Table of contents for This terrible war : the Civil War and its aftermath / Michael Fellman, Lesley J. Gordon, Daniel E. Sutherland.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Preface	000
Prologue	000
The Raid on Harpers Ferry	000
Military Defeat; Political Victory	000	000
Brown Welcomes Martyrdom	000	000
Purification Ritual	000	000
Political Reckoning	000	000
Southern Reaction to Brown	000	000
South versus North	000	000
PART ONE Before the War
CHAPTER ONE Commonalties and Conflict: Slavery and the American Republic	000
Commonalties	000
The Market Revolution	000
Perceptions of Sectionalism	000
The Antebellum North	000
The Antebellum South	000
Slavery Divides the Nation	000
Slavery in the North	000
Southern Staple Agriculture	000
The African Slave Trade	000
The Middle Passage	000
Slavery and the American Revolution	000
Debates at the Constitutional Convention	000
Quakers and Abolition	000
The Second Great Awakening	000
Reform Movements	000
The Decline of Slavery in the North	000
Southern Society	000
Free Blacks in the South	000
Slave Life	000
The Cotton Kingdom	000
Slavery Expands Westward	000
Indian Removal	000
The Missouri Compromise	000
The Nullification Crisis	000
Slave Rebellion	000
The Abolitionist Movement	000
Resistance to Abolition	000
Abolitionists Divided	000
Proslavery Defense	000
Slavery in the Territories	000
The Annexation of Texas	000
CHAPTER 2 Political Collapse: 1846[[endash]]1860	000
President Polk and Manifest Destiny	000
Slavery and Expansion	000
Stress of Expansion	000
Political Party System	000
Political Culture and Religion	000
Political Roles of Women	000
Sectional Tensions	000
Issue of Property	000
Election of 1848	000
Taylor¿s Compromise Plan	000
Southern Concerns	000
Fillmore Becomes President	000
Compromise of 1850	000
Nashville Convention	000
Election of 1852	000
Young America	000
Opposition to Fugitive Slave Law	000
Uncle Tom¿s Cabin	000
Altered Political Role of Women	000
Pierce¿s Miscalculations	000
Origins of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill	000
Opposition to the Kansas-Nebraska Bill	000
Distrust of Politicians	000
Democratic and Whig Losses	000
Civil War Synthesis	000
Cultural and Ethnic Issues	000
Know-Nothing Party	000
The Republican Party	000
Party Realignment	000
Bleeding Kansas	000
Sumner-Brooks Affair	000
Pottawatomie Massacre	000
Foreign Policy and Cuba	000
Ostend Manifesto	000
Election of 1856	000
New Republican Strategy	000
Attack on Slavocracy	000
Dred Scott	000
Kansas Politics and the Lecompton Controversy	000
Panic of 1857	000
Sectional Tensions Increase	000
Seward and Irrepressible Conflict	000
Emergence of Lincoln	000
Democratic Convention of 1860	000
Republican Convention	000
Constitutional Union Party	000
Sectional Campaign	000
Mood of the South	000
Election Results	000
PART TWO Civil War
CHAPTER 3 Southerners Secede and Amateurs Go to War	000
Southern Response to Lincoln¿s Election	000
The Deep South Secedes	000
President Buchanan¿s Reaction to Secession	000
Attempts at Compromise	000
The Upper South Delays Secession	000
Lincoln¿s First Inaugural Address	000
Fort Sumter Crisis	000
Lincoln Responds to the Firing on Fort Sumter	000
The Upper South Secedes	000
The Border South Stays in the Union	000
Southern Unionism	000
Americans Unprepared for War	000
The South¿s Perceived Martialism	000
Regional Martialism Compared	000
The North and the South Prepare for War	000
Civilians Become Soldiers	000
The Volunteers	000
Three Branches of Army	000
Unit Identity	000
Army Organization	000
The Artillery	000
The Cavalry	000
Motivations to Enlist	000
Anticipating Battle	000
The Anaconda Plan	000
Theaters of War	000
Irvin McDowell	000
Confederate Military Leaders	000
Strategy	000
Manassas	000
The Battle of Bull Run	000
Aftermath of Bull Run	000
George McClellan Takes Command	000
