Table of contents for Structural steel design : statics / Jack C. McCormac, Wallace Fowler, Craig Little.

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Contents 
Preface iii 
CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Structural Steel Design 1 
1.1 Advantages of Steel as a Structural Material 1 
1.2 Disadvantages of Steel as a Structural Material 3 
1.3 Early Uses of Iron and Steel 4 
1.4 Steel Sections 7 
1.5 Metric Units 12 
1.6 Cold-Formed Light-Gage Steel Shapes 12 
1.7 Stress-Strain Relationships in Structural Steel 13 
1.8 Modern Structural Steels 18 
1.9 Uses of High-Strength Steels 23 
1.10 Measurement of Toughness 24 
1.11 Jumbo Sections 25 
1.12 Lamellar Tearing 26 
1.13 Furnishing of Structural Steel 26 
1.14 The Work of the Structural Designer 30 
1.15 Responsibilities of the Structural Designer 30 
1.16 Economical Design of Steel Members 31 
1.17 Failure of Structures 33 
1.18 Handling and Shipping Structural Steel 36 
1.19 Calculation Accuracy 36 
1.20 Computers and Structural Steel Design 36 
CHAPTER 2 Specifications, Loads, and Methods of Design 
38 
2.1 Specifications and Building Codes 38 
2.2 Loads 40 
2.3 Dead Loads 40 
2.4 Live Loads 41 
2.5 Environmental Loads 44 
v 
2.6 	Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) and Allowable Strength Design (ASD) 49 
2.7 	Nominal Strengths 50 
2.8 	Shading 51 
2.9 	Computation of Loads for LRFD and ASD 51 
2.10 	Computing Combined Loads With LRFD Expressions 52 
2.11 	Computing Combined Loads With ASD Expressions 56 
2.12 	Two Methods of Obtaining an Acceptable Level of Safety 57 
2.13 	Discussion of Sizes of Load Factors and Safety Factors 58 
2.14 	Author's Comment 58 
2.15 	Problems for Solution 59 
CHAPTER 3 Analysis of Tension Members 	60 
3.1 	Introduction 60 
3.2 	Nominal Strengths of Tension Members 63 
3.3 	Net Areas 65 
3.4 	Effect of Staggered Holes 67 
3.5 	Effective Net Areas 72 
3.6 	Connecting Elements for Tension Members 82 
3.7 	Block Shear 84 
3.8 	Problems 92 
CHAPTER 4 Design of Tension Members 	101 
4.1 	Selection of Sections 101 
4.2 	Built-Up Tension Members 109 
4.3 	Rods and Bars 113 
4.4 	Pin-Connected Members 118 
4.5 	Design for Fatigue Loads 120 
4.6 	Problems 123 
CHAPTER 5 Introduction to Axially Loaded Compression Members 	127 
5.1 	General 127 
5.2 	Residual Stresses 130 
5.3 	Sections Used for Columns 131 
5.4 	Development of Column Formulas 135 
5.5 	The Euler Formula 137 
5.6 	End Restraint and Effective Lengths of Columns 138 
5.7 	Stiffened and Unstiffened Elements 142 
5.8 	Long, Short, and Intermediate Columns 146 
5.9 	Column Formulas 147 
5.10 	Maximum Slenderness Ratios 149 
Contents vii 
5.11 	Example Problems 149 
5.12 	Problems 156 
CHAPTER 6 	Design of Axially Loaded Compression Members 162 
6.1 	Introduction 162 
6.2 	AISC Design Tables 165 
6.3 	Column Splices 170 
6.4 	Built-Up Columns 173 
6.5 	Built-Up Columns with Components in Contact with each Other 174 
6.6 	Connection Requirements for Built-Up Columns Whose Components are in Contact with each Other 175 
6.7 	Built-Up Columns with Components not in Contact with each Other 181 
6.8 	Single-Angle Compression Members 186 
6.9 	Sections Containing Slender Elements 188 
6.10 	Flexural-Torsional Buckling of Compression Members 190 
6.11 	Problems 195 
CHAPTER 7 	Design of Axially Loaded Compression Members, Continued and Column Base Plates 199 
7.1 	Further Discussion of Effective Lengths 199 
7.2 	Frames Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions 204 
7.3 	Frames not Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions as to Joint Rotations 206 
7.4 	Stiffness-Reduction Factors 209 
