Table of contents for Psychiatry / David A. Tomb.

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Contents
Preface
1.	PSYCHIATRIC CLASSIFICATION
A description of psychiatric classification and DSM-IV is presented. 
2.	ASSESSMENT
DSM-IV has clarified the procedure of diagnosis, yet there is still need for a good history and 
mental status examination. Additional useful information may be obtained from psychological 
testing, EEG, brain imaging, and the Amytal interview.
3.	PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS
Schizophrenia, the major psychotic disorder, is a chronic disorder. There are several other 
psychoses which mimic schizophrenia but which appear to have different etiologies.
4.	MOOD DISORDERS
Mood disorders include both depression and mania. They can be major or minor and primary or 
due to medical causes. Treatment is often quite specific and successful.
5.	DELIRIUM AND AMNESTIC AND OTHER COGNITIVE DISORDERS ...
The unique syndromes produced by compromised brain function must be considered 
prominently in the differential diagnosis of almost all other psychiatric disorders.
6.	DEMENTIA
Dementia is defined and clues for making the diagnosis are given. Treatable and untreatable types 
are listed along with general treatment principles.
7.	SUICIDAL AND ASSAULTIVE BEHAVIORS
Suicidal patients are common and diagnostically diverse. They need to be identified and 
vigorously treated. Violent patients require special handling and a careful workup.
8.	ANXIETY DISORDERS
Anxiety disorders include not just patients with anxiety but also patients with phobias, 
unfortunate reactions to severe stress, and obsessive compulsive disorders.
9.	DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS
These dramatic conditions include amnesias, fugues, dissociative identity disorder, and 
depersonalized states. All are uncommon but striking when encountered.
10.	GRIEF AND THE DYING PATIENT
A description of normal grief and unresolved grief, with treatment principles. Clinical 
presentation and treatment of the response to chronic illness and dying are described.
11.	CONDITIONS WHICH MIMIC PHYSICAL DISEASE
Some medical patients may really have a psychiatric illness. Possibilities include conversion 
disorder, somatization disorder, hypochondriasis, and pain disorder.
12.	PSYCHOSOMATIC DISORDERS
The general characteristics of psychophysiologic illness are described and the psychological and 
physiological mechanisms are detailed. Specific psychosomatic disorders are listed.
13.	PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS OF NONPSYCHIATRIC MEDICATION
The medications most likely to cause psychiatric symptoms are presented along with the clinical 
pictures they produce.
14.	PSYCHIATRIC PRESENTATIONS OF MEDICAL DISEASE
Anxiety, depression, and confusion may all have a purely medical cause. The physical disorders 
which most commonly present with psychiatric symptoms are described.
15.	PSYCHIATRIC PRESENTATIONS OF NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE
Neurological disease produces psychiatric symptoms partially based on the location of the CNS 
pathology. Specific diseases are described.
16.	PSYCHIATRY OF ALCOHOL
Alcohol-related conditions are common and include intoxication, abuse, withdrawal, DTs, and 
hallucinosis. Treatments are described.
17.	PSYCHIATRY OF DRUG ABUSE
Drugs covered include opioids, sedative-hypnotics, hallucinogens, stimulants, and inhalants.
18.	PSYCHOSEXUAL DISORDERS
Disorders of normal sexual performances are covered, as are sexual deviations, and disorders of 
gender identity. Available treatments are presented.
19.	SLEEP DISTURBANCES
An understanding of normal sleep and a careful history are key to a good evaluation of the two 
common sleep disturbances, insomnia and hypersomnia.
20.	PERSONALITY DISORDERS
Several different personality disorders are recognized. Although all of them produce dysfunction, 
in each case the personality characteristics seem "natural" to the patient.
21.	MENTAL RETARDATION
Mental retardation is common and due to a variety of causes. It is not necessarily an irreversible 
condition.
22.	THE PSYCHOTHERAPIES
There are numerous different psychotherapies in use but the major ones include psychoanalysis, 
supportive psychotherapy, group therapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, and family therapy.
23.	BIOLOGICAL THERAPY
The major drugs in adult psychiatry are the antidepressants, the major and minor tranquilizers, 
and lithium. ECT plays a major role, and psychosurgery a minor role in modern treatment.
24.	THE ELDERLY PATIENT
The elderly patient has some unique sensitivities. Knowledge of special psychopharmacologic 
and psychotherapeutic principles is needed to treat these patients satisfactorily.
25.	LEGAL ISSUES
Legal matters are assuming ever greater importance in psychiatry. Particularly complex are 
involuntary commitment and treatment issues as well as the interface between psychiatry and the 
criminal courts.
26.	IMPULSE-CONTROL DISORDERS
This grouping constitutes an odd collection of conditions which have just enough in common to 
be placed together. However, specific disorders from this group could just as easily be placed 
elsewhere in DSM-IV-TR. Moreover, a number of other disorders are discussed which could as 
easily (and perhaps will) be placed here as well.
INDEX

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Psychiatry -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Mental illness -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Psychological manifestations of general diseases -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Mental Disorders -- Handbooks.