Table of contents for Buddhist psychology / Geshe Tashi Tsering ; foreword by Lama Zopa Rinpoche ; edited by Gordon McDougall.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Contents
Foreword by Lama Zopa Rinpoche	ix
Preface	xi
Editor's Preface	xv
1. Mind in Buddhism	1
An Inner Science	1
The Mind in Buddhist Texts	4
The Monastic Study of The Mind	8
Why Study the Mind?	10
The Nature of Mind	12
Mind Is Not Body	13
Mind Is Clear and Knowing	16
Conclusion	19
2. Main Mind and Mental Factors	21
Main Mind	21
The Six Main Minds	24
The Sensory Main Minds	27
Mental Factors	29
Always-Present Mental Factors	30
Contact	31
Discernment	31
Feeling	32
Intention	34
Attention	36
Object-Ascertaining Mental Factors	37
Aspiration	38
Appreciation	39
Recollection	39
Concentration	40
Intelligence	41
3. Mental Afflictions	43
Variable Mental Factors	43
Sleep	43
Regret	44
General Examination	45
Precise Analysis	45
The Three Zones	45
The First Zone and The Three Main Mental Afflictions	50
Ignorance	51
Attachment	53
Aversion	54
The Second Zone	54
The Third Zone	58
Looking at Individual Mental Factors	59
How the Derivative Mental Afflictions Arise	61
4. Dealing With Negative Emotions	65
The Cause of Anger	68
Anger and Logic	70
Meditating on Anger	71
Developing Equanimity	73
Offering the Victory to Others	74
Developing Patience	76
Developing Love	79
5. Wholesome Mental Factors	81
The Three Fundamental Positive Minds	81
The Traditional Eleven Positive Minds	84
The Pyramid of the Three Trainings	86
Positive Minds in The Second Zone	88
The Noble Eightfold Path in the Three Zones	88
Compassion and Self-Confidence	90
Positive Minds in The Third Zone	91
Work Toward Long-term Goals	93
6. Epistemology: Conception and Perception	95
Epistemology in Buddhism	95
Conception	96
Conceptual Thoughts Engage Through Elimination	98
Conceptual Thoughts Are Always Mistaken	99
Conceptual Thoughts Provide Cognitive Content	101
Implicative and Nonimplicative Negation	102
How the Mind Generalizes	103
Perception	106
Aspect	107
Comparing Perceptual and Conceptual Minds	110
Valid Cognition	113
Pramana	113
The Etymology of Pramana	114
Nondeceptiveness	115
Novelty	116
Inferential Valid Cognitions	118
7. Moving Toward Knowledge	121
The Sevenfold Division	121
Wrong Consciousnesses	121
Doubting Consciousnesses	126
Non-Ascertaining Consciousnesses	127
Correctly Assuming Consciousnesses	128
Subsequent Cognizers	129
Inferential Cognizers	129
Valid Direct Perceivers	130
Differences in Process Between Wisdom and Method	133
Appendix: The Fifty-one Mental Factors	137
Notes	139	
Glossary	142
Bibliography	149
Index	151
About the Authors	159
The Foundation of Buddhist Thought	160

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Buddhism -- Psychology.
Knowledge, Theory of (Buddhism).