Western Virginia Campaign	000
The Battle of Ball¿s Bluff	000
All Quiet along the Potomac	000
The Confederacy and Foreign Diplomacy	000
The United States and Foreign Affairs	000
The Confederate Navy	000
New Naval Technology	000
The CSS Virginia	000
Confederate Naval Troubles	000
Raphael Semmes	000
The U.S. Navy	000
Gideon Welles	000
The Union Navy Grows and Expands	000
Problems Recruiting Sailors	000
Battle of Hatteras Inlet	000
Battle of Port Royal	000
The Trent Affair	000
CHAPTER 4 Discovering the Scope of War: 1861[[endash]]1862	000
Border Strategy in the West	000
War in Missouri	000
Iowa and Kansas Respond	000
Divided Missouri	000
War in Kentucky	000
Importance of Western Rivers	000
Forts Henry and Donelson	000
Union Gains in the Heartland	000
War in the Far West	000
New Mexico Campaign	000
Battle of Pea Ridge	000
Role of Native Americans	000
Confederate Setbacks in the East	000
New Confederate Strategy	000
Shiloh Campaign	000
Additional Union Gains	000
Confederate Conscription	000
George McClellan	000
Union War Board	000
Peninsula Campaign	000
Lee Takes Command	000
Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley	000
Seven Days¿ Battles	000
New Union Strategy	000
Halleck as General-in-Chief	000
John Pope	000
Second Bull Run Campaign	000
Antietam Campaign	000
Political Results of Antietam	000
Emancipation Proclamation	000
Dead of Antietam	000
Kentucky Campaign	000
Braxton Bragg	000
Military Impact	000
Problems of Decentralized Government	000
Material Costs of War	000
Confederate Economic Weaknesses	000
Union Economic Response	000
Industrial Challenges	000
Railroads	000
Northern Industry	000
CHAPTER 5 Reckoning with Slavery, Reckoning with Freedom	000
Republican Ambivalence toward Blacks	000
Lincoln¿s Views of Slavery	000
Flight to Freedom	000
Haphazard Union Policy	000
Abolitionist Union Officials	000
1862: Union War Aims Deepen	000
Congressional Emancipation Measures	000
Lincoln and Gradual Emancipation	000
The Second Confiscation Act	000
The Emancipation Proclamation	000
Welcoming the Emancipation Proclamation in the North	000
The Effects of the Proclamation	000
Black Enlistment and the Confederacy	000
Effects of Proclamation Abroad	000
The Limits of Emancipation	000
Black Refugees	000
Union Abuses of Freedmen	000
Black Protests over Union Abuses	000
The Wandering Life of Refugees	000
Experiments on Abandoned Lands	000
The Carolina Sea Islands Experiment	000
Another Experiment: Davis Bend	000
Labor Relations in Louisiana	000
Land Redistribution Schemes	000
The Freedmen¿s Bureau	000
Disintegration of Slavery in the Union Slave States	000
African Americans in the Union Army	000
White Officers and Black Men	000
Grudging Acceptance of Black Troops	000
Official Union Discrimination	000
Sherman¿s Policies	000
Lincoln¿s Policies	000
Blacks in Combat	000
Prisoners of War	000
Massacre at Fort Pillow	000
Reenslavement of Captured Black Soldiers	000
Prisoner Exchanges Collapse	000
Black Triumph	000
Black Veterans¿ Claims to Freedom	000
CHAPTER 6 Attack and Die: November 1862[[endash]]January 1863	000
Ambrose Burnside Takes Command	000
The Fredericksburg Campaign	000
William S. Rosecrans	000
Battle of Stones River	000
War¿s Destruction	000
Soldier Motivation	000
Civilians and War	000
Southern Home Front	000
Soldiers and the Home Front	000
Women and War	000
Soldier Life	000
Soldier Illness and Disease	000
Soldiers¿ Diet	000
Confederate Shortages	000
Uniforms	000
Soldier Equipment	000
Weapons	000
Tactics	000
CHAPTER 7 The Other War	000
Guerrilla Warfare	000
Types of Guerrilla Warfare	000
Third Type of Guerrilla Warfare	000
Impact of Guerrilla Warfare	000
Official Confederate Attitudes	000
Partisan Ranger Act	000
Union Response	000
New Union Military Policies	000
Prejudices of Union Soldiers	000
Confederate Excesses	000
Dissent on the Home Front	000
Copperheads	000
