Table of contents for Energy in nature and society : general energetics of complex systems / Vaclav Smil.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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CONTENTS
PREFACE
1 THE UNIVERSAL LINK
 Energy and energetics 		
 1.1 Evolution of energetics: from Aristotle to Einstein 
 1.2 Approaches to understanding: concepts, variables, units 	
	
2 PLANETARY ENERGETICS
 Hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere 	
 2.1 Sun: the star and its radiation 		
 2.2 Energy balance of the Earth: radiation fluxes 		
 2.3 Hydrosphere and atmosphere: thermal and mass fluxes
 2.4 Water and air in motion: kinetic fluxes
 2.5 Geoenergetics: heat, plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes 
		
3 PHOTOSYNTHESIS
 Bioenergetics of primary production 		
 3.1 Photosynthetic pathways 		
 3.2 Global primary productivity
 3.3 Productivities of ecosystems and plants 
 3.4 Phytomass stores 		
 3.5 Autotrophic scaling
4 HETEROTROPHIC CONVERSIONS 
 Consumer bioenergetics 	
 4.1 Metabolic capabilities 		
 4.2 Ectotherms and endotherms 		
 4.3 Locomotion 	
 4.4 Biomasses and productivities 		
 4.5 Heterotrophs in ecosystems 		
5 HUMAN ENERGETICS
 Man as a simple heterotoph 		
 5.1 Energy sources and basal metabolism 		
 5.2 Requirements and uncertainties 		
 5.3 Thermoregulation 		
 5.4 Limits of human performance 		
 5.5 Gathering, hunting and fishing 		
6 TRADITIONAL FOOD PRODUCTION
 Man as a solar farmer
 6.1 Extensive practices 		
 6.2 Permanent cropping 
 6.3 Muscles, implements, machines 		
 6.4 Cropping intensification 		
 6.5 Traditional agricultures 		
 
7 PREINDUSTRIAL COMPLEXIFICATION
 Prime movers and fuels in traditional societies 		
 7.1 Animate power: human and animal muscles 	
 7.2 Water and wind: wheels and mills 		
 7.3 Phytomass fuels and metallurgy: wood, charcoal, crop residues 
 7.4 Construction: methods and structures 
 7.5 Transportation: roads and ships
8 FOSSIL FUELS
 Heat, light and prime movers 		
 8.1 Coals: the earliest modern fuels
 8.2 Hydrocarbons: crude oils and natural gases 		
 8.3 From extraction to combustion: modern fossil-fuel industries 
 8.4 Mechanical prime movers: engines and turbines 		
 8.5 Fossil-fueled electricity: generation and transmission 
9 FOSSIL-FUELLED CIVILIZATION
 Patterns and trends 			
 9.1 Fuels ad fossil-fueled electricity : Energy production and trade
 9.2 Non-fossil contributions: biomass and primary electricity 
 9.3 Global consumption patterns: growth and inequality 	
 9.4 Qualitative changes: transitions and efficiencies 	
 9.5 Energy conservation: gains and rebounds 
 			
10 ENERGY COSTS
 Valuations and changes 	 	
 10.1 Energy cost of energy: net gains 		
 10.2 Basic materials: from concrete to fertilizers 			
 10.3 Structures and products: from buildings to computers 	
 10.4 Crops and animal foods: subsidized diets 		
 10.5 Modern food system: gains, costs, efficiencies 		
11 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES 	
 Metabolism of fossil-fueled civilization
 11.1 Power densities: energy and land
 11.2 Energy conversions and heat rejection 		
 11.3 Energy and water
 11.4 Energy and the atmosphere: 
 11.5 Interferences in grand biospheric cycles 		
 
12 ENERGETIC CORRELATES 		
 Complexities of high-energy civilization
 12.1 Energy and the economy 		
 12.2 Energy and value 		
 12.3 Energy and the quality of life 		
 12.4 Energy and war 		
 12.5 Energy and the future
 
 13 GRAND PATTERNS 		
 Energetic (and other) essentials 
 13.1 Energy in the biosphere 		
 13.2 Energy and the civilization 		
 13.3 Challenges ahead
 
 APPENDICES
 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
 REFERENCES
 INDEX

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Bioenergetics.
Energy budget (Geophysics).