7.5 	Columns Leaning on Each Other for In-Plane Design 213 
7.6 	Base Plates for Concentrically Loaded Columns 217 
7.7 	Problems 231 
CHAPTER 8 	Introduction to Beams 236 
8.1 	Types of Beams 236 
8.2 	Sections Used as Beams 236 
8.3 	Bending Stresses 237 
8.4 	Plastic Hinges 238 
8.5 	Elastic Design 239 
8.6 	The Plastic Modulus 239 
8.7 	Theory of Plastic Analysis 242 
8.8 	The Collapse Mechanism 243 
8.9 	The Virtual-Work Method 244 
8.10 	Location of Plastic Hinge for Uniform Loadings 248 
8.11 	Continuous Beams 249 
8.12 	Building Frames 251 
8.13 	Problems 253 
CHAPTER 9 Design of Beams for Moments 262 
9.1 	Introduction 262 
9.2 	Yielding Behavior--Full Plastic Moment, Zone 1 265 
9.3 	Design of Beams, Zone 1 266 
9.4 	Lateral Support of Beams 274 
9.5 	Introduction to Inelastic Buckling, Zone 2 276 
9.6 	Moment Capacities, Zone 2 280 
9.7 	Elastic Buckling, Zone 3 281 
9.8 	Design Charts 283 
9.9 	Noncompact Sections 287 
9.10 	Problems 289 
CHAPTER 10 Design of Beams--Miscellaneous Topics(Shear, Deflection, etc.) 295 
10.1 	Design of Continuous Beams 295 
10.2 	Shear 297 
10.3 	Deflections 303 
10.4 	Webs and Flanges with Concentrated Loads 308 
10.5 	Unsymmetrical Bending 316 
10.6 	Design of Purlins 319 
10.7 	The Shear Center 322 
10.8 	Beam-Bearing Plates 327 
10.9 	Lateral Bracing at Member Ends Supported on Base Plates 331 
10.10 	Problems 332 
CHAPTER 11 Bending and Axial Force 	339 
11.1 	Occurrence 339 
11.2 	Members Subject to Bending and Axial Tension 340 
11.3 	First-Order and Second-Order Moments for Members Subject to Axial Compression and Bending 343 
11.4 	Magnification Factors 345 
11.5 	Moment Modification or Cm Factors 346 
11.6 	Review of Beam-Columns in Braced Frames 348 
11.7 	Design of Beam-Columns--Braced or Unbraced 357 
11.8 	Review of Beam-Columns in Unbraced Frames 331 
11.9 	Problems 362 
CHAPTER 12 Bolted Connections 365 
12.1 	Introduction 365 
12.2 	Types of Bolts 365 
Contents ix 
12.3 	History of High-Strength Bolts 366 
12.4 	Advantages of High-Strength Bolts 367 
12.5 	Snug-Tight, Pretensioned, and Slip-Critical Bolts 367 
12.6 	Methods for Fully Pretensioning High-Strength Bolts 371 
12.7 	Slip-Resistant Connections and Bearing-Type Connections 373 
12.8 	Mixed Joints 375 
12.9 	Sizes of Bolt Holes 375 
12.10 	Load Transfer and Types of Joints 377 
12.11 	Failure of Bolted Joints 379 
12.12 	Spacing and Edge Distances of Bolts 380 
12.13 	Bearing-Type Connections--Loads Passing through Center of Gravity of Connections 384 
12.14 	Slip-Critical Connections--Loads Passing through Center of Gravity of Connections 394 
12.15 	Problems 399 
CHAPTER 13 Eccentrically Loaded Bolted Connections and Historical Notes on Rivets 407 
13.1 	Bolts Subjected to Eccentric Shear 407 
13.2 	Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension (Bearing-Type Connections) 421 
13.3 	Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension (Slip-Critical Connections) 424 
13.4 	Tension Loads on Bolted Joints 425 
13.5 	Prying Action 428 
13.6 	Historical Notes on Rivets 431 
13.7 	Types of Rivets 432 
13.8 	Strength of Riveted Connections--Rivets in Shear and Bearing 434 
13.9 	Problems 438 
CHAPTER 14 Welded Connections 	446 
14.1 	General 446 
14.2 	Advantages of Welding 447 
14.3 	American Welding Society 448 
14.4 	Types of Welding 448 
14.5 	Prequalified Welding 452 
14.6 	Welding Inspection 452 
14.7 	Classification of Welds 455 
14.8 	Welding Symbols 457 
14.9 	Groove Welds 459 
14.10 	Fillet Welds 461 
14.11 	Strength of Welds 462 
14.12 	AISC Requirements 463 
14.13 	Design of Simple Fillet Welds 468 