Lincoln¿s Response	000
Vallandigham Case	000
Additional Northern Protests	000
Davis¿s Response to Protest	000
Lincoln and Davis Compared	000
Ill Health of Davis	000
Confederate Political Parties	000
Personal Opposition to Davis	000
Southern Unionists	000
Antigovernment Confederates	000
General Confederate Dissent	000
Confederate Nationalism	000
Southern Refugees	000
Westward Emigration	000
Women Combatants and Spies	000
Charitable Work	000
Nurses	000
Assistance for Families	000
Female Employment	000
Changing Status of Women	000
Lack of Change	000
CHAPTER 8 An Inconclusive Year: 1863	000
Confederate Morale	000
Joseph Hooker	000
Hooker¿s Plan for the Chancellorsville Campaign	000
Lee¿s Problems	000
Lee¿s Daring Response	000
Death of Jackson	000
Consequences of Chancellorsville	000
Start of the Gettysburg Campaign	000
George G. Meade	000
The Battle of Gettysburg	000
Results of Gettysburg	000
Vicksburg Campaign	000
Grierson¿s Raid	000
Pemberton¿s Dilemma	000
The Siege	000
Results of Vicksburg	000
Confederate Diplomacy	000
The British Situation	000
Confederate Home Front	000
Elections of 1863	000
The Northern Mood	000
Northern Conscription	000
Northern Protests	000
New York Riots	000
The Chickamauga Campaign	000
The Battle of Chickamauga	000
The Siege of Chattanooga	000
The Battle of Lookout Mountain	000
The Battle of Missionary Ridge	000
Results of Chattanooga	000
Gettysburg Address	000
Significance of Address	000
Rituals of Mourning	000
Role of Religion	000
Desertion	000
Role of Communities	000
Role of Families	000
CHAPTER 9 A War of Exhaustion: 1864[[endash]]1865	000
Grant Comes to Washington	000
Grand Strategy	000
A War of Exhaustion	000
The Red River Campaign	000
The Union Bogs Down	000
Battle of the Wilderness	000
The Overland Campaign	000
Spottsylvania Court House	000
The Unwieldy Civil War Armies	000
Combat Refusal	000
The Slaughter at Cold Harbor	000
On to the Siege at Petersburg	000
Defeatism in the North	000
Confederate Political Problems	000
Sherman Takes Atlanta	000
Sherman¿s Psychological Warfare	000
Sherman¿s March to the Sea	000
Hood and Thomas in Tennessee	000
The Battle of Nashville	000
Confederate Morale in 1864	000
Lee¿s Army Crumbles	000
Confederate Home-front Morale Plunges	000
The Distress of Confederate Women	000
The U.S. Election of 1864	000
Confederate Desertion Increases	000
Peace Feelers: The Hampton Roads Conference	000
Confederate Experiments with Black Troops	000
Lee Vetoes Guerrilla Warfare	000
Lincoln¿s Second Inaugural Address	000
The Collapse of the Confederacy	000
The Fall of Richmond	000
Surrender at Appomattox	000
The Birth of the Lost Cause	000
Johnston¿s Surrender	000
Lincoln¿s Assassination	000
Lincoln and Reconstruction	000
Final Confederate Surrenders	000
The Union Army Disbands	000
PART THREE Aftermath of War
CHAPTER 10 Northern Politics and Southern Reconstruction: 1863[[endash]]1870	000
Mixed Responses to Peace	000
Postwar Trials	000
Northern Bitterness	000
Lincoln¿s Ten Percent Plan	000
Radical Ideas for Reconstruction	000
Lincoln¿s Late Thoughts on Reconstruction	000
Andrew Johnson	000
Johnson¿s Reconstruction Plan	000
Ex-Confederate Defiance	000
Congressional Reconstruction	000
Thaddeus Stevens and Radical Reconstruction	000
Congress versus the President	000
The Fourteenth Amendment	000
Elections of 1866	000
Radical Reconstruction	000
Impeachment	000
Johnson¿s Last Days	000
The Election of 1868	000
President Ulysses S. Grant	000
The Fifteenth Amendment	000
CHAPTER 11 White and Black Reconstruction in the South: 1865[[endash]]1872	000
The Mood of Ex-Confederates	000
Physical Condition of the South	000
Race Relations	000
Labor Shortages	000
Unionist Revenge	000
Confederate Exodus	000
Readjustment of White Hopes	000
Black Expectations and Uncertainty	000
Movement to Towns	000
Seeking Financial Freedom	000
