Table of contents for Volcanism on Io : a comparison with Earth / by Ashley Gerard Davies.

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Contents
Preface
Introduction
Section I Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo
1 Io, 1610--1979
1.1 Io before voyager
1.2 Prediction of volcanic activity
1.3 Voyager to jupiter
1.4 Discovery of active volcanism
1.5 Iris and volcanic thermal emission
1.6 Io: the view after Voyager
1.6.1 Surface features
1.6.2 Volcanic vents
1.6.3 Plumes
1.7 Summary
2 Between voyager and Galileo: 1979--1995
2.1 Silicate volcanism on io?
2.2 Ground-based observations
2.2.1 Light-curve photometry
2.2.2 Photometry of occultations
2.2.3 Infrared polarimetry
2.2.4 Speckle interferometric imaging
2.2.5 Multi-wavelength observations
2.3 Observations of io from earth orbit
2.4 The pele plume
2.5 Outburst eruptions
2.5.1 Outburst definition
2.5.2 Lava fountains and outburst eruptions
2.6 Stealth plumes
2.7 Io on the eve of Galileo
3 Galileo at Io
3.1 Instrumentation
3.1.1 Solid State Imaging Experiment
3.1.2 Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer
3.1.3 Photo-polarimeter radiometer
3.1.4 Ultra-Violet Spectrometer
3.2 Galileo observations of io
3.2.1 Orbit insertion
3.2.2 Prime Mission
3.2.3 Galileo Europa Mission
3.2.4 Galileo Millennium Mission
SectionII Planetary volcanism: Evolution and composition
4 Io and earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure
4.1 Global heat flow
4.2 Planetary formation
4.2.1 Formation and differentiation of Earth
4.2.2 Formation and differentiation of Io
4.3 Post-formation heating
4.3.1 Radiogenic heating
4.3.2 Tidal heating
4.3.3 Orbital evolution and the dissipation of heat
4.4 Interior structure
4.4.1 Interior structure of the Earth
4.4.2 Interior structure of Io
4.5 Volcanism over time
4.5.1 Earth
4.5.2 Io
4.6 Implications
5 Magmas and volatiles
5.1 Basalt
5.2 Ultramafic magma
5.3 Lava rheology
5.3.1 Viscosity
5.3.2 Yield strength
5.3.3 Other properties
5.4 Sulphur
5.4.1 Viscosity
5.4.2 Other thermodynamic properties
5.4.3 Colour and temperature
5.4.4 Sulphur volcanism
5.5 Sulphur dioxide (SO2)
5.5.1 Solubility of SO2 in magma
5.5.2 Solubility of SO2 in sulphur
SectionIII Observing and modelling volcanic activity
6 Observations: Thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity
6.1 Remote sensing of volcanic activity on earth
6.2 Remote sensing of volcanic activity on Io
6.3 Remote sensing of thermal emission
6.4 Blackbody thermal emission
6.5 Multi-spectral observations
6.6 The 'Dual-band' technique
6.7 Surface temperature distributions and effect on thermal
emission
6.8 Hyperspectral observations
6.9 Analysis of hyperspectral thermal emission data
6.10 Analysis of ssi thermal emission data
7 Models of Effusivve Eruption Processes
7.1 Cooling of lava on earth and io
7.1.1 Heat loss by radiation (Frad)
7.1.2 Heat loss by conduction (Fcond)
7.1.3 Heat loss by convection (Fnat or Fforce)
7.1.4 Effect of planetary environment and atmosphere
7.2 Modelling lava solidification and cooling
7.2.1 The importance of latent heat
7.2.2 Cooling before lava solidification
7.2.3 Cooling after solidification
7.2.4 Use of the age-temperature relationship
7.2.5 Integrated thermal emission models
7.3 Volumetric rates (QF and QE)
7.3.1 Determination from thermal emission
7.3.2 Lava flows and calculation of QF
7.3.3 Lava lakes and QF
7.3.4 Discharge rate variability
7.3.5 Factors influencing waxing flow
7.3.6 Factors influencing waning flow
7.3.7 Areal coverage rate
7.4 Models of lava emplacement
7.5 Supply to the surface: conduit geometry
7.6 Crustal structure controls on ascent of magma on Io
7.6.1 Ascent of magma
7.6.2 Lithospheric magma reservoirs
7.6.3 The effect of volatiles on crustal structure
8 Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions
8.1 Effusive activity: Landforms and thermal emission
evolution
8.1.1 Pahoehoe lava flow fields
8.1.2 Channelled flows and inflated pahoehoe sheet flows
8.1.3 Lava lakes
8.1.4 Lava (fire) fountains
8.1.5 Domes
8.2 Flux density as a function of eruption style
8.3 Summary
SectionIV Galileo at IO: The volcanic bestiary
9 The view from Galileo
9.1 Surface changes: Voyager to Galileo
9.2 Colour and composition
9.2.1 Dark units
9.2.2 Red/orange polar units
9.2.3 Yellow units
9.2.4 Red units
9.2.5 White and gray units
9.2.6 Green deposits
9.2.7 Other compounds
9.2.8 Changes during Galileo
