Table of contents for Human virology : a text for students of medicine, dentistry, and microbiology / Leslie Collier and John Oxford ; with illustrations by Jim Pipkin.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

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Contents
Abbreviations		xviii
	PART 1 General principles 		1
		1 Virology: How it all began		3
			1 Introduction		3
			2 How viruses were discovered		4
			3 How they were grown in the laboratory		4
			4 Sizes and shapes		4
			5 Replication		5
			6 The control of viral diseases		5
			7 Conclusions		5
		2 General properties of viruses 		7
			1 Introduction		7
			2 The architecture of viruses		8
			3 Classification of viruses		14
			4 Nomenclature of viruses		15
			5 The range of diseases caused by viruses		15
			6 Reminders		16
		3 Viral replication and genetics 		19
			1 Introduction		19
			2 The molecular biology of the mammalian cell		19
			3 Virus infection and replication in a host cell		20
			4 Virus assembly, release from the host cell, and maturation		26
			5 Genetic variation of viruses		27
			6 Reminders		27
		4 How viruses cause disease		29
			1 Introduction		29				2 Viral factors: pathogenicity and virulence		29
			3 Interactions between viruses and host cells		30
			4 The spread of viruses in the host		31
			5 Patterns of disease		37
			6 Shedding of virus from the host		38
			7 How infectious is a virus?		38
			8 Reminders		38
		 5 Resistance to virus infections		39
			1 Introduction: innate and adaptive immunity		39
			2 General factors in resistance		40
			3 Local non-speciÞc defences		41
			4 The adaptive immune system		43
			5 T cells and cell-mediated immunity		46
			6 Harmful immune responses		48
			7 Resistance and recovery		49
			8 Reminders		49
		 6 Viruses and cancer in humans		51
			1 Historical note		51
			2 General features of viral oncogenesis		53
			3 Viral oncogenes		54
			4 Cellular oncogenes		55
			5 Indirect mechanisms		56
			6 Viruses implicated in cancers of humans		56
			7 Reminders		57
		 7 	Viruses and the community		59
			 1 Introduction		59
			 2 DeÞnitions		59
			 3 What use is epidemiology?		60
			 4 Epidemiological methods		60
			 5 Serological epidemiology		61
			 6 Factors in the spread of viral infections		62
			 7 Herd immunity		63
			 8 Hospital-acquired infections		65
			 9 The periodicity of epidemics		66
			10 Control measures		67
			11 Reminders		68
PART 2 Special infections 		69
		 8 Upper respiratory tract and eye infections due to adenoviruses, coronaviruses 	71
(including SARS CoV), and rhinoviruses
			1 Introduction		71
			2 Adenoviruses		71
			3 Coronaviruses		73
			4 Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)		75
			5 Rhinoviruses		76
			6 Reminders		77
		 9 Childhood infections caused by paramyxoviruses		79
			1 Introduction		79
			2 Properties of the Paramyxoviridae		79
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects of paramyxovirus infections		81
			4 Reminders		85
		10 Orthomyxoviruses and inßuenza		87
			1 Introduction		87
			2 Properties of the orthomyxoviruses		87
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects		92
			4 Prevention and cure		93
			5 Reminders		94
		11 Gastroenteritis viruses		97
			1 Introduction		97
			2 Rotaviruses		97
			3 Adenoviruses		100
			4 Calciviruses		100
			5 Astroviruses		101
			6 Laboratory diagnosis		101
			7 Reminders		102
		12 Rubella: postnatal infections		103
			1 Introduction		103
			2 Properties of the virus		103
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects		103
			4 Reminders		106
		13 Parvoviruses		107
			1 Introduction		107
			2 Properties of the virus		107
			3 Clinical and pathological features		108
			4 Reminders		109
		14 Poxviruses		111
			1 Introduction		111
			2 Properties of the virus		111
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects of smallpox		113
			4 Other poxvirus infections		116
			5 Reminders		118
		15 Papovaviruses		119
			1 Introduction		119
			2 Properties of the viruses		119
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects of papillomavirus infections		121
			4 Clinical and pathological aspects of polyomavirus infections		124
			5 Reminders		126
		16 Poliomyelitis and other picornavirus infections		127
			1 Properties of the viruses		127
			2 Clinical and pathological aspects		129
			3 Control measures		136
			4 Reminders		136
		17 The herpesviruses: general properties		137
			1 ClassiÞcation		137
			2 Morphology		137
			3 Genome		138
			4 Polypeptides		138
			5 Antigens		138
			6 Replication		139
			7 Reminders		139
		18 The alphaherpesviruses: herpes simplex and varicella-zoster		141
			1 Herpes simplex viruses		141
			2 Varicella-zoster virus		146
			3 Herpesvirus B		147
			4 Reminders		148
		19 The betaherpesviruses: cytomegalovirus and human herpesviruses 6 and 7		149
