Table of contents for Case of Abraham Lincoln : a story of adultery, murder, and the making of a great president / by Julie M. Fenster.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

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CASE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS	
When I became interested in Lincoln¿s career as a lawyer about ten years ago, a person living far from Illinois had very little access to original source material. In the year 2000, the The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln Complete Documentary Edition, a three-volume DVD set, was issued, allowing anyone, anywhere to see the documents that describe that Lincoln¿s legal work. This book owes a great deal to that supremely thorough effort to collect every document on every case on which he worked. It is not only extensive, but well-organized. The Complete Edition was edited by Martha L. Benner and Collum Davis; the assistant editors were Daniel W. Stowell, Susan Krause, John A. Lupton, Stacy Pratt McDermott, Christopher Schnell and Dennis E. Suttles.
The Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee has a valuable archive especially rich in early publications on Lincoln. I am grateful to Dr. Douglas Wilson, an esteemed author and the director at that time for his help and suggestions. LMU was the first research site that I visited for this book. It also has a handsome museum devoted to the Lincolns.	
The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Illinois, encompasses the Illinois State Historical Society. It is a beautiful facility, and I am obliged to the ALPLM staff for advice and suggestions that benefitted this book enormously. Glenna SchroederLein and Jan Perone were very generous with their time in helping me. The first item I requested in the manuscripts Department was the 1860 diary of Philemon Stout, who was on the jury of the Anderson trial. To my surprise, I was told that someone was using it: the gentlement sitting across the table from me. That is how I met Richard E. Hart, who asked in his enthusiastic way about my research. He has created a gazeteer of Springfield in the year 1860 ¿ not so far off from 1856 ¿ and was kind enough to bring portions of it for my use in this book. Mr. Hart is currently the president of the Abaraham Lincoln Association, an old and yet vibrant organization located in Springfield.
In Illinois, the McLean County Historical Society¿s Stevenson-Ives Library in Bloomington has an old and invaluable collection; it is located in the old County Courthouse. I am particularly grateful to Ardys Serpette for her patience in finding many critical items for me. The Illinois Regional Archive Depository at the University of Illinois at Springfield found the probate records for the George Anderson estate, along with many other items from the case.
The Library of Congress was instrumental in the research. Two institutions near my home in upstate New York have collections of Lincoln books that are as good as any outside of Springfield: Cornell University and the Buffalo & Erie County Library. The Onondaga County Public Libarary Inter-Library Loan Department was diligent, as usual. I am also indebted to the State University of New York at Morrisville and Onondaga County Community College.
My aunt and uncle, Howard and Lynn Berk, arranged my trip to Harrogate, Tennessee, a town all the more charming because it isn¿t near anything except chains of mountains and the Cumberland Gap. As far as I could see, there was no way to get there from Upstate New York, except in a canoe. But my aunt and uncle picked me up at the Atlanta airport and drove me, for which I will always be grateful. My uncle interrupted work on his latest novel, to make the tour. I owe Richard Harfmann more than can ever be repaid for his encouragement from the inception of this project. He went on innumerable research trips with me, chatting on the way about all the latest news (of 1856) and seeing nothing of the local sights except the stacks at the libraries. 
Douglas Brinkley has been a friend for many years, a born teacher and stirring historian who has become a leader in the field. I was very fortunate that he took an interest in this book from the start.
My father was supportive in every way, from learning to use the photocopy machine at the Buffalo & Erie County Library to giving me dispensation to miss his birthday, in favor of working on the book. Thank you to him, to Paul and always Neddy.
CASE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS	
When I became interested in Lincoln¿s career as a lawyer about ten years ago, a person living far from Illinois had very little access to original source material. In the year 2000, the The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln Complete Documentary Edition, a three-volume DVD set, was issued, allowing anyone, anywhere to see the documents that describe that Lincoln¿s legal work. This book owes a great deal to that supremely thorough effort to collect every document on every case on which he worked. It is not only extensive, but well-organized. The Complete Edition was edited by Martha L. Benner and Collum Davis; the assistant editors were Daniel W. Stowell, Susan Krause, John A. Lupton, Stacy Pratt McDermott, Christopher Schnell and Dennis E. Suttles.
The Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee has a valuable archive especially rich in early publications on Lincoln. I am grateful to Dr. Douglas Wilson, an esteemed author and the director at that time for his help and suggestions. LMU was the first research site that I visited for this book. It also has a handsome museum devoted to the Lincolns.	
The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Illinois, encompasses the Illinois State Historical Society. It is a beautiful facility, and I am obliged to the ALPLM staff for advice and suggestions that benefitted this book enormously. Glenna SchroederLein and Jan Perone were very generous with their time in helping me. The first item I requested in the manuscripts Department was the 1860 diary of Philemon Stout, who was on the jury of the Anderson trial. To my surprise, I was told that someone was using it: the gentlement sitting across the table from me. That is how I met Richard E. Hart, who asked in his enthusiastic way about my research. He has created a gazeteer of Springfield in the year 1860 ¿ not so far off from 1856 ¿ and was kind enough to bring portions of it for my use in this book. Mr. Hart is currently the president of the Abaraham Lincoln Association, an old and yet vibrant organization located in Springfield.
In Illinois, the McLean County Historical Society¿s Stevenson-Ives Library in Bloomington has an old and invaluable collection; it is located in the old County Courthouse. I am particularly grateful to Ardys Serpette for her patience in finding many critical items for me. The Illinois Regional Archive Depository at the University of Illinois at Springfield found the probate records for the George Anderson estate, along with many other items from the case.
The Library of Congress was instrumental in the research. Two institutions near my home in upstate New York have collections of Lincoln books that are as good as any outside of Springfield: Cornell University and the Buffalo & Erie County Library. The Onondaga County Public Libarary Inter-Library Loan Department was diligent, as usual. I am also indebted to the State University of New York at Morrisville and Onondaga County Community College.
My aunt and uncle, Howard and Lynn Berk, arranged my trip to Harrogate, Tennessee, a town all the more charming because it isn¿t near anything except chains of mountains and the Cumberland Gap. As far as I could see, there was no way to get there from Upstate New York, except in a canoe. But my aunt and uncle picked me up at the Atlanta airport and drove me, for which I will always be grateful. My uncle interrupted work on his latest novel, to make the tour. I owe Richard Harfmann more than can ever be repaid for his encouragement from the inception of this project. He went on innumerable research trips with me, chatting on the way about all the latest news (of 1856) and seeing nothing of the local sights except the stacks at the libraries. 
Douglas Brinkley has been a friend for many years, a born teacher and stirring historian who has become a leader in the field. I was very fortunate that he took an interest in this book from the start.
My father was supportive in every way, from learning to use the photocopy machine at the Buffalo & Erie County Library to giving me dispensation to miss his birthday, in favor of working on the book. Thank you to him, to Paul and always Neddy.

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Career in law.
Trials (Murder) -- Illinois -- Springfield.
Poisoning -- Illinois -- Springfield -- History -- 19th century.
Adultery -- Illinois -- Springfield -- History -- 19th century.
Anderson, George, d. 1856 -- Death and burial.
Springfield (Ill.) -- Biography.
Presidents -- United States -- Biography.