Table of contents for Textbook on international law / Martin Dixon.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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OUTLINE CONTENTS
1The nature of international law and the international system1
2The sources of international law23
3The law of treaties53
4International law and national law87
5Personality, statehood and recognition111
6Jurisdiction and sovereignty142
7Immunities from national jurisdiction174
8Law of the sea207
9State responsibility242
10The peaceful settlement of disputes275
11The use of force309
12Human rights341
DETAILED CONTENTS
Preface v
List of Abbreviations xiii
Table of Cases 000
Table of Secondary Legislation 000
Table of Statutes 000
1 The nature of international law and the international system 1
1.1 The role of international law 3
1.2 The existence of international rules as a system of law 4
1.3 The enforcement of international law 6
1.4 The effectiveness of international law 10
1.5 The weakness of international law 13
1.6 The juridical basis of international law 15
1.7 The future of international law 19
 Further reading 20
 Summary 22
2 The sources of international law 23
2.1 Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice 23
2.2 International treaties ('conventions') 26
2.3 Custom 30
2.4 General principles of law 40
2.5 Judicial decisions 43
2.6 Writings of publicists 46
2.7 Resolutions of international organisations 47
2.8 Soft law 50
 Further reading 50
 Summary 52
3 The law of treaties 53
3.1 What is a treaty? 54
3.2 Acts lacking an intention to create legal relations 55
3.3 Other 'non-treaty' circumstances giving rise to legally binding obligations 56
3.4 The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties 1969 59
3.5 Vienna Convention on the Succession of States in Respect of Treaties 1978 82
3.6 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties between International Organisations or between States and International Organisations 1986 83
 Further reading 84
 Summary 85
4 International law and national law 87
4.1 Theories 88
4.2 National law before international courts and tribunals 91
4.3 Theories about international law in the national legal system: incorporation, transformation and implementation 94
4.4 International law in the national law of the United Kingdom 97
4.5 National courts applying international law 107
4.6 Executive certi5cates and ministerial discretion 108
 Further reading 109
 Summary 110
5 Personality, statehood and recognition 111
 Part One: Personality and Statehood in International Law 111
5.1 The concept of personality in international law 111
5.2 The subjects of international law 113
 Part Two: Recognition 126
5.3 Recognition in international law 127
5.4 Recognition of states and governments in national law 131
 Further reading 140
 Summary 141
6 Jurisdiction and sovereignty 142
6.1 General principles of jurisdiction 142
6.2 Civil and criminal jurisdiction 144
6.3 The acquisition of sovereignty over territory 154
6.4 Rights over foreign territory 167
6.5 Areas outside the exclusive jurisdiction of any state 168
6.6 Jurisdiction over airspace and aircraft 171
 Further reading 172
 Summary 173
7 Immunities from national jurisdiction 174
 Part One: State Immunity 174
7.1 General conception of immunity and rationale in international law 175
7.2 State immunity in international law 178
7.3 The UN Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and their Property 2004 (the ILC Draft Articles) 185
7.4 State immunity in the United Kingdom 187
7.5 Heads of state 197
7.6 The European Convention on State Immunity 1972 197
7.7 State immunity in the UK and human rights 198
 Part Two: Diplomatic and Consular Immunities 199
7.8 International law 199
7.9 The United Kingdom 204
7.10 A note on the immunities of international organisations 204
 Further reading 205
 Summary 206
8 The law of the sea 207
8.1 Sources of the law of the sea 207
8.2 The territorial sea and contiguous zone 210
8.3 The Exclusive Economic Zone 214
8.4 The continental shelf 217
8.5 The deep sea bed 227
8.6 The high seas 231
8.7 Miscellaneous matters 232
8.8 Conclusion 236
 Further reading 237
 Summary 238
 Appendix: Guide to the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea and 1994 Agreement on the Deep Sea-Bed 239
9 State responsibility 242
9.1 General issues of state responsibility 244
9.2 The treatment of foreign nationals 255
9.3 Expropriation of foreign-owned property 263
9.4 The internationalisation of contracts 270
9.5 Protection for private investors 271
9.6 Other forms of responsibility in international law 273
 Further reading 273
 Summary 274
10 The peaceful settlement of disputes 275
10.1 Negotiation 276
10.2 Mediation and good of5ces 277
10.3 Inquiry 277
10.4 Settlement by the United Nations 277
10.5 Conciliation 280
10.6 Settlement by regional machinery 280
10.7 Arbitration 280
10.8 The International Court of Justice 283
10.9 Advisory Opinions 304
 Further reading 307
 Summary 308
11 The use of force 309
 Part One: The Unilateral Use of Force 310
11.1 The law before 1945 310
11.2 The law after the UN Charter 312
 Part Two: The Collective Use of Force 328
11.3 The United Nations 329
11.4 Regional organisations 335
11.5 Peacekeeping 337
Further reading 339
 Summary 340
12 Human rights 341
12.1 The role and nature of human rights law 341
12.2 The development of the law of human rights 344
12.3 The protection of human rights under the United Nations 346
12.4 The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1950 353
12.5 Other regional machinery 356
12.6 Success and failure 357
 Further reading 358
 Summary 359
Glossary 361
Index 000

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

International law.