Table of contents for Handbook of research on user interface design and evaluation for mobile technology / Joanna Lumsden, editor.

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Table of Contents
(ordered by chapter)
Handbook of Research on User Interface Design and Evaluation for Mobile Technology
Editor: Joanna Lumsden
Publisher: IGI Global
Ch.
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Chapter Title
Authors, Affiliations
Foreword
Matt Jones, Future Interaction Technology Lab, Swansea University, UK
Section I: User Interface Design for Mobile Technologies
This section looks at many of the critical aspects concerned with effective design of mobile applications. The section begins with a series of chapters which discuss the adoption of ethnographic methods to inform the design of such technologies, including a selection of chapters which report on observed mobile device use and subsequent implications for design. This section covers issues such as how factors of user acceptance of mobile services can be used to guide the design of such technologies, as well as the impact of age and cognitive capacity on design. Chapters consider wearable technologies, the importance of contextual information in mobile application design, the design of in-car user interfaces, and issues surrounding the design and implementation of mobile learning applications. The section takes a look at adaptive and intelligent user interfaces for mobile computing, as well as tools for rapid prototyping, modeling, and simulation of mobile systems. The section concludes with a look to the future in terms of ecologies of interacting artifacts, reflecting an evolution from strictly mobile to more ubiquitous technologies.
1
From Ethnography to Interface Design
Jeni Paay, Aalborg University, Denmark
2
Use of Experimental Ethno-Methods to Evaluate the User Experience with Mobile Interactive Multimedia Systems
Anxo Cereijo Roib s, University of Brighton, UK
Stephen Johnson, BT Mobility Research Centre, UK
3
Problems Rendezvousing - A Diary Study
Martin Colbert, Kingston University, UK
4
User Experience of Camera Phones in Social Contexts
Hanna Stelmaszewska, Middlesex University, UK
Bob Fields, Middlesex University, UK
Ann Blandford, University College London, UK
5
Interaction Design for Personal Photo Management on a Mobile Device
Hyowon Lee, Dublin City University, Ireland
Cathal Gurrin, Dublin City University, Ireland
Gareth J.F. Jones, Dublin City University, Ireland
Alan F. Smeaton, Dublin City University, Ireland 
6
Understanding One Handed Use of Mobile Devices
Amy K. Karlson, University of Maryland, USA
Benjamin B. Bederson, University of Maryland, USA
Jose L. Contreras-Vidal, University of Maryland, USA
7
User Acceptance of Mobile Services
Eija Kaasinen, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland
8
Transgenerational Designs in Mobile Technology 
Martina Ziefle, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Susanne Bay, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
9
Learning-Disabled Children - A Disregarded User Group
Susanne Bay, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Martina Ziefle, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
10
Human Factors Problems of Wearable Computers
Chris Baber, The University of Birmingham, UK
James Knight, The University of Birmingham, UK
11
The Garment As Interface
Sabine Seymour, Moondial Inc., Austria
12
Context as a Necessity in Mobile Applications
Eleni Christopoulou, University of Patras & Ionian University, Greece
13
Context-Awareness and Mobile Devices
Anind K. Dey, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Jonna Häkkilä, Nokia Research Center, Finland 
14
Designing and Evaluating In-Car User-Interfaces
Gary Burnett, University of Nottingham, UK
15
Speech-Based UI Design for the Automobile
Bent Schmidt-Nielsen, MERL, USA
Bret Harsham, MERL, USA
Bhiksha Raj, MERL, USA
Clifton Forlines, MERL, USA
16
Design For Mobile Learning in Museums
Nikolaos Tselios, University of Patras, Greece
Ioanna Papadimitriou, University of Patras, Greece
Dimitrios Raptis, University of Patras, Greece
Nikoletta Yiannoutsou, University of Patras, Greece
Vassilis Komis, University of Patras, Greece
Nikolaos Avouris, University of Patras, Greece 
17
Collaborative Learning in a Mobile Technology Supported Classroom
Siu Cheung Kong, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
18
Design of an Adaptive Mobile Learning Management System
Hyungsung Park, Korea National University of Education, Korea
Young Kyun Baek, Korea National University of Education, Korea
David Gibson, The University of Vermont, USA
19
Adaptive Interfaces in Mobile Environments - An Approach Based on Mobile Agents
