Table of contents for Chomsky's universal grammar : an introduction / V.J. Cook and Mark Newson.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Preface to the Third Edition vii 
1 The Nature of Universal Grammar 1 
1.1 The early development of Universal Grammar Theory 2 
1.2 Relating ¿sounds¿ and ¿meanings¿ 4 
1.3 The computational system 8 
1.4 Questions for linguistics 11 
1.5 General ideas of language 13 
1.6 Linguistic universals 20 
1.7 The evidence for Universal Grammar Theory 24 
1.8 Conclusion 26 
2 Principles, Parameters and Language Acquisition 28 
2.1 Principles and parameters 28 
2.2 Language acquisition 45 
3 Structure in the Government/Binding model 61 
3.1 The heart of the Government/Binding Model 62 
3.2 Modules, principles and parameters 62 
3.3 X-bar Theory in Government and Binding 73 
3.4 Theta Theory 80 
3.5 Control Theory and null subjects 86 
3.6 Further developments in X-bar Theory 100 
3.7 Summary 118 
4 Movement in Government/Binding Theory 121 
4.1 An overview of movement 121 
4.2 Further developments to the theory of movement 133 
4.3 Bounding, Barriers and Relativized Minimality 139 
4.4 Case Theory 146 
4.5 Binding Theory 162 
4.6 Beyond S-structure and the Empty Category Principle 175
5 Chomskyan Approaches to Language Acquisition 185 
5.1 The physical basis for Universal Grammar 185 
5.2 A language learning model 189 
5.3 The innateness hypothesis 204 
5.4 The role of Universal Grammar in learning 205 
5.5 Complete from the beginning or developing with time? 207 
5.6 Issues in parameter setting 209 
5.7 Markedness and language development 215 
6 Second Language Acquisition and Universal Grammar 221 
6.1 The purity of the monolingual argument 221 
6.2 Universal bilingualism 222 
6.3 The multi-competence view 223 
6.4 The poverty-of-the-stimulus argument and second language 
acquisition 224 
6.5 Models and metaphors 228 
6.6 Hypotheses of the initial second language state 231 
6.7 The final state of second language acquisition 238 
7 Structure in the Minimalist Program 242 
7.1 From Government/Binding to the Minimalist Program 243 
7.2 Basic minimalist concepts 249 
7.3 Phrase structure in the Minimalist Program 255 
7.4 Thematic roles and structural positions 262 
7.5 Adjunction 265 
7.6 Linear order 268 
8 Movement in the Minimalist Program 271 
8.1 Functional heads and projections 271 
8.2 The motivation for movement 275 
8.3 The nature of movement 279 
8.4 Overt and covert movement 281 
8.5 Properties of movement 287 
8.6 Phases 301 
8.7 Conclusion 308 
References 310 
Index 319 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Grammar, Comparative and general.
Language acquisition.
Chomsky, Noam.