Table of contents for Contemporary views on architecture and representations in phonology / edited by Eric Raimy and Charles E. Cairns.

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Contributors								xv
Acknowledgements							xxii
Chapter 1	Architecture and representations in phonology
Charles Cairns and Eric Raimy
1.1	Architecture and representations in phonology	
	1
1.2	Phonetics and Phonology as Distinct Components	
	3
1.3	Modularity within Phonology: The Syllable and the 
Foot	7
1.4	Modularity producing emergent phenomena		
	18
1.5	Organization of the volume				
	24
	1.5.1	Features						24
	1.5.2	The syllable					
	26
	1.5.3	Stress						
	28
	1.5.4	Architecture					
	30
	1.5.5	Interactions					
	32
References								35
Phonological Features
Chapter 2	The role of features in phonological 
inventories
G. Nick Clements
2.1	Introduction							39
2.2	Features: Their nature and cognitive status		
	43
2.3	Data and method						49
2.4	Feature bounding						53
2.5	Feature economy						59
2.6	Marked feature avoidance					68
	2.6.1	Markedness and feature economy		
	68
	2.6.2	Which value of a feature is marked?	
		72
	2.6.3	Marked feature avoidance			
	80
	2.6.4	Marked segment types appear in larger 
inventories	87
	2.6.5	Summary						91
2.7	Robustness							91
2.8	Phonological enhancement					106
2.9	Illustrations							115
2.10	Summary and discussion					119
Notes									126
References								137
Chapter 3	Commentary on Clements
Morris Halle								158
References								166
Chapter 4	The role of features in a symbolic theory of 
phonology: comments on Clements
Bert Vaux								169
4.1	Faulty Database						174
	4.1.1	Phonetics						175
	4.1.2	Phonology						179
	4.1.3	Summary of database flaws			
	182
4.2	Problems with the feature set				
	183
4.3	Markedness							185
4.4	What and where is economy?				188
4.5	Conclusions							190
Notes									193
References								196
The Syllable
Chapter 5	The appendix
Bert Vaux and Andrew Wolfe	
5.1	Introduction							232
	5.1.1	Delimiting the discussion			
	236
5.2	Complex onsets and codas					240
5.3	The appendix							244
	5.3.1	Evidence for the appendix			
	245
	5.3.1.1	External evidence				
	246
	5.3.1.1.1	Child language errors			
	246
	5.3.1.1.2	Aphasic speech				247
	5.3.1.1.3	Psycholinguistic evidence		
	248
	5.3.1.1.4	Typology					250
	5.3.1.1.5	Metrical scansion				251
	5.3.1.2	Internal evidence				
	251
	5.3.1.2.1	Phonetics					252
	5.3.1.2.2	Phonotactics and sonority		
	253
	5.3.1.2.3	Phonological rules				254
	5.3.1.2.4	Syllable weight				257
	5.3.1.2.5	Rules that refer to syllable affiliation 
or position	259
	5.3.1.2.6	Prosodic morphological processes	
	262
	5.3.1.2.6.1	Reduplication				
	263
	5.3.1.2.6.2	Infixation				
	265
	5.3.1.2.6.3	Morpheme selection			
	267
	5.3.2	Formal representation of the appendix	
	269
5.4	Degenerate syllables					
	273
5.5	Conclusions							284
Notes									286
References								299
Chapter 6	Phonological representations and the Vaux-
Wolfe Proposal
Charles Cairns								326
6.1	Prosodic licensing						328
6.2	The prosodic hierarchy and 3-D phonology		
	330
6.3	The internal structure of the syllable			
	338
6.4	The sonority sequencing principle			
	345
6.5	Reanalysis of the Rialland facts			
	353
6.6	Conclusion							356
Notes									359
References								363
Chapter 7	Does sonority have a phonetic basis?
