Table of contents for Violent video game effects on children and adolescents : theory, research, and public policy / by Craig A. Anderson, Douglas A. Gentile, and Katherine E. Buckley.

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I. PART 1. INTRODUCTION
A. CHAPTER 1
I. VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES: BACKGROUND AND CONTENT
1. A Brief History
2. Youth Exposure
II. THEORETICAL OVERVIEW AND THINGS TO COME
B. CHAPTER 2
I. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENT ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA
1. Definitions of Aggression
a. Subtypes of Aggression
i. Physical and violence
ii. Verbal aggression
iii. Relational aggression
2. Research and Review Methodologies
a. Experimental, Cross-section Correlational, and Longitudinal Studies
i. Three types of studies
ii. Other considerations
iii. Mixed designs
b. Narrative and Meta-analytic Reviews
3. Science, Causality, and Alternative Explanations (9 principles)
a. Scientific theories or models are causal
b. Scientific causality is often probabilistic
c. Establishing causality largely involves ruling out plausible alternative explanations
d. Different methodologies allow triangulation on the most plausible causal mode
e. Conceptual relations between variables generalize
f. Laboratory paradigms are valid
g. Aggression is best understood when viewed as existing along a severity continuum
h. The effects of some risk factors accrue over time
i. A general understanding of human aggression requires a general perspective
4. Prior Violent Television and Film Research 
a. Examples of Cross-Section Correlational Studies
b. Examples of Experimental Studies
c. Examples of Longitudinal Studies
d. Summary of Prior Violent Television/Film Research
5. Prior Violent Video Game Research
a. Examples of Cross-Section Correlational Studies
b. Examples of Experimental Studies
c. Longitudinal Studies
d. Summary of Prior Violent Video Game Research
i. Meta-analytic overview
ii. Contextualized overview
C. CHAPTER 3
I. THE GENERAL AGGRESSION MODEL
1. General Aggression Model: Overview
a. A Knowledge Structures Approach 
b. Proximate Causes & Processes: The Social Episode
c. Distal Causes & Processes: Development of Aggressive Personality
2. General Aggression Model Summary: Multiple Causes of Aggression
II. A FOCUS ON DEVELOPMENT 
1. Risk and Resilience
2. Developmental Tasks
III. GAM, MEDIA VIOLENCE, AND AGGRESSION
II. Part 2. NEW STUDIES
A. CHAPTER 4
I. STUDY 1: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS
1. Methods
a. Participants
b. Experimental Materials and Measures
i. Video games
ii. Aggressive behavior
c. Post-experimental Questionnaire
i. Experimental game ratings
ii. Violent behavior history
iii. Adult involvement
iv. General media use habits
v. Media violence exposure
d. Procedure
2. Results
a. Ratings of the Assigned Video Game
i. Entertainment ratings
ii. Frustration ratings
iii. Violence ratings
iv. Summary
b. Short Term Aggression in the Lab
i. Game ratings
ii. Main analyses
c. Individual Difference Effects on Laboratory Aggression
i. Media violence exposure
ii. Bedroom media
iii. Violence preferences
iv. Adult involvement
d. Media Violence Exposure and Violent Behavior
i. Main regression results
ii. Adult involvement as a moderator
iii. Old versus new violent media
iv. Summary of media violence and violent behavior results
3. Discussion
B. CHAPTER 5
I. STUDY 2: CORRELATIONAL STUDY WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
1. Methods
a. Participants
b. Materials
i. Attitudes towards and beliefs about violence
ii. Aggressive behavior, hostility, and anger
iii. Trait forgivingness
iv. Normative aggressive beliefs
v. Violent behavior
vi. Media exposure
c. Procedure
2. Results
a. Zero Order Correlations
i. Video game violence effects
ii. Predicting GPA
iii. Attitudes towards violence
iv. Positive orientation to violence
b. Regression Analyses: Destructive Testing
i. Video game violence and violent behavior
ii. Video game violence and physical aggression
iii. Video game violence and verbal aggression
iv. Forgivingness and violent behavior, physical aggression & verbal aggression
v. Total screen time and GPA
c. Regression Analyses: Moderator Effects (sex, forgivingness, POV)
d. Regression Analyses: Old versus New Violent Media
3. Discussion
C. CHAPTER 6
I. STUDY 3: LONGITUDINAL STUDY WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS
1. Method
a. Participants
b. Procedure
c. Assessment of Social Adjustment
i. Peer assessment of social adjustment
ii. Teacher ratings of social adjustment
iii. Self-report of fights
d. Assessment of Media Habits
i. Violent media exposure
ii. Amount of television watching and video game play
e. Assessment of Hostile Attribution Bias/Social Information Processing
f. Composite Measures
2. Results: Correlational Analyses
a. Single Point in Time Correlations
b. Lagged Correlations: Looking Forward and Backward in Time
3. Results: Regression Analyses
a. Destructive Testing
i. Video game violence and hostile attribution bias
ii. Video game violence and verbal aggression
iii. Video game violence and physical aggression
iv. Video game violence and prosocial behavior
v. Total screen time and school performance
b. Path Analyses
c. Regression Analyses: Old versus New Violent Media
4. Discussion
D. CHAPTER 7
I. RISK FACTOR ILLUSTRATIONS
1. Violence Risk Factors for Children (Study 1)
2. Violence Risk Factors for High School Students (Study 2)
3. More Violence Risk Factors for Children (Study 3)
III. PART 3. GENERAL DISCUSSION (WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?)
A. CHAPTER 8
I. NEW FINDINGS
1. Experimental
2. Cross-section Correlational
3. Longitudinal
4. Old Versus New Violent Media
II. VULNERABILITY, RISK, AND RESILIENCE
III. TRIANGULATION, MEDIA VIOLENCE, AND THE GENERAL AGGRESSION MODEL
IV. DEVELOPMENTAL THEORY IMPLICATIONS
B. CHAPTER 9
I. EFFECT SIZE
II. CATHARSIS
1. Flaw 1: Aggression is not a drive
2. Flaw 2: Even if catharsis could work, modern media do it incorrectly
3. Flaw 3: Dearth of supportive and glut of contradictory empirical evidence
4. Flaw 4: The brain is what the brain does
5. Summary
III. PUBLIC POLICY
1. General Issues
2. Policy Debates and Industry Response 
3. Policy Options
a. Education
b. Voluntary ratings by the industries
c. Warning labels
d. Licensing requirements
e. Mandatory ratings by the industries
f. Governmental ratings of an advisory nature
g. Mandatory universal ratings provided or validated by an independent third party
h. Legal access restrictions
i. Governmental restrictions on production
C. CHAPTER 10
I. REDUCING VIOLENT VIDEO GAME EFFECTS
II. CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
IV. REFERENCES
V. FOOTNOTES
VI. TABLES
VII. FIGURE CAPTIONS AND FIGURES
VIII. APPENDIX
IX. BOXES

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Video games and children.
Video games and teenagers.
Violence in mass media.
Children and violence.
Youth and violence.
Aggressiveness in children.
Aggressiveness in adolescence.