Table of contents for Construction project administration / Edward R. Fisk, Wayne Reynolds.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
CONTENTS
 1	THE PROJECT DELIVERY SYSTEM	1
Project Participants 1
Construction Administration 2
Control of Quality in Construction 7
Organizational Structure of a Construction Project 8
Professional Construction Management 14
Design-Build Contracts 18
Definitions of Individual Construction Responsibilities 21
Defining Scope of Work in a CM Contract 25
Responsibility for Coordination of the Trades 27
The Partnering Concept 28
Contracting for Public Works Projects 31
Problems 33
 2	RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY	35
The Resident Project Representative and Inspectors as Members of the Construction Team 35
Lines of Authority on Construction Projects 35
Why Have an Inspector? 37
Authority and Responsibility of the Resident Project Representative 39
Problems 49
 3	RESIDENT PROJECT REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE RESPONSIBILITIES	50
Setting Up a Field Office 50
Familiarization with Construction Documents 52
Equipping the Field Office 53
Establishment of Communications 56
Handling Job-Related Information 60
Staffing Responsibilities 61
Derivation of the Field Cost Indexes 64
Selection of Trailer-Type Field Offices 66
Construction Safety 68
Development of an Inspection Plan 68
Other Job Responsibilities 70
RFIs (Requests for Information) 72
Problems 73
 4	DOCUMENTATION: RECORDS AND REPORTS	75
Files and Records 77
Construction Progress Record 86
Electronic Record Keeping 86
Construction Reports 87
Construction Diary 90
Who Should Maintain Diaries and Daily Reports? 92
Documentation of Intermittent Inspection 93
Special Feedback Reports 93
Documentation of Dangerous Safety Hazard Warnings 100
Miscellaneous Records 101
Labor Standards Review Records 103
Job Conferences 104
Contractor Submittals 104
Construction Photographs 105
Photographic Equipment and Materials 112
Digital Cameras for Construction 119
Problems 120
 5	ELECTRONIC PROJECT ADMINISTRATION	121
Using Computers for Project Administration 122
Web-Enabled Project Management Applications 137
Problems 142
 6	SPECIFICATIONS AND DRAWINGS	144
What Is a Specification? 144
Conflicts Due to Drawings and Specifications 145
Unenforceable Phrases 147
Content and Component Parts of a Specification 149
What Do the Specifications Mean to the Inspector? 153
CSI Specifications Format--Its Meaning and Importance 154
ASCE Civil Engineering Specifications Format 158
State Highway Department Formats 159
Other Nonstandard Construction Specifications Formats in Use 165
Project Specifications (Project Manual) Versus Special Provisions Concept 166
Inspector Training and Knowledge of Specifications 169
Allowances and Tolerances in Specifications 171
Problems 171
 7	USING THE SPECIFICATIONS IN CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION	173
General Conditions of the Construction Contract 173
International Construction Contracts 175
Differing Site Conditions 179
Materials and Equipment 183
The Contractor and Subcontractors 183
Shop Drawings and Samples 184
Disapproving or Stopping the Work 186
Supplementary General Conditions 188
Technical Provisions of the Specifications 189
Addenda to the Specifications 192
Standard Specifications 193
Master Specifications (Guide Specifications) 194
Special Material and Product Standards 195
Building Codes, Regulations, Ordinances, and Permits 201
Types of Drawings Comprising the Construction Contract 203
Order of Precedence of the Contract Documents 204
Problems 205
 8	CONSTRUCTION LAWS AND LABOR RELATIONS	207
Compliance with Laws and Regulations 207
Public Versus Private Contracts 208
Traffic Requirements During Construction 210
Code Enforcement Agency Requirements 211
Work Within or Adjacent to Navigable Waterways 211
Fair Subcontracting Laws 213
The Hazardous Waste Problem 214
