Table of contents for Holographic visions : a history of new science / Sean F. Johnston.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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CONTENTS
List of Figures xvii
1. Introduction: Seeking Coherence 1
PART I: CREATING A SUBJECT 13
2. Wavefront reconstruction in Britain and beyond 15
2.1 Introduction 15
2.2 Holoscopy 22
2.3 'A new microscopic principle' 30
2.4 Microscopy by reconstructed Wavefronts 33
2.5 The Diffraction Microscope at Imperial College 34
2.6 Gordon Rogers and 'D.M.' 37
2.7 The Californian connection 43
2.8 Adolf Lohmann in Germany 48
2.9 The decline of diffraction microscopy 51
3. Wave Photography in the Soviet Union 60
3.1 The Vavilov State Optical Institute and the Backdrop of Soviet Science 60
3.2 Yuri Denisyuk and his Kandidat Research 63
3.3 Wave Photographs 71
3.4 Pause and Reception 74
4. Lensless Photography in America 78
4.1 The Willow Run Laboratories and optical processing 78
4.2 From optical processing to wavefront reconstruction 95
4.3 Lensless photography 99
4.4 Three-dimensional wavefront reconstruction 102
5. Constructing Holography 120
5.1 Introduction 120
5.2 George stroke and the packaging of holography 123
5.3 The Nobel Prize and historiographical validation 142
5.4 Patents, Priority, and Profits 145
5.5 Finding coherence 147
PART II: CREATING A MEDIUM 149
6. Early Exploitation 151
6.1 Satisfying sponsors at the University of Michigan 151
6.2 Seducing investors at Conductron 159
6.3 Ann Arbor, 'holography capital of the world' 168
6.4 Seeking applications further afield 175
6.5 Expansion in the East 180
7. Technology of the Sublime: The Versatile Hologram 189
7.1 Prospects and problems 189
7.2 Inventing and reinventing holographic interferometry 191
7.3 The Americanization of reflection holography 200
7.4 Image-plane holograms 202
7.5 3608 holograms 204
7.6 Pulsed holograms 206
7.7 Rainbow holograms 209
7.8 Holographic stereograms 212
7.9 Computer-generated holograms 216
7.10 Photosensitive materials 220
7.11 The medium and its message 227
PART III: CREATING AN IDENTITY 229
8. Defining the Scientific Holographer 231
8.1 Reshaping optical engineering for holographers 231
8.2 Carving a niche with journals 235
8.3 Meetings as social nuclei 242
8.4 Defining the holographer 250
9. Culture and Counterculture: The Artisanal Holographer 253
9.1 Introduction 253
9.2 Challenging the orthodox optical laboratory: material culture and community identity 262
9.3 Training artisans: the birth of schools 271
9.4 Transmitting the counterculture: practical publications 280
9.5 Shaping and reshaping an identity 283
10. Aesthetic Holographers and Their Art 287
10.1 Introduction 287
10.2 Artist-scientist collaborations 290
10.3 Artists and artisans 303
10.4 Formalizing the art: accredited schools 305
10.5 Distinguishing subcultures 308
10.6 Enchanting audiences through exhibitions 312
10.7 Critiques from mainstream art 317
11. Building Holographic Communities 325
11.1 Uncertain identities 325
11.2 Strengthening networks 327
11.3 Special congregations: symposia 330
11.4 Special places: museums 334
PART IV: CREATING A MARKET 347
12. Commercialization and Ubiquity 349
12.1 Making holography pay 349
12.2 Entrepreneurs and cottage industry 356
12.3 Optimistic investment: the Ilford story 367
12.4 Embossed holograms and profitability 372
12.5 Patents and commercial holography 378
12.6 Security and its influences 386
13. The hologram and popular culture 393
13.1 Shock and awe 393
13.2 From the sublime to kitsch 398
13.3 Persistent ideas 402
13.4 Holograms as analogy and paradigm 409
13.5 Conflicting values and competing meanings 413
14. Conclusion: Creative Visions 415
14.1 Through a glass darkly: visions of scientific genesis 415
14.2 Assessing progress: visions of successful technology 418
14.3 Preserving and predicting: visions of the past and future 433
14.4 Careers in light: visions of technical identity 438
14.5 Imagined and invented futures 441
Bibliography 449
Archives Consulted 450
Interviews 450
Books 451
Papers and articles 456
Unpublished communications 481
Appendix 447
Publication statistics 447
Index 491

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Holography -- History.