Table of contents for Word identification strategies : building phonics into a classroom reading program / Barbara J. Fox.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PREFACE
CHAPTER1
WORD IDENTIFICATION IN YOUR CLASSROOM READING PROGRAM			
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
C.	Why Do We Teach Phonics?
	1.	Phonics makes it easier to read and learn new words
	2.	Phonics helps children develop a large reading vocabulary
	3.	Phonics contributes to reading fluency
	4.	Phonics helps children become independent readers
D.	Word Identification in a Balanced Classroom Reading Program
	1.	When do we teach phonics?
	2.	How do we teach phonics?
		a.	Synthetic phonics
		b.	Analytic phonics
		c.	Embedded phonics
		d.	Analogy-based phonics
		e.	Structural analysis
	3.	How much time should we spend teaching phonics?
	4.	Under what circumstances should we teach phonics?
E.	Semantic, Syntactic and Graphophonic Cues
		a..	Semantic (meaning) cues
		b.	Syntactic (sentence structure) cues
		c.	Graphophonic (letter and sound) cues
F.	How Children Read Familiar and Unfamiliar Words
	1.	Sight words
	2.	Reading unfamiliar words
		a..	Analogy
		b.	Letter-sound strategy
		d.	Structural analysis strategy
G.	Metacognitive Awareness
H.	The Five Stages of Word Learning
	1.	Alphabetic
	2.	Partial Alphabetic
	3,	Alphabetic
	4.	Consolidated
	5.	Automatic
I.	References
CHAPTER 2
PHONEMIC AWARENESS: BECOMING AWARE OF THE SOUNDS OF LANGAUGE	
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
C.	What Is Phonemic Awareness?
D.	What Is Phonological Awareness?
E.	Phonemic Awareness and Phonics
F.	Phonemic Awareness Develops Sequentially]
G.	Teaching Phonemic Awareness in Your Classroom Reading Program
H.	Rhyme Awareness
	1.	How Children Demonstrate Rhyme Awareness
		a.	Identifying rhyming words
		b.	Thinking of rhyming words
		c.	Separating words into beginning sounds and rhyming sounds
	2.	Activities for Developing Rhyme Awareness
		a.	Predict rhyming sounds; Match rhyming words; Rhyming (or 
beginning sound) bookmark; Rhyming and beginning sound picture sorts; Rhyming picture-word mobiles; Rhyming picture collage; Draw rhyming pictures; Picture-rhyme memory game; Shoe box rhyme; Rhyme toss
b.	Spare minute activities for developing rhyme awareness
	Rhyming word lists; Rhyming chains;
Frame rhyming words; Use a puppet to peak interest in rhyme
I.	Phonemic Awareness
		a..	Phonemic awareness is important for reading and spelling
	1.	How Children Demonstrate Phonemic Awareness
		a.	Isolating sounds
		b.	Segmenting sounds
		c.	Manipulating sounds
		d.	Blending sounds
	2.	Best Practices for Developing Phonemic Awareness
		a.	Teach awareness of beginning sounds, followed by awareness of 
ending sounds, and then awareness of middle sounds
		b.	Teach phonemic awareness, letter names, and letter-sounds 
together
		c.	Teach one or two skills at a time
		d.	Teach phonemic awareness early, in kindergarten and first grade
		e.	Teach in small groups
		f.	Pace instruction to the needs of the child
		g.	Show children how to use phonemic awareness when reading and 
writing new words
h.	Begin with short, two-sound words
J.	Activities for Developing Phonemic Awareness
	1	Activities for developing rhyme awareness
.	2.	Activities for developing awareness of sounds
3.	Activities for developing blending
K.	Phonemic Awareness Tests
L.	Teaching Phonemic Awareness in Your Classroom Reading Program
M.	References
CHAPTER 3
EARLY WORD IDENTIFICATION STRATEGIES: USING LOGOS, PICTURES, WORD SHAPE, AND PARTIAL LETTER-SOUND ASSOCIATIONS TO READ NEW WORDS	
