Table of contents for Screens fade to black : contemporary African American cinema / David J. Leonard.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
contents page
Contents
Dedication
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1: Screens Fade to Black, But Little Has Changed
Celebrating the 2002 Oscars
Defining African American Cinema
A New Racism: Popular Culture and Colorblind Discourse
Toward an Understanding of the New Racism
Chapter 2: The Ghettocentric Imagination
Baby Boy
Antwone Fisher
Training Day
Prison Song
Conclusion
Chapter 3: Is this Really African American Cinema? Black Middle Class Dramas and Hollywood
Drumline
Love and Basketball
Brown Sugar
Good Fences
Conclusion
Chapter 4: Blackness as Comedy: Laughter and the American Dream
Soul Plane
Bringing Down the House
Barbershop
Barbershop 2
Comedies as Transgression
Undercover Brother
Bamboozled
Conclusion
Chapter 5: Moving Forward without Moving Back
The 2005 Oscars
Just Scenery: Authenticating Hip Hop and the American Dream
White Stories, Black Face: My Baby¿s Daddy and Love Don¿t Cost a Thing
The Longest Yard
Erasing Race and Whitening Pictures
Crossover Appeal: Transcending African American Cinema
Cinematic Opposition in a Barren Marketplace
Conclusion
Appendix
Bibliography

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

African Americans in motion pictures.
African Americans in the motion picture industry.