Table of contents for Apuleius and drama : the ass on stage / Regine May.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
A Note on Texts and Translations13
Abbreviations 15
1.Introduction 1
1.1.Apuleius and Drama: The Purpose of This Book 1
1.2.Scholarship and Methodology 4
1.3.Comedy, Mime, and the Novel 10
2.Knowledge of Drama and Archaism in the Second Century 16
2.1.Introduction 16
2.2.Tragedy and Comedy in Greece 19
2.3.Watching Plays in the Roman World 21
2.4.Theatrical Archaeology in North Africa 22
2.5.Education through Studying Drama: The Sophists Case 25
2.6.SecondCentury Archaism and Apuleius 27
2.7.Conclusion 43
3.Drama Philosophy, and Rhetoric: Apuleius Minor Works45
3.1.Introduction 45
3.2.Quotations from Drama in Apuleius De Deo Socratis45
3.3.De Mundo and De Platone et eius Dogmate53
3.4.Drama in the Florida55
3.5.An Apuleian Translation from Greek Comedy: Anechomenos63
3.6.Conclusion71
4.Courtroom Drama: Apuleius Apologia73
4.1.Introduction73
4.2.Exordium (Introduction) 1380
4.3.Refutation of Subsidiary, Nonmagical Charges 42481
4.4.Refutation of Minor Magical Charges 25.56587
4.5.Refutation of Major Charges concerning Pudentillas Marriage 6610199
4.6.Conclusion106
5.The Texture of the Metamorphoses109
5.1.Introduction109
5.2.The Prologue110
5.3.Comedy in Prose: Comic Elements of the Narrative Texture115
5.4.Conclusion127
6.The Drama of Aristomenes and Socrates128
6.1.Introduction128
6.2.Dramatic Posturing129
6.3.What Kind of Drama?132
6.4.Crossing the Genres139
6.5.Metatheatre and Metafiction140
6.6.Conclusion141
7.A Parasite in a Comic Household143
7.1.Introduction143
7.2.Lucius Comic Characterization: Lucius as a Parasite?143
7.3.Milos House: A domus comica (Comic Household)156
7.4.Conclusion180
8.The Risus Festival: Laughing at Laughter182
8.1.Introduction182
8.2.Comedy and Theatrical Setting182
8.3.Risus Festival: History or Apuleian Invention?187
8.4.The God Risus and his Sources188
8.5.Why Laughter?190
8.6.Forum and Theatre: The Setting of the Trial192
8.7.The Crime: Killing the Wineskins195
8.8.Apuleius and Aristophanes198
8.9.Young Drunkards202
8.10.Actor and Auctor205
8.11.Conclusion205
9.Cupid and Psyche: A Divine Comedy208
9.1.Introduction208
9.2.Elements of Tragedy209
9.3.Beyond Tragedy212
9.4.Comedy215
9.5.Mythological Travesties in Comedy: Plautus Amphitruo216
9.6.Plautine Tragicomedy and Apuleius Cupid and Psyche219
9.7.Apuleius dramatis personae221
9.8.Conclusion246
10.Charite: How Comedies Do Not End249
10.1.Introduction249
10.2.The Old Woman as a Dramatic Nurse250
10.3.Charites Dream252
10.4.Feminine Suicides255
10.5.Scaena and persona257
10.6.Charites Comedy260
10.7.Charites Tragedy265
10.8.Conclusion268
11.Seneca cannot be too heavy, nor Plautus too light: Metamorphoses, Book 10269
11.1.Introduction269
11.2.The Inset Tales: Phaedra and Menander270
11.3.The Main Narrative: Miles gloriosus and Cooks295
11.4.Conclusion305
12.The End: Isis: Dea ex machina?307
12.1.Introduction307
12.2.Tragedy310
12.3.Comedy314
12.4.Why Isis?318
12.5.The Anteludia324
12.6.Conclusion and Outlook327
13.Conclusion329
Bibliography333
Index000

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Apuleius. Metamorphoses.
Apuleius -- Knowledge -- Latin drama (Comedy).
Latin drama (Comedy) -- History and criticism.