Table of contents for US nuclear weapons policy after the cold war : Russians, "rogues" and domestic division / Nick Ritchie.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Introduction 1 The policy-making process Actors involved in nuclear weapons policy The annual nuclear policy budgetary process 2 American nuclear weapons policy at the end of the Cold War 3 Nuclear weapons policy under George H. W. Bush Key decisions Nuclear arms control Nuclear forces ¿Rogue¿ states and nuclear planning The nuclear weapons production complex Conclusion 4 Nuclear weapons policy under Bill Clinton Nuclear forces Nuclear arms control Russia, ¿rogues¿ and nuclear planning The nuclear weapons complex Conclusion 5 Nuclear weapons policy under George W. Bush Nuclear policy and the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review Nuclear forces Nuclear arms control The nuclear weapons production complex Conclusion 6 Post-Cold War trends in nuclear weapons policy 7 The influence of ideas on nuclear weapons policy Three competing ¿idea sets¿ Idea set 1: Managing the drawdown of Cold War nuclear forces Idea set 2: Responding to nuclear proliferation through progress in arms control and disarmament Idea set 3: Responding to nuclear proliferation by re-orienting Cold War nuclear weapons policy to a post-Cold War war-fighting policy Conclusion 8 Domestic politics and nuclear weapons policy Policy inertia Political disinterest in nuclear weapons policy Military disinterest in nuclear weapons policy Nuclear conservatism and neglect Conclusion Conclusion 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

United States -- Military policy.
Nuclear weapons -- Government policy -- United States.
National security -- United States.
World politics -- 1989-.