Nikola Mitrovic, University of Zaragoza, Spain
Eduardo Mena, University of Zaragoza, Spain
Jose Alberto Royo, University of Zaragoza, Spain
20
Intelligent User Interfaces for Mobile Computing
Michael J. O¿Grady, University College Dublin, Ireland
Gregory M.P. O¿Hare, University College Dublin, Ireland
21
Tools for Rapidly Prototyping Mobile Interactions
Yang Li, University of Washington, USA
Scott Klemmer, Stanford University, USA
James A. Landay, University of Washington & Intel Research Seattle, USA
22
Modelling and Simulation of Mobile Mixed Systems
Emmanuel Dubois, University of Toulouse III, France
Wafaa Abou Moussa, University of Toulouse III, France
Cédric Bach, University of Toulouse III, France
Nelly de Bonnefoy, University of Toulouse III, France
23
Engineering Emergent Ecologies of Interacting Artefacts
Ioannis D. Zaharakis, Computer Technology Institute, Greece
Achilles D. Kameas, Computer Technology Institute, Greece & Hellenic Open University, Greece
Section II: Novel Interaction Techniques for Mobile Technologies
This section focuses on the innovative possibilities for interaction with mobile technologies. Starting with a potential classification scheme for mobile interaction techniques, this section looks at a number of novel interaction techniques such as text entry, speech-based input, and audio and haptic interaction for mobile devices. Chapters are included which introduce the concept of unobtrusive interaction and the use of EMG signals to achieve subtle interaction. This section concludes with a look at visual means of interaction, from camera-based input, through 3D visualisation and the presentation of large data sets using starfield displays, to projected displays for collaborative interaction.
24
The Design Space of Ubiquitous Mobile Input
Rafael Ballagas, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Michael Rohs, Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Germany
Jennifer G. Sheridan, BigDog Interactive Ltd., UK
Jan Borchers, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
25
Text Entry
Mark David Dunlop, University of Strathclyde, UK
Michelle Montgomery Masters, University of Strathclyde, UK
26
Improving Stroke Based Input of Chinese Characters
Min Lin, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), USA
Andrew Sears, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), USA
Steven Herbst, Motorola, USA
Yanfang Liu, Motorola China Electronics Ltd., PR China
27
Voice-Enabled User Interfaces for Mobile Devices
Louise E. Moser, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
P. Michael Melliar-Smith, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
28
Speech-Centric Multimodal User Interface Design in Mobile Technology
Dong Yu, Microsoft Research, USA
Li Deng, Microsoft Research, USA
29
Model-based Target Sonification in Small Screen Devices - Perception and Action
Parisa Eslambolchilar, University of Wales, UK
Andrew Crossan, University of Glasgow, UK
Roderick Murray-Smith, University of Glasgow, UK
Sara Dalzel-Job, University of Glasgow, UK
Frank Pollick, University of Glasgow, UK
30
Unobtrusive Movement Interaction for Mobile Devices
Panu Korpipää, Finwe Ltd., Finland
Jukka Linjama, Nokia, Finland
Juha Kela, Finwe Ltd., Finland
Tapani Rantakokko, Finwe Ltd., Finland
31
EMG For Subtle, Intimate Interfaces
Enrico Costanza, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Samuel A. Inverso, The Australian National University, Australia
Rebecca Allen, UCLA Design | Media Arts, USA
Pattie Maes, MIT Media Lab, USA
32
Mobile Camera Based User Interaction
Tolga Capin, Bilkent University, Turkey
Antonio Haro, D4D Technologies, USA
33
3D Visualization on Mobile Devices
Andrea Sanna, Politecnico di Torino, Italy
Fabrizio Lamberti, Politecnico di Torino, Italy
34
Navigation Support for Exploring Starfield Displays on Personal Digital Assistants
Thorsten Büring, University of Konstanz, Germany
35
Projected Displays of Mobile Devices for Collaboration
Masanori Sugimoto, University of Tokyo, Japan
Section III: Assistive Mobile Technologies
The potential for well designed mobile technologies to fulfill an assistive role - that is, as assistive technologies - is increasingly being realised. This section presents a selection of chapters which discuss the design implications specific to assistive mobile technologies. The section starts with a discussion of the key issues and trends of designing and evaluating mobile assistive technologies before looking at design to support specific demographics, including seniors, mental health interventions, and visually impaired users. The chapter concludes with a look at designing the user interface to the ultimate assistive mobile device, the smart wheelchair.
