Table of contents for Human rights, intervention and the use of force / Philip Alston and Euan Macdonald (eds).

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Contents
List of Abbreviations xi
List of Contributors xiii
1. Sovereignty, Human Rights, Security: Armed Intervention and the Foundational Problems of International Law 1
Euan MacDonald and Philip Alston
2. Human Rights and State Sovereignty: Have the Boundaries been Significantly Redrawn? 33
Helene Ruiz Fabri
3. Human Rights and Collective Security: Is There an Emerging Right of Humanitarian Intervention? 87
Olivier Corten
4. The Implications of Kosovo for International Human Rights Law 139
Richard B Bilder
5. Can Uses of Force be Illegal but Justified? 179
Anthea Roberts
6. Intervention in a 'Divided World': Axes of Legitimacy 227
Nathaniel Berman
7. States of Exception: Regulating Targeted Killing in a 'Global Civil War' 255
Nehal Bhuta
8. The Schizophrenias of R2P 287
Jose E Alvarez
Index 000
Contents
List of Abbreviations xii
List of Contributors xiii
1. Sovereignty, Human Rights, Security: Armed Intervention and the Foundational Problems of International Law 1
1. Introduction: Three Foundational Problems 1
2. The Foundational Challenges and the Use of Force 7
3. Sovereignty and Human Rights: The Conceptual/Legal Background 11
4. Broadening the Analysis: Legality, Legitimacy-and Security 16
5. Conclusion: Armed Intervention and the Ethics of International Law 28
2. Human Rights and State Sovereignty: Have the Boundaries been Significantly Redrawn? 33
1. The Simple Correlation: Expansion of Human Rights and Limitation of Sovereignty 42
A. Types of Limitations: The Formal Question 43
B. Degrees of Limitation: The Substantive Question 53
2. Ambivalent Tendencies: The Evolution of Sovereignty and the 'Becoming' of Human Rights 67
A. Human Rights and the Preservation of Sovereignty 68
B. Human Rights and the Dilution of Sovereignty 79
3. Human Rights and Collective Security: Is There an Emerging Right of Humanitarian Intervention? 87
1. 'Humanitarian Interventions' prior to the Kosovo war 90
A. Precedents where the intervening powers based their actions on explicit authorizations from the Security Council 91
B. Precedents where the intervening powers were unable to base their actions on explicit authorization from the Security Council 97
2. The Precedent of Kosovo 108
A. The ambiguity of the official legal justifications for intervention 108
B. A relative, limited evolution of existing international law 112
3. After the Kosovo War 123
A. Repeated condemnations of the 'right of humanitarian intervention' 123
B. Obstacles to the early emergence of a 'right of humanitarian intervention' 133
4. The Implications of Kosovo for International Human Rights Law 139
1. Introduction
2. Kosovo, the UN and the Doctrine of Humanitarian Intervention 143
3. Kosovo and the Laws of War 153
4. Kosovo and International Criminal Law 159
5. Kosovo and International Political Stability 165
6. Kosovo, the Media and NGOs 167
7. Kosovo, Sovereignty, and Ethnic Conflict 173
8. Kosovo and the Future of International Human Rights Law 176
5. Can Uses of Force be Illegal but Justified? 179
1. Introduction 179
2. The Dilemma of Humanitarian Intervention 180
A. The Prohibition on the Use of Force 180
B. State Practice and Unilateral Humanitarian Intervention 181
C. Responses to Kosovo 183
3. A Critique of the 'Illegal but Justified' Approach 186
A. Loading the Language 186
B. Declaration of Illegality? 192
C. Mitigation or Justification? 196
D. Exception or Precedent? 201
E. Behavioural Claims and Policy Considerations 206
4. The Movement from Legality to Legitimacy 210
A. Changing the Paradigm of Debate 210
B. Legality versus Legitimacy? 214
C. Motivations Behind the Movement to Legitimacy 218
5. Conclusion 224
6. Intervention in a 'Divided World': Axes of Legitimacy 227
1. 'Status and Coherence' 227
A. The Internationalist Dream 227
B. Axes of Challenge, Axes of Competition 230
2. Status 233
3. Coherence 237
4. 'Our Law': Producing Unity through Heterogeneity 242
5. Coming to Terms with the Past: The Spectre of Fez 249
6. Legitimation Effects: Four Hypotheses 252
7. States of Exception: Regulating Targeted Killing in a 'Global Civil War' 255
1. Introduction 255
2. Targeted Killing and the 'War on Terrorism' 258
3. Overview of the Interaction between International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law 262
A. Three Articulations of the Relationship between IHL and IHR 263
B. The Indeterminacy of Lex Specialis 266
4. The Applicable Legal Regime for Targeted Killing: IHL, IHR or Both? 271
A. 'Global Civil War' and the Problems of Categorical Incoherence 271
B. Targeted Killing in IHL and IHR-Military Model vs. Law Enforcement 276
8. The Schizophrenias of R2P 287
1. The Redefinition of Sovereignty 290
2. The Expansion of What it Means to 'Protect' 292
3. The Expansion of Security 293
4. The Invocation of Legal Responsibility 293
5. Two Cheers for Humanitarian Intervention 295
Index 000

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Human rights.
Intervention (International law).
War (International law).
Humanitarian intervention.