human disease 206
11.8 Diagnostics in developing countries 206
11.9 Gene therapy 207
11.10 Systems biology and medicine 209
Chapter 12 Stem cell biotechnology 211
12.1 The nature of stem cells 211
12.2 Stem cell cultivation 213
12.3 Human--animal embryos 215
12.4 Commercial potential for stem cell therapies 216
Chapter 13 Protection of biotechnological inventions 218
13.1 Introduction 218
13.2 Patent protection 219
13.3 Trade secrets 222
13.4 Plant breeders rights 223
Chapter 14 Safety in biotechnology 224
14.1 Introduction 224
14.2 Concepts of hazard and risk 224
14.3 Problems of organism pathogenicity 225
14.4 Problems of biologically active biotechnology products 227
14.5 Biowarfare and bioterrorism 228
Chapter 15 Public perception of biotechnology: genetic
engineering -- safety, social, moral and
ethical considerations 232
15.1 Introduction 232
15.2 Release of genetically manipulated organisms into the
environment 234
15.3 Gene modi.cation and food uses 236
15.4 The applications of human genetic research 242
Chapter 16 Looking to the future 245
Glossary 250
Further reading 254
Index 262

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Biotechnology.