36
Designing Mobile Technologies for Individuals with Disabilities
Rock Leung, University of British Columbia, Canada
Joanna Lumsden, National Research Council of Canada, Canada
37
Mobile Design for Older Adults
Katie A. Siek, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
38
Designing Mobile Applications to Support Mental Health Interventions
Mark Matthews, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Gavin Doherty, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
David Coyle, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
John Sharry, Department of Child and Family Psychiatry, Mater Hospital, Ireland
39
Widely Usable User Interfaces on Mobile Devices with RFID
Francesco Bellotti, University of Genoa, Italy
Riccardo Berta, University of Genoa, Italy
Alessandro De Gloria, University of Genoa, Italy
Massimiliano Margarone, University of Genoa, Italy
40
Toward a Novel Human Interface for Conceptualizing Spatial Information in Non-Speech Audio
Shigueo Nomura, Kyoto University, Japan
Takayuki Shiose, Kyoto University, Japan
Hiroshi Kawakami, Kyoto University, Japan
Osamu Katai, Kyoto University, Japan
Keiji Yamanaka, Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil
41
A Navigational Aid for Blind Pedestrians Designed with User- and Activity-Centered Approaches
Florence Gaunet, Laboratoire Eco-Anthropologie et Ethnobiologie UMR 5145, France
Xavier Briffault, Université René-Descartes Paris V , France 
42
Trends in Adaptive Interface Design for Smart Wheelchairs
Julio Abascal, University of the Basque Country-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Spain
Borja Bonail, University of the Basque Country-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Spain
Daniel Cagigas, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain
Nestor Garay, University of the Basque Country-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Spain
Luis Gardeazabal, University of the Basque Country-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Spain
Section IV: Evaluation Techniques for Mobile Technologies
The rapid evolution of mobile technologies has posed a number of challenges in terms of effective evaluation strategies, which has opened this area up to interesting, ongoing debate - especially with regards the value of lab versus field evaluations. Starting with a theoretical look at the concepts and issues involved in evaluating mobile human-computer interaction, this section covers the spectrum of evaluation as it applies to mobile technologies. Chapters are included which look at adaptation of traditional methods to meet the needs of mobile evaluations, and chapters which outline means to systematically select, combine, and tailor methods to the specific needs of any given evaluation. The use of appropriated heuristic evaluation, wizard-of-oz studies, cognitive modeling as a testing tool, and Fitt's Law as a performance measure are all covered in this section. The use of multilayered evaluation approaches, the application of the Privacy Regulation Model as an evaluation tool, and a framework and model for identifying, organising, and classifying usability factors of mobile phones are also discussed. This section reflects the aforementioned debate regarding lab versus field evaluation of mobile technologies by including chapters representing both sides of the argument, including those which present innovative mechanisms and set-ups for use in each context.
43
Evaluating Mobile Human-Computer Interaction
Chris Baber, The University of Birmingham, UK
44
Usability Evaluation Methods for Mobile Applications
Regina Bernhaupt, University of Salzburg, Austria
Kristijan Mihalic, University of Salzburg, Austria
Marianna Obrist, University of Salzburg, Austria
45
Evaluating Context-Aware Mobile Interfaces for Professionals
Jan Willem Streefkerk, TNO Defense, Security and Safety & Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Myra P. van Esch-Bussemakers, TNO Defense, Security and Safety, The Netherlands
Mark A. Neerincx, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Rosemarijn Looije, TNO Defense, Security and Safety, The Netherlands
46
Appropriating Heuristic Evaluation Methods for Mobile Computing
Enrico Bertini, DIUF - University of Fribourg, Switzerland
Tiziana Catarci, University of Rome ¿La Sapienza¿, Italy
Alan Dix, Lancaster University, UK
Silvia Gabrielli, University of Udine, Italy
Stephen Kimani, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya
Giuseppe Santucci, University of Rome ¿La Sapienza¿, Italy
47
Using Wizard of Oz to Evaluate Mobile Applications
Janet C Read, University of Central Lancashire, UK
48
Cognitive Models as Usability Testing Tools
Vanja Kljajevic, NewHeights Software, Canada & Carleton University, Canada
49
Assessing Human Mobile Computing Performance by Fitt's Law
Thomas Alexander, FGAN-Research Institute for Communication, Germany
Christopher Schlick, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Alexander Sievert, German Sport University Cologne, Germany
Dieter Leyk, German Sport University Cologne & Central Institute of the Federal Armed Forces Medical Services Koblenz, Germany 
50
Multilayered Approach to Evaluate Mobile User Interfaces
Maria de F tima Queiroz Vieira Turnell, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Brazil
José Eust quio Rangel de Queiroz, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Brazil
Danilo de Sousa Ferreira, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Brazil
51
Theory and Application of the Privacy Regulation Model
Jaakko T. Lehikoinen, Nokia Research Center, Finland
52
Framework and Model of Usability Factors of Mobile Phones
Dong-Han Ham, Middlesex University, UK
Jeongyun Heo, MC R&D Center LG Electronics, Korea
Peter Fossick, Middlesex University, UK
William Wong, Middlesex University, UK
Sanghyun Park, MC R&D Center LG Electronics, Korea
Chiwon Song, MC R&D Center LG Electronics, Korea
Mike Bradley, Middlesex University, UK 
53
Will Laboratory Test Results Be Valid in Mobile Contexts?
