Table of contents for The politically incorrect guide to English and American literature / Elizabeth Kantor.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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 CONTENTS
Introduction
Part I: WHAT THEY DON¿T WANT YOU TO LEARN FROM ENGLISH LITERATURE (AN 
INTRODUCTION TO THE CANON, FROM BEOWULF TO FLANNERY O¿CONNOR)
Chapter 1:	Old English Literature: the Age of Heroes 
		Beowulf: The Hero and the Poem
		The Dream of the Rood
		¿This Life on Loan¿
		The Battle of Maldon
Chapter 2:	Medieval Literature: ¿Here is God¿s Plenty¿
		Middle English Poetry
		The Politically Incorrect World of the Middle Ages
		The Canterbury Tales vs. The Handmaid¿s Tale		
 The Fecundity of Medieval Art
 A Pre-Classical Aesthetic
 In the Light of Eternity
 Christianity and Freedom
 Separation of Church and State, Medieval Style
 The Argument from Authority
 The Invention of Chivalry
 
Chapter 3:	The Renaissance: Christian Humanism
		Christopher Marlowe
		William Shakespeare
		The Tragedies
		The Comedies
		The Sonnets
Chapter 4:	The Seventeenth Century: Religion as a Matter of Life and Death
		John Donne
		John Milton
Chapter 5:	Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Age of Reason
		Dead White Male #1: John Dryden
		Dead White Male #2: Alexander Pope
		Dead White Male #3: Jonathan Swift
		Dead White Male #4: Samuel Johnson
		¿The Proper Study of Mankind¿¿or Is It?
Chapter 6: 	The Nineteenth Century: Revolution and Reaction
		Revolutionary Repeat
		Wordsworth and Coleridge
		Byron and the Shelleys
		Keats
		Without a Room of Her Own
		Celebrating ¿Patriarchal Values¿
		Women Who are Bossy (and Talk Too Much)
		Men Who Aren¿t Patriarchal Enough
		The Benefits (to Women) of ¿Sexist¿ Conventions
		Victorian Literature
		Dickens
Chapter 7:	The Twentieth Century: The Avant-Garde and Beyond
		Decadents and Aesthetes
		Modernism
Chapter 8: 	American Literature: Our Own Neglected Canon
		Big Country, Short Attention Spans
		The Mystery of Evil
		The Possibility of Escape
Why We Should Still Read Huckleberry Finn (Despite the Ugly Racial Epithets)
Literature from the Deep South
¿A Hillbilly Thomist¿
Part II: WHY THEY DON¿T WANT YOU TO LEARN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN 
LITERATURE
Chapter 9: 	How the PC English Professors are Suppressing English Lit. (Not Teaching It)
	English Professors Teach Anything and Everything¿Except English Literature
	
	Why They Don¿t Want You to Read English and American Literature
	
	¿Theory¿¿Marxism, Feminism, Deconstruction, and Bashing Dead White Males
	Postmodernist Jargon: Hideously Ugly, Mentally Crippling
	Reality ¿ Denial as a Critical Stance
	
Chapter 10:	What Literature is For: ¿To Teach and Delight¿
	
	What Literature is Really For
	
	Which Literature is Truly Great?
	Truth, Beauty, and Goodness
Part III: HOW YOU CAN TEACH YOURSELF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN 
LITERATURE¿BECAUSE NOBODY IS GOING TO DO IT FOR YOU
	
Chapter 11:	How to Get Started (Once You Realize You¿re Going to Have to Read the 
Literature on Your Own)
	¿Close Reading¿
	Reed¿s Rule
	What Seems Like an Ordinary Line of Poetry
	The Nuts and Bolts of Literary Analysis
	
The Words Themselves (What They Mean, What They Sound Like, Where They 
Come From)
 A Use for English Grammar, After All
 Meter, Verse Forms, Genres, and Beyond
Chapter 12:	Learn the Poetry by Heart¿See the Plays¿Gossip about the Novels (That¿s Just 
What Jane Austen Did)
	Learn the Poetry by Heart
 See the Plays as Often as You Can¿or, Better Yet, Act in Them
Read the Great Novels, Lend Them to Your Friends, and Gossip about the 
Characters
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

English literature -- History and criticism.
English literature -- Study and teaching.
American literature -- History and criticism.
American literature -- Study and teaching.
Political correctness -- United States.