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
C.	Environmental Cues: The Strategy of Associating Meaning with the Print in Our 
	Everyday Surroundings
D.	Picture cues: The Strategy of Inferring meaning from illustrations
	1.	Configuration cues: The Strategy of Using word length, word shape, or 
		eye-catching letters to read new words
		a.	Word shape
		b.	Word length
		c.	Letter shape
E.	Prealphabetic Word Learners and Precommunicative Spellers
F.	Partial Alphabetic Cues: The Strategy of Using Letter-Names or One or Two 
	Letter-Sounds to Read New Words
G.	Partial Alphabetic Word Learners and Semiphonetic Spellers
H.	Best Practices for Teaching Partial Alphabetic Word Learners
	1.	Teach phonemic awareness of all the sounds in words¿first, middle, and 
Last
2.	Teach both consonant and vowel letter-sounds
3.	Have children read easy, meaningful text
4.	Ask questions that help children demonstrate and extend their knowledge 
	of written language
5.	Explore words
6.	Have children write everyday, and ask them to think about letters and 
	sounds when spelling new words
7.	Read aloud to children
H.	References
CHAPTER 4
ANALOGY-BASED PHONICS: THE STRATEGY OF USING PARTS OF FAMILIAR 
WORDS TO READ AND LEARN NEW WORDS							
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
C.	Looking Inside Syllables
D.	Teaching Analogy-based Phonics
E.	How Children Use the Onsets and Rimes in Known Words to Read New Words
F.	Self-monitoring, Cross-checking, and Self-correcting for Meaning-focused Word 
Identification
	1.	Cross-checking
	2.	Self-monitoring
	3.	Self-correcting
G.	Understanding Rimes, Phonograms, and Word Families
F.	Why Children Use Onsets and Rimes to Read and Learn New Words
G.	Best Practices for Teaching Analogy-based Phonics
	1.	Use clue words
	2.	Show children how to use the analogy strategy
	3.	Teach rimes from large, often-used word families
	4.	Teach rimes along with the letter-sound relationships within rimes
H.	Activities for Teaching Analogy-based Phonics
I.	Looking Beyond Analogy-based Phonics
J.	References
CHAPTER 5
LETTER-SOUND PHONICS: THE STRATEGY OF USING LETTER-SOUNDS TO READ 
AND LEARN NEW WORDS									
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
	1.	Phonics and fluency
C.	Phonics Letter-Sound Patterns
D.	Teaching Letter-Sound Phonics in Your Classroom
E.	How Children Use Letter-Sound Patterns to Read and Learn New Words
	1.	Correcting misidentifications
	2.	Minor mistakes
F.	Best Practices for Teaching Letter-Sound Phonics
	1.	Teach letter-sound patterns early
	2.	Teach directly
	3.	Follow a logical, planful sequence
	4.	Teach phonemic awareness, when needed
	5.	Pace instruction to the needs of each child
	6.	Teach the same letter-sound patterns in spelling as you teach in reading 
	7.	Integrate phonics into your classroom reading program
G.	A Sequence for Teaching Letter-Sound Patterns
	1.	Least challenging patterns
		a.	Single consonants
		b.	CVC short vowel pattern
	2.	Somewhat more challenging patterns
		a.	Consonant digraphs
		b.	Consonant clusters
		c.	VCe long vowel pattern
		d.	VV long vowel pattern
		e.	CV long vowel pattern
		f.	Double oo pattern
		g.	Diphthongs
	3.	Most challenging patterns
		a.	C or g plus a vowel
		b.	Vr vowel pattern
		c.	VCCe short vowel pattern
		d.	Au, aw, eu, ew patterns
H.	Do Phonics Rules Belong in Your Classroom Reading Program?
I.	Alphabetic Word Learners and Phonetic Spellers
J.	Decodable Books and Your Classroom Reading Program
K.	Activities for Teaching Letter-Sound Based Phonics
L.	Moving Toward Using the Multiletter Chunks in Word Structure to Read and Spelling