Anne Kaikkonen, Nokia Multimedia, Finland
Aki Kekäläinen, TeliaSonera, Finland
Mikael Cankar, TeliaSonera, Finland
Titti Kallio, TeliaSonera, Finland
Anu Kankainen, Idean Research, Finland
54
Mobile Evaluations in a Lab Environment
Murray Crease, National Research Council of Canada, Canada
Robert Longworth, University of New Brunswick, Canada 
55
Instrumented Usability Analysis for Mobile Devices
Andrew Crossan, University of Glasgow, UK
Roderick Murray-Smith, University of Glasgow, UK & Hamilton Institute, Ireland
Stephen Brewster, University of Glasgow, UK
Bojan Musizza, Institut Jozef Stefan, Slovenia
56
Three Eye Movement Studies of Mobile Readability
Gustav Öquist, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
57
Did You See That?
Murray Crease, National Research Council of Canada, Canada
Joanna Lumsden, National Research Council of Canada, Canada 
58
A Field Laboratory for Evaluating In Situ
Rune T. Høegh, Aalborg University, Denmark
Jesper Kjeldskov, Aalborg University, Denmark
Mikael B. Skov, Aalborg University, Denmark
Jan Stage, Aalborg University, Denmark
59
Field Evaluation of Collaborative Mobile Applications
Adrian Stoica, University of Patras, Greece
Georgios Fiotakis, University of Patras, Greece
Dimitrios Raptis, University of Patras, Greece
Ioanna Papadimitriou, University of Patras, Greece
Vassilis Komis, University of Patras, Greece
Nikolaos Avouris, University of Patras, Greece
Section V: Case Studies
This final section includes a selection of detailed case studies. These illustrate many of the concepts discussed in previous sections and cover the design of mobile technology for a closed environment (in this case, a hospital), the design of a memory-aid, an application for reviewing meeting records, and a tool for mobile collaborative reading, as well as the evaluation of learner satisfaction in a multi-platform learning system.
60
UI Design for Mobile Technology in a Closed Environment
Kate Oakley, Carleton University, Canada
Gitte Lindgaard, Carleton University, Canada
Peter Kroeger, BRYTECH, Canada
John Miller, BRYTECH, Canada
Earl Bryenton, BRYTECH, Canada
Paul Hébert, Canadian Medical Association, Canada
61
Designing a Ubiquitous Audio-Based Memory Aid 
Shwetak N. Patel, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Khai N. Truong, University of Toronto, Canada
Gillian R. Hayes, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Giovanni Iachello, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Julie A. Kientz, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Gregory D. Abowd, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA 
62
Visualisation of Meeting Records on Mobile Devices
Saturnino Luz, Trinity College, Ireland
Masood Masoodian, The University of Waikato, New Zealand 
63
A Proposed Tool for Mobile Collaborative Reading
Jason T. Black, Florida A&M University, USA
Lois Wright Hawkes, Florida State University, USA 
64
Evaluating Learner Satisfaction in a Multiplatform e-Learning System
Tiong T. Goh, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Kinshuk, Athabasca University, Canada
Nian-Shing Chen, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Mobile computing -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Human-computer interaction -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
User interfaces (Computer systems) -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.