Table of contents for Interpreting the Historical Books : an exegetical handbook / by Robert B. Chisholm, Jr.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents in Brief
		Series Preface
		Preface
		Abbreviations
	1.	What Is Narrative Literature?
	2.	Primary Themes of the Historical Books
	3.	Preparing for Interpretation
	4.	Interpreting Narrative Texts
	5.	Proclaiming Narrative Texts
	6.	From Text to Application: Two Samples
		Glossary
Contents
		Series Preface
		Preface
		Abbreviations
	1.	What Is Narrative Literature?
The Literary Dimension in Narrative
Basic Elements of a Story
Setting
Characterization
Plot
Structural Features
Discourse Structure
Dramatic Structure
Paneled Sequences
Chiasmus
Overlapping Accounts and Flashbacks
Quotation and Dialogue
Discourse Types
Speech Function
Gaps and Ambiguity
The Narrator's Authority and Perspective
Macroplot
Intertextuality
Foreshadowing
Parallelism and Narrative Typology
Allusion
Echoing
Repetition of Keywords
Conclusion: Interpretive Principles
	2.	Primary Themes of the Historical Books
Joshua
Primary Themes
Overall Purpose
Judges
Primary Themes
Overall Purpose
Ruth
1/2 Samuel
Primary Theme
A Prophet Arrives (1 Sam. 1/7)
Choosing a King (1 Sam. 8/12)
Kingship Makes a False Start (1 Sam. 13/15)
The Story of David (1 Sam. 16/2 Sam. 20)
Reflecting on David's Career (2 Sam. 21/24)
1/2 Kings
Primary Themes
Seeds of Destruction: Solomon's Reign (1 Kings 1/11)
Disintegration and Tragedy: The Divided Kingdom (1 Kings 12/2 Kings 
25)
1/2 Chronicles
Primary Theme
National Unity and a Royal Ideal: David and Solomon (1 Chron. 1/
2 Chron. 9)
A Paradigm for Godly Leadership: Lessons from the Davidic Dynasty 
(2 Chron. 10/36)
Ezra/Nehemiah
Ezra
Nehemiah
Primary Themes
Esther
Thematic Summaries
The Deuteronomistic History: Joshua/2 Kings
The Postexilic Literature: 1/2 Chronicles, Ezra/Nehemiah, Esther
Overall Thematic Synthesis of the Historical Books
	3.	Preparing for Interpretation
Setting the Stage for the Historical Books
Biblical Chronology
The Conquest, Judges, and United Monarchy (1400/931 B.C.)
1400/1200 B.C.
1200/931 B.C.
The Divided Monarchy (931/722 B.C.)
931/841 B.C.
841/745 B.C.
745/722 B.C.
The Kingdom of Judah (722/586 B.C.)
722/681 B.C.
681/626 B.C.
626/586 B.C.
The Exile and Return (586/433 B.C.)
Determining What the Text Is: Textual Criticism
Introduction
Two Basic Principles
One Should Not Automatically Assume That the Traditional Hebrew 
(Masoretic) Text Preserves the Original Text
One Should Base Text Critical Decisions Primarily on Internal 
Considerations
Deciding What the Text Says: Translation
Semantics
Tools
Method and Principles
Syntax
Intermediate Grammars
Advanced Grammars
Reading What Others Have to Say: Some Bibliographical Aids
Introductions
Works on Narratival Art
Individual Books
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1/2 Samuel
1/2 Kings
1/2 Chronicles
Ezra/Nehemiah
Esther
	4.	Interpreting Narrative Texts
Diachronic Methods
Evidence for Sources
Critical Challenges to Textual Unity
A Case Study: David and Goliath
The Need for Literary and Theological Sensitivity
Harmonizations: The Need for Caution
Synchronic Methods
Focus on Unity
Respecting the Author's Authority
Identifying the Implied Reader(s)
A Proposed Exegetical-Literary Method
	5.	Proclaiming Narrative Texts
A Proposed Homiletical Strategy
Finding the Principle(s)
Applying the Principle(s)
	6.	From Text to Application: Two Samples
Bloodbath at Bethel: Some Bad Boys, a Bald Prophet, and Two Savage She-Bears 
(2 Kings 2:23/25)
What is the Text? What Does the Text Say?
What Did the Text Mean?
Place the Text in Its Context
Evaluate the Text from a Literary Point of View
Comments on Discourse Structure
Summarize the Theme(s) of the Story and How They Contribute to the 
Theme(s) of the Book as a Whole
Consider How the Story Should Have Impacted the Implied Reader(s), Given 
Their Time, Place, and Circumstances
What Does the Text Mean to Contemporary Readers in the Community of 
Faith?
A Light in the Darkness: Sacrificial Love on Display (Ruth 1)
What Is the Text? What Does the Text Say?
What Did the Text Mean?
Place the Text in Its Context
Evaluate the Text from a Literary Point of View
Comments on Discourse Structure
Summarize the Theme(s) of the Story and How They Contribute to the 
Theme(s) of the Book as a Whole
Consider How the Story Should Have Impacted the Implied Reader(s), Given 
Their Time, Place, and Circumstances
What Does the Text Mean to Contemporary Readers in the Community of 
Faith?
		Glossary

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Bible. O.T. Historical Books -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.