14.14 	Design of Connections for Members with Both Longitudinal and Transverse Fillet Welds 474 
14.15 	Some Miscellaneous Comments 475 
14.16 	Design of Fillet Welds for Truss Members 476 
14.17 	Plug and Slot Welds 480 
14.18 	Shear and Torsion 483 
14.19 	Shear and Bending 490 
14.20 	Full-Penetration and Partial-Penetration Groove Welds 492 
14.21 	Problems 494 
CHAPTER 15 Building Connections 	503 
15.1 	Selection of Type of Fastener 503 
15.2 	Types of Beam Connections 504 
15.3 	Standard Bolted Beam Connections 511 
15.4 	AISC Manual Standard Connection Tables 514 
15.5 	Designs of Standard Bolted Framed Connections 514 
15.6 	Designs of Standard Welded Framed Connections 517 
15.7 	Single-Plate, or Shear Tab, Framing Connections 519 
15.8 	End-Plate Shear Connections 522 
15.9 	Designs of Welded Seated Beam Connections 523 
15.10 	Designs of Stiffened Seated Beam Connections 525 
15.11 	Designs of Moment-Resisting FR Moment Connections 526 
15.12 	Column Web Stiffeners 530 
15.13 	Problems 533 
CHAPTER 16 Composite Beams 	536 
16.1 	Composite Construction 536 
16.2 	Advantages of Composite Construction 537 
16.3 	Discussion of Shoring 538 
16.4 	Effective Flange Widths 540 
16.5 	Shear Transfer 541 
16.6 	Partially Composite Beams 544 
16.7 	Strength of Shear Connectors 544 
16.8 	Number, Spacing, and Cover Requirements for Shear Connectors 545 
16.9 	Moment Capacity of Composite Sections 547 
16.10 	Deflections 552 
16.11 	Design of Composite Sections 554 
16.12 	Continuous Composite Sections 562 
16.13 	Design of Concrete-Encased Sections 563 
16.14 	Problems 566 
Contents xi 
CHAPTER 17 Composite Columns 571 
17.1 	Introduction 571 
17.2 	Advantages of Composite Columns 572 
17.3 	Disadvantages of Composite Columns 574 
17.4 	Lateral Bracing 574 
17.5 	Specifications for Composite Columns 575 
17.6 	Axial Design Strengths of Composite Columns 577 
17.7 	Shear Strength of Composite Columns 581 
17.8 	LRFD Tables 583 
17.9 	Load Transfer at Footings and Other Connections 584 
17.10 	Tensile Strength of Composite Columns 584 
17.11 	Axial Load and Bending 584 
17.12 	Problems 585 
CHAPTER 18 Cover-Plated Beams and Built-up Girders 	587 
18.1 	Cover-Plated Beams 587 
18.2 	Built-up Girders 590 
18.3 	Built-up Girder Proportions 592 
18.4 	Tension Field Action 598 
18.5 	Design of Stiffeners 602 
18.6 	Problems 609 
CHAPTER 19 Design of Steel Buildings 	610 
19.1 	Introduction to Low-Rise Buildings 610 
19.2 	Types of Steel Frames Used for Buildings 610 
19.3 	Common Types of Floor Construction 614 
19.4 	Concrete Slabs on Open-Web Steel Joists 615 
19.5 	One-Way and Two-Way Reinforced-Concrete Slabs 618 
19.6 	Composite Floors 620 
19.7 	Concrete-Pan Floors 620 
19.8 	Steel-Decking Floors 622 
19.9 	Flat Slabs 623 
19.10 	Precast Concrete Floors 624 
19.11 	Types of Roof Construction 626 
19.12 	Exterior Walls and Interior Partitions 627 
19.13 	Fireproofing of Structural Steel 627 
19.14 	Introduction to High-Rise Buildings 628 
19.15 	Discussion of Lateral Forces 630 
19.16 	Types of Lateral Bracing 631 
19.17 	Analysis of Buildings with Diagonal Wind Bracing for Lateral Forces 
637 19.18 Moment-Resisting Joints 639 
19.19 Design of Buildings for Gravity Loads 640 
19.20 Selection of Members 644 
APPENDIX A Derivation of the Euler Formula 
645 APPENDIX B Slender Compression Elements 
647 APPENDIX C Flexural-Torsional Buckling of Compression Members 650 APPENDIX D Moment-Resisting Column Base Plates 656 APPENDIX E Ponding 665 GLOSSARY 670 INDEX 000 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Building, Iron and steel -- Textbooks.
Steel, Structural -- Textbooks.
Statics -- Textbooks.