G. Nick Clements 							370
Notes									390
References								391
Chapter 8	A case of appendicitis
Eric Raimy								396
8.1	Reduplication and infixation in Nxaʿamcán		
	397
8.2	Reduplication in Thao					410
8.3	Conclusion							413
Notes									415
References								417
Metrical Structure
Chapter 9	Calculating metrical structure
William J. Idsardi 
9.1	Introduction							419
9.2	Rules and machines						419
9.3	Case studies							431
	9.3.1	Old English					
	431
	9.3.2	Auca							433
	9.3.3	Winnebago						435
	9.3.4	Tripura Bangla					436
9.4	Automata for Optimality Theory			
	440
9.5	Conclusions							442
References								444
Chapter 10 	Stress assignment in Tiberian Hebrew
B. Elan Dresher 
10.1	Introduction							448
10.2	Earlier approaches: Metrical overwriting		
	449
10.3	An SBG analysis						457
10.4	The opacity of metrical structure assignment in 
Tiberian Hebrew	460
Notes									463
References								464
Chapter 11	Brackets and grid marks, or theories of 
primary accent and rhythm
Harry van der Hulst 
11.1	Introduction							468
11.2	Word accentuation						469
	11.2.1	Standard metrical theory			
	469
	11.2.2	Reversing the order of things and why	
	470
	11.2.3	Primary accent theory: How does it work?
		476
11.3	Bounded systems						479
	11.3.1	Weight-sensitive bounded systems		
	479
	11.3.2	Weight-insensitive bounded systems		
	482
11.4	Unbounded systems						484
11.5	Constituent structure					
	487
11.6	Count systems							489
11.7	Simplified Bracketed Grid theory (Idsardiâ¿¿s 
system)	495
11.8	Conclusions							501
Notes									503
References								505
Chapter 12	Long distance dependencies and other 
formal issues in phonology
Charles Reiss 	
12.1	Introduction							513
12.2	Idsardiâ¿¿s appeal to Finite State Automata		
	513
	12.2.1	Neutral vowels and Finite State Automata
		513
	12.2.2	Natural classes and FSAs			
	517
12.3	Directionality and foot boundaries			
	520
	12.3.1	Directionality in the Halle and Idsardi 
model	522
12.4	Nondirected foot boundary markers			
	523
12.5	Undesirably footed marks					525
12.6	Conclusions							530
Notes									533
References								534
Architecture 
Chapter 13	Markedness theory vs. phonological 
Idiosyncracies in a realistic model of language
Andrea Calabrese	
13.1	Introduction							536
13.2	The markedness module					540
13.3	The rule component						556
13.4	More on the markedness module				559
13.5	Visibility theory and spotlighting			
	571
13.6	Derivations							577
13.7	Historical changes						590
13.8	Conclusion							596
Notes									598
References								603
Chapter 14	Comments on diachrony in Calabreseâ¿¿s 
â¿¿Markedness Theory vs. Phonological Idiosyncracies in a 
Realistic Model of Languageâ¿¥
Ellen Kaisse								615
Notes									628
References								630
Chapter 15	Nuancing markedness: a place for 
contrast
Keren Rice	
15.1	Overview of â¿¿ Markedness theory vs. phonological 
idiosyncrasies in a realistic model of phonologyâ¿¿		
				632
15.2	Substance and markedness in phonology		
	633
15.3	Substance and markedness in sound changes	
	634
15.4	Substance, markedness and contrast in phonology	
	641
15.5	Conclusion							647
References								649
Interactions 
Chapter 16 	Phonetic explanations for recurrent 
sound patterns: Diachronic or Synchronic?
Juliette Blevins 
16.1	Sources of similarity					
	657
16.2	Phonetic explanation					
	661
16.3	Modeling phonological knowledge			
	672
16.4	Concluding remarks						676
References								679
Chapter 17 	Phonetic influence on phonological 
operations
Thomas Purnell
17.1	Introduction							687
17.2	Predictive power						693
17.3	Layering and selection of phonetic cues		
	708
17.4	Conclusion							716
Notes									720
References								723
Chapter 18	Rule application in phonology
Morris Halle and Andrew Nevins
18.1	Introduction							736
18.2	The Regularity of Morphological Structure (and how 
it may be obscured)
									740
18.3	Exceptional Rule Non-Application in the Czech 
Declension
									755
18.4	Cyclic and Post-Cyclic Rule Interaction in the 
Serbo-Croatian Genitive Plural					
				767
Notes									780
References								786
Chapter 19	Deriving reduplicative templates in a 
modular fashion
Eric Raimy								791
19.1	Formal underpinnings of a theory of reduplication	
	792
19.2	Organic constraint I: grammatical architecture	
	800
19.3	Organic constraint II: phonological computation	
	808
19.4	Organic constraint III: language acquisition		
	817
19.5	Conclusions							828
References								830
Index

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Grammar, Comparative and general -- Phonology -- Methodology.