9.2.9 Coloured lava flows on Earth and Io
9.3 Discovery of widespread silicate volcanism
9.4 The rise (and fall?) of ultra-high-temperature volcanism
9.4.1 Re-evaluation: viscous heating
9.4.2 Re-evaluation: derivation of temperature
9.4.3 A new model for Pillan and Tvashtar
9.4.4 Re-evaluation: Pele
9.4.5 Re-evaluation: Conclusions
9.5 ppr observations
9.6 CAssini and Galileo observe Io
9.7 Adaptive optics and hubble observations
9.8 Other discoveries
9.9 Summary
10 The lava lake at pele
10.1 Setting
10.2 Observations of thermal emission
10.3 A lava lake at pele
10.4 Importance of temporal and spectral coverage
10.5 Lava lakes
10.6 Implications for magma supply and interior structure
10.7 Plume composition and implications for volatile supply
10.8 Calculation of mass flux and flux densities
10.9 Further comparison with lava lakes on earth
10.10 Summary
11 Pillan and Tvashtar: Lava fountains and flows
11.1 Lava fountains: outbursts explained?
11.2 Pillan 1997: flood lavas and the emplacement of long flows
11.2.1 Galileo observes Pillan
11.2.2 Flow thickness
11.2.3 Total volume erupted, and eruption and effusion
rates
11.2.4 Emplacement regime
11.3 Tvashtar Catena
11.4 Lava fountains on Io
11.5 Terrestrial analogues: Flood basalts and fissure eruptions
11.5.1 Laki (skaft´ar fires), 1783--1784
11.5.2 Flood basalts: the Columbia River Flood Basalt
Province
11.6 Pillan comparisons with terrestrial eruptions
11.7 Summary: activity at pillan in 1997 and at tvashtar in 2000
12 Prometheus and amirani: EFfusive activity and insulated flows
12.1 Volcanic activity at prometheus
12.1.1 Galileo observes Prometheus
12.1.2 Thin flows at Prometheus
12.1.3 Style of activity at Prometheus
12.1.4 Magma supply at Prometheus
12.1.5 Prometheus bound?
12.2 Comparison with pu'u 'O'O-Kupaianaha, Hawai'I
12.2.1 Magma and eruption style
12.2.2 Plumes
12.2.3 Episodic activity and magma supply
12.2.4 Areal coverage rates
12.3 Amirani flow field
12.4 Discussions and summary
13 Loki Patera: Io's Powerhouse
13.1 Voyager to Galileo
13.2 Style of activity
13.3 Temporal behaviour
13.4 Resurfacing of loki patera
13.4.1 Resurfacing with lava flows
13.4.2 Resurfacing by lava lake overturn
13.4.3 The trickster
13.4.4 Nims takes a close look
13.5 Modelling the resurfacing PROCESS
13.6 Magma volume at loki paterA
13.7 Summary: A class of its own
14 Other volcanoes and eruptions
14.1 Tupan Patera
14.2 Culann patera and environs
14.3 Zamama
14.4 Gish bar
14.5 Emakong Patera: sulphur volcanism?
14.6 Balder AND Ababinili Paterae: SO2
Flows?
14.7 The plumes of surt and Thor
SectionV Volcanism on Io: The global view
15 Geomorphology: Paterae, shields, flows and mountains
15.1 Paterae on io and calderas on earth
15.1.1 Patera sizes
15.1.2 Lava composition and patera formation
15.2 Shield volcanoes
15.2.1 Low shield volcanoes
15.2.2 Steep-sided shield volcanoes
15.2.3 Unusual shield volcanoes
15.2.4 Volcanic shield evolution
15.3 Lava flow morphology
15.4 Lava channels
15.5 Mountains and formation mechanisms
15.6 Conclusions
16 Volcanic plumes
16.1 Explosive activity on io and earth
16.2 Io observations
16.3 Plume types
16.3.1 Pele-type plumes
16.3.2 Prometheus-type plumes
16.3.3 Variants
16.4 Plume models
16.5 Summary
17 HOT SPOTS
17.1 Variability and style of activity
17.1.1 Thermal signature
17.1.2 Classification and comparison using 2:5-ìm
intensity ratio
17.2 Thermal emission comparisons
17.3 Effusion rates
17.4 Distribution of hot spots
17.5 Heat transport by eruption class
17.5.1 Volcanic heat transport on earth
17.5.2 Implications for Io
SectionVI Io after Galileo
18 Volcanism on Io: A post-Galileo view
18.1 Crustal structure
18.2 Magma composition
18.3 Crust volatile content
18.4 Hot-Spot variability
18.5 Eruption styles
18.6 Plumes
18.7 Volcanism on io and earth
18.8 Questions
18.8.1 The global view
18.8.2 Composition and rheology
18.8.3 Regional volcanism
18.8.4 Local volcanism
19 The future of Io observations
19.1 Spacecraft observations
19.1.1 JUNO
19.1.2 EUropa mission
19.1.3 Dedicated Io mission
19.2 Imaging Io
19.3 Articical intelligence, autonomy, and spacecraft operations
19.4 Telescope observations
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Plate captions
Reproduction permissions
Bibliograpy

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Io (Satellite) -- Volcanism.
Io (Satellite) -- Volcanoes.
Planetary volcanism -- Remote sensing.
Volcanism.