Northern Assistance	000
Black Churches	000
Black Schools	000
Black Disappointment	000
Labor Problems	000
Violence toward Blacks	000
Republican Alliance in the South	000
Carpetbaggers	000
Scalawags	000
Black Political Role	000
Limits on the Black Political Role	000
Black Leadership	000
Southern Republican Divisions	000
Southern Republican Dilemma	000
Southern Republican Decline	000
The Gilded Age	000
Expansion of Government Power	000
Self-Defeating Southern Republican Programs	000
Southern Economic Problems	000
Sectional Economic Differences	000
Sharecropping and Tenant Farming	000
Southern Railroads a Key Factor	000
Southern Democratic Resurgence	000
CHAPTER 12 Destroying Reconstruction	000
The Rituals of White Supremacy	000
Fear of Black Independence	000
Lynching	000
The Softer Side of Paternalism	000
The Convict Lease System	000
Political Violence	000
The KKK	000
The White Line	000
Bourbon Politics	000
Divisions in the North	000
Northern Ambivalence on Enforcing Reconstruction	000
Northern Democrats	000
Northern Democrats Oppose Reconstruction	000
The 1868 Presidential Campaign	000
Republican Faltering on Reconstruction	000
Northern Business Expansion	000
Republicans as the Business Party	000
Scandals in the Grant Administration	000
The Liberal Republicans	000
The 1872 Campaign	000
The Depression of 1873	000
The Supreme Court Undercuts Reconstruction	000
Redeemer Tide Rising	000
The Election of 1876	000
The Compromise of 1877	000
Hayes Ends Reconstruction	000
Redeemers in Power	000
Continued Southern Poverty	000
Legalized Segregation	000
Increased Lynchings	000
The Antilynching Campaign of Ida B. Wells	000
Systematic Racial Discrimination	000
Northern Acquiescence to White Supremacism	000
The Supreme Court Accepts Segregation	000
The Troubling Legacy of Reconstruction	000
Epilogue: Remembering and Forgetting the Civil War: 1865[[endash]]Present	000
1913 Commemoration of Gettysburg	000
War Becomes Myth	000
The Lost Cause	000
Confederate Veterans	000
The UDC and SCV	000
Women and the Lost Cause	000
Northern Memory	000
Union Veterans	000
Generals¿ Wives	000
Monument Building	000
African American Memory	000
Memorial Day	000
Remembering Lincoln	000
The Politics of Memory	000
Dixiecrats	000
Memory and Popular Culture	000
The Civil War Centennial	000
The Confederate Flag	000
Civil War Memory Today	000
Remembering Reconstruction.	000
Forgetting	000
War¿s Lasting Legacy	000
Selected Bibliography	000
Documents	000
The Compromise of 1850	000
The Kansas-Nebraska Act, May 30, 1854	000
Stephen A. Douglas: Speech on the Kansas-Nebraska Bill	000
Dred Scott v. Sanford	000
Abraham Lincoln¿s ¿A House Divided¿ Speech	000
John Brown¿s Last Speech	000
The Political Platforms of 1860	000
South Carolina¿s Ordinance of Secession and Declaration of Causes of Secession	000
Abraham Lincoln¿s First Inaugural Address	000
Jefferson Davis¿s Inaugural Address	000
Speech by Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens	000
The Constitution of the Confederate States of America	000
General Benjamin F. Butler and General John C. Frémont on Slaves	000
The Emancipation Proclamation	000
The Gettysburg Address	000
The Republican and Democratic Electoral Platforms of 1864, and George B. McClellan¿s Acceptance Letter	000
William T. Sherman on the Inner Meaning of War	000
The Farewell Messages of Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee	000
The Wade-Davis Bill, Lincoln¿s Response, and the Wade-Davis Manifesto	000
Abraham Lincoln¿s Second Inaugural Address	000
Andrew Johnson¿s Amnesty Proclamation	000
Black Code of Mississippi	000
The Constitution of the United States: The Reconstruction Amendments	000
Plessy v. Ferguson	000	000
Credits	000
Index	000

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Influence.
United States -- Politics and government -- 1849-1877.