			1 Cytomegalovirus		149
			2 Human herpesviruses types 6 and 7		151
			3 Reminders		152
		20 The gammaherpesviruses: Epstein/Barr virus and Kaposi's 		153
sarcoma-associated herpesvirus
			1 Epstein/Barr virus		153
			2 Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus		156
			3 Reminders		156
		21 Introduction to the hepatitis viruses		159
sarcoma-associated herpesvirus
			1 Hepatitis A		160
			2 Hepatitis B and deltavirus		160
			3 Hepatitis C		160
			4 Other hepatitis viruses		160
		22 The blood-borne hepatitis viruses B and delta		161
			1 Properties of hepatitis B virus		161
			2 Clinical and pathological aspects of hepatitis B virus infections		163
			3 Properties of delta virus		169
			4 Clinical and pathological aspects of hepatitis delta virus infections		170
			5 Reminders		170
		23 The enteric hepatitis viruses A and E		171
			1 Properties of hepatitis A virus		171
			2 Clinical and pathological hepatitis A virus infections		172
			3 Reminders		173
			4 Properties of hepatitis E virus		173
			5 Clinical and pathological aspects of hepatitis E virus infections		173
			6 Reminders		173
		24 The bloodborne hepatitis ßaviviruses		175
			1 Properties of hepatitis C virus		175
			2 Clinical and pathological aspects of hepatitis C virus infections		176
			3 The GBV viruses		177
			4 Reminders		178
		25 Retroviruses and AIDS		179
			1 Introduction		179
			2 Properties of HIV		180
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects of HIV		183
			4 The discovery of other human retroviruses: HTLV-I and HTLV-II		187
			5 Reminders		188
		26 Lyssavirus and rabies		189
			1 Introduction		189
			2 Properties of the virus		189
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects		190
			4 Reminders		194
		27 Arthropod-borne viruses		195
			1 Introduction		195
			2 Properties of the viruses		196
			3 Clinical and pathological aspects of arbovirus infections		197
			4 Reminders		203
		28 Exotic and dangerous infections: Þloviruses, arenaviruses, and hantaviruses		205
			1 Introduction		205
			2 Filoviruses		206
			3 Arenaviruses		208
			4 Hantaviruses		211
			5 Risk categories		213
			6 Reminders		213
		29 Prions and the spongiform encephalopathies		215
			1 Prion diseases		215
			2 What are prions?		217
			3 Pathogenesis and pathology		218
			4 Laboratory diagnosis		218
			5 Safety measures		218
			6 The great bovine spongiform encephalopathy outbreak		219
			7 Reminders		220
PART 3 Special syndromes 		221
		30 Viral diseases of the central nervous system		223
			1 Acute infections (Group 1)		225
			2 Acute postexposure syndromes (Group 2)		226
			3 Chronic infections (Group 3)		227
			4 Laboratory diagnosis		227
			5 Reminders		228
		31 Intrauterine and perinatal infections		229
			1 Pathogenesis		229
			2 Fetal immunity		230
			3 SpeciÞc infections		231
			4 Reminders		237
		32 Viral infections in patients with defective immunity		239
			1 Introduction		239
			2 Primary immunodeÞciencies		239
			3 Acquired immunodeÞciencies secondary to other diseases and their treatment	241
			4 Some special problems		241
			5 Diagnosis and treatment		244
			6 Reminders		244
		33 Respiratory infections		247
		34 Sexually transmitted viral infections		249
		35 Resurgent and emergent viral infections		253
			1 Introduction		253
			2 Factors favouring the resurgence of old enemies		254
			3 The emergence of new enemies		255
			4 Reminders		256
PART 4 Practical aspects 		257
		36 The laboratory diagnosis of viral infections		259
			1 Introduction		259
			2 Collecting and sending clinical specimens to the laboratory		260
			3 Rapid diagnostic methods		260
			4 Virus isolation in cell cultures		264
			5 Detection of antiviral antibodies		266
			6 Reminders		267
		37 Control of viral diseases by immunization		269
			1 The technology and practicalities of virus vaccine production and development	269
			2 Virus vaccines and public health		272
			3 Passive immunization		274
			4 New approaches to vaccine development		274
			5 Reminders		275
		38 Antiviral chemotherapy		277
			1 Points of action of antivirals in the virus life cycle		277
			2 The use of antivirals: general considerations		278
			3 Herpes infections		280
			4 Inßuenza		281
			5 HIV infections		281
			6 Interferons		283
			7 The future		283
			8 Reminders		283
 Appendices 		285
		 A Safety precautions: codes of practice, disinfection, and sterilization		287
			1 Introduction		287
			2 The clinical phase		287
			3 The laboratory phase		288
			4 Further reading		289
		 B Viral infections notiÞable in the UK		291
		 C Suggestions for further reading		293
			General virology		293
			Immunology		293
		 Index		295

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Medical virology.
Virus diseases.
Virology -- methods.
Virus Diseases -- microbiology.
Virus Replication.
Viruses -- pathogenicity.