Table of contents for Case study research in applied linguistics / Patricia A. Duff.

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PREFACE
1.	CASE STUDY RESEARCH IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS
1.1.	Introduction
1.2.	Case Study of a Language Learner: ¿Jim¿ 
1.3.	Some Reflections on this Case Study
1.4.	Other Possible Applied Linguistic Analyses
1.5.	Summary
2.	DEFINING, DESCRIBING, AND DEFENDING CASE STUDY RESEARCH
2.1.	Introduction
2.2.	Defining Case Study
2.3.	Historical Roots of Case study in the Social Sciences
2.4.	General Features of Qualitative Research 
2.5.	Qualitative Research in Applied Linguistics 
2.6.	Purposes and Philosophical Underpinnings of Case Study
2.7.	Case Study versus Ethnography 
2.8.	Case Study in Applied Linguistics 
2.9.	Previous Scholarship on Case Study Methodology in Applied Linguistics 
2.10.	Longitudinal Case Studies 
2.11.	Advantages and Disadvantages of Case Study 
2.11.1.	Some Advantages of Case Study 
2.11.1.1.	Thick Description and Triangulation 
2.11.1.2.	Exploratory, Innovative Potential and Role in Theory-building
2.11.1.3.	Unique or Atypical Cases 
2.11.1.4.	Longitudinal Research
2.11.2.	Some (Claimed) Disadvantages of Case Study 
2.11.2.1.	 Generalizability 
2.11.2.2.	 Abnormal, Atypical, or Deviant Cases 
2.11.2.3.	 Thick Description and Triangulation 
2.11.2.4.	 ¿Objectivity¿ vs. ¿Subjectivity¿ 
2.11.2.5.	 The Role of Theory 
2.11.2.6.	 Attrition 
2.11.2.7.	 Statistical Analysis 
2.12.	Summary
3.	EXAMPLES OF CASE STUDIES IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS
3.1.	An Overview of Themes and Trends over the Past Three Decades
3.2.	Early Studies of Child Language Acquisition, Bilingualism, and Language Loss 
3.3.	Natural Order Studies and ¿Performance Analysis¿ (1960s-1980s)
3.4.	Individual Differences: Exceptionality, ¿Talented¿ and ¿Untalented¿ Learners
3.5.	Diaries, Memoirs, and (Auto-)Biographies of Linguistic Experiences
3.6.	Identity, Investment, and Gender in Language Learning
3.7.	Language Learning, Stabilization, and Fossilization
3.8.	Language Loss
3.9.	Pragmatic and Sociolinguistic Development
3.10.	Families as Cases: Studies of Bilingual Language Socialization and Maintenance
3.11.	Mainstreamed ESL Students: Identity, Representation, and Positioning
3.12.	Second-language Writing and Academic Discourse Socialization
3.13.	Online Language Development and Use: Socialization into Virtual Communities
3.14.	Bilingualism and Biculturalism: Immigrant, Sojourner and ¿Retournee¿ Identities
3.15.	Teachers as Agents of Linguistic and Cultural Socialization
3.16.	Summary
4.	HOW TO CONDUCT AND EVALUATE CASE STUDIES (PART 1): 
4.1.	Introduction
4.2.	Research Objectives
4.3.	Research Questions
4.4.	Research Design 
4.4.1.	Defining and Operationalizing Constructs
4.4.2.	Establishing Chains of Evidence
4.4.3.	Mixed-method Designs 
4.4.4.	Single-Case versus Multiple-Case Designs 
4.4.5.	Closed or Flexible Case Study Design 
4.5.	Case Selection and Sampling
4.5.1.	Sampling in Single-case Studies
4.5.2.	Sampling in Multiple-Case Studies
4.5.2.1.	Sampling Decisions in Four Studies about Identity and L2 Learning
4.6.	Contextualization
4.7.	Gaining Access to Research Sites 
4.8.	Data Collection: Sources of Evidence
4.9.	The Role of the Researcher
4.10.	Interviews
4.11.	Observation
4.12.	Keeping a Research Journal
4.13.	Triangulation
4.14.	Ethical Considerations
4.15.	Summary
5.	HOW TO CONDUCT AND EVALUATE CASE STUDIES (PART 2): 
5.1.	Introduction
5.2.	Transcription 
5.3.	Data analysis
5.3.1.	Cross-case Analysis
5.3.2.	Some Examples of Data Analysis Procedures
	5.3.3.	Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS)
5.4.		Member Checks
5.5.		Criteria for Evaluating Case Studies
5.5.1.	Validity and Reliability: Conflicting Positivist/Interpretive Criteria in Case Study
	5.5.1.1.	Positivist Criteria for Case Study
	5.5.1.2.	Interpretive Criteria for Case study
	5.5.1.3.	External Validity or Generalizability
	5.5.1.4. 	Reliability
5.5.2. 	Accuracy, Truthfulness, and ¿Thinking Outside the Box¿ 
5.6.	Summary
6.	WRITING THE CASE STUDY REPORT
6.1.	Introduction
6.2.	Audience, Publication Venue, and Focus: Preparing the Report
6.2.1.	Audience
6.2.2.	Publication Venue and Type: An Example
6.2.3.	Focus
6.3.	Organization and Content of Report
6.3.1.	Example 1
6.3.2.	Example 2
6.3.3. 	Example 3
6.3.4.	Organization and Content of Graduate Theses and Dissertations 
6.3.5. 	Other Organizational and Content Issues 
6.4.	Stylistic Matters
6.5. 	Voice and Reflexivity
6.6.	Visual Displays of Information
6.7.	Research Ethics
6.8. 	Appendices
6.9. 	Evaluating the Written Report
6.10. 	Summary 
6.11. 	Conclusion
REFERENCES
AUTHOR INDEX
SUBJECT INDEX

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Applied linguistics -- Case studies.
Applied linguistics -- Case studies.
Applied linguistics -- Research -- Methodology.