	Long Words
M.	References
CHAPTER 6
STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS: USING CHUNKING STRATEGY TO READ AND LEARN 
LONG WORDS											
A.	Key Ideas
B.	Key Vocabulary
	1.	Roots of the Multiletter Chunk Strategy
	2.	Seven Multiletter Chunks
		a.	Prefixes
		b.	Suffixes
		c.	Base Words
		d.	Greek and Latin Roots
		e. 	Compound Words
		f.	Contractions
		g.	Syllables
	3.	Free and Bound Morphemes
D.	Why Readers Chunk Letters Together
E.	Teaching Multiletter Chunks in Your Classroom Reading Program
F.	How Children Use the Multiletter Chunks in Word Structure
	1.	Correcting Misidentifications
G.	Consolidated Word Learners and Transitional Spellers
	1.	Shania
	2.	Kristen
H.	Prefixes, Suffixes, and Base Words
	1.	Prefixes
	2.	Suffixes
	3.	Base Words
I.	Best Practices for Teaching Prefixes and Suffixes
	1.	Break Words into Meaningful Parts, Talk About the Parts, and Put the 
Words Back Together Again
	2.	Teach Readers How to Peel Away Prefixes and Suffixes to Reveal 
Familiar Base Words
a.	Do I see a prefix?
b.	Do I see a suffix?
c.	Do I know this base word?
d.	Put the word back together
	3.	Teach inflectional suffixes in the first and 
second grade
	4.	Give children practice reading and writing many different words with the 
same prefixes and suffixes
	5.	Teach base word meaning
J.	Greek and Latin Roots
K.	Compound Words
L.	Contractions
M.	Syllables
	1.	Syllable patterns
		a.	CV ¿ open long vowel syllable
		b.	CVC ¿ closed short vowel syllable
		c.	Prefix and suffix syllables
		d.	C + le syllable
		e.	Compound word syllable
	2.	Accent patterns
	3.	Best practices for teaching readers about syllables
		a.	Use clue words to illustrate syllable patterns
		b.	Teach the syllables and accent patterns only after readers have a 
good understanding of phonics letter-sound patterns
		c.	Give readers opportunities to apply their syllable knowledge when 
reading and writing
N.	Activities for Teaching the Multiletter Chunks in Word Structure
O.	Insight into Word Meaning and Pronunciation
P.	References
CHAPTER 7
TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND CHILDREN AT RISK			
A.	Key Ideas
B.	English Language Learners
a.	Phonemic awareness
b.	Phonics
c.	Structural analysis
d.	Word meaning
	1.	Children¿s home language influences learning to read and write English
	2.	Best practices for teaching reading and sharing literacy with English language 
learners
a.	Adapt instruction to children¿s English language proficiency, culture, and 
	experiences
b.	Use culturally familiar text to assess reading ability
c.	Connect children¿s life experiences and home language with your 
classroom reading program
d.	Develop children¿s ability to speak their home language and English
e.	Use predictable books to practice and reinforce English language patterns 
and vocabulary
f.	Read aloud to children
g.	Have children write for a variety of purposes
C.	Children at risk
	1.	Children who over-rely on picture cues
		a.	Shandra
			What Shandra needs to learn
			Teaching phonemic awareness
			Teaching Shandra to pay attention to print
	2.	Children who do not effectively use analogy-based phonics and letter-sound 
		phonics
		b.	Raymond			
			What Raymond needs to learn
			Teaching phonemic awareness
			Teaching phonics
c.	Melissa
			What Melissa needs to learn
			Teaching phonemic awareness
			Teaching phonics
d.	Mike
			What Mike needs to learn
			Teaching blending
			Teaching letter-sound phonics and structural analysis
D. References

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Word recognition.
Reading -- Phonetic method.
Reading (Elementary).