Federal Labor Laws 215
Labor Relations 220
Prejob Labor Agreements 222
Problems 223
 9	CONSTRUCTION SAFETY	224
OSHA and Construction Safety 225
General Responsibility for Construction Safety 227
Owner Participation in the Safety Program 227
Typical Federal, State, and Utility Company Approach 228
Safety Responsibility under Construction Management and Turnkey Contracts 228
Effect of Including Contractor's Safety Obligations in the Specifications 230
Applicability of State and Federal OSHA Provisions to a Project 233
Special Applications 234
Procedural Guidelines 234
Shoring and Bracing 237
The Competent Person 238
Safety Requirements in Construction Contracts 238
Problems 239
10	MEETINGS AND NEGOTIATIONS	240
Types of Meetings in Construction 240
Meeting Resources 242
Handling Yourself at a Meeting 242
Preconstruction Conference 244
In-House Decision-Making Meetings 250
Principles of Negotiation 254
Techniques of Negotiation 257
Problems 261
11	RISK ALLOCATION AND LIABILITY SHARING	263
Risk Management 265
Identification and Nature of Construction Risks 266
Contractual Allocation of Risk 267
Who Should Accept What Risks? 268
Types of Risks and Allocation of Those Risks 270
Minimizing Risks and Mitigating Losses 276
Problems 279
12	PRECONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS	280
Description of Approach 280
Constructability Analysis 281
Advertise and Award Phase 282
Issuance of Bidding Documents 284
Prequalification of Bidders 287
Bonds 287
Liability Forms of Insurance 289
Property Forms of Insurance 291
Opening, Acceptance, and Documentation of Bids 296
Development of a Quality Control or Assurance Program 301
Inspection and Testing Manual 302
Field Office Organization of the Owner or the Field Representative 305
The Preconstruction Conference 311
Study Plans and Specifications 312
Key Dates 312
Listing of Emergency Information 317
Agency Permits 317 
Starting a Project 317
Problems 324
13	PLANNING FOR CONSTRUCTION	327
Construction Schedules as Related to Building Costs 330
Scheduling Methods 330
Bar Charts 333
S-Curve Scheduling or Velocity Diagrams 335
Line-of-Balance Charts 337
Network Diagrams 338
Specifying CPM for a Project 341
Personal Computers for CPM Network Scheduling 345
Computerized Progress Payments 347
Selection of PC Scheduling Software 348
Problems 351
14	FUNDAMENTALS OF CPM CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING	352
CPM: What It Is and What It Does 353
Basic Procedure in Setting Up a CPM Schedule 354
Project Planning 354
Fundamentals of CPM 355
Who Owns Float? 362
Precedence Diagraming vs i-j Diagraming 366
Comparison of Precedence and Arrow Diagraming 368
Precedence Formats 368
Reading a Manual CPM Network Schedule 373
Reading a Computerized CPM Network Schedule 377
Problems 386
15	CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS	390
Authority and Responsibility of All Parties 391
Temporary Facilities Provided by the Contractor 395
Time of Inspection and Tests 396
Contractor Submittals 396
Opening a Project 397
Job Philosophy 398
Administrative Activities 400
Suspension or Termination of the Work 401
Construction Services Cost Monitoring 403
Problems 404
16	VALUE ENGINEERING	406
Definition 411
The Role of the Resident Project Representative 411
Fundamentals of Value Engineering 412
Areas of Opportunity for Value Engineering 413
Methodology in Generating Value Engineering Proposals 417
Field Responsibility in Value Engineering 422
Problems 422
17	MEASUREMENT AND PAYMENT	423
Contracts for Construction 423
Types of Construction Contracts 423
Construction Progress Payments 426
Approval of Payment Requests 426
Basis for Payment Amounts 428
Evaluation of Contractor's Payment Requests 434
Force Account 436
Payment for Extra Work and Change Orders 440
Payment for Mobilization Costs 446
Partial Payments to the Contractor 452
Retainage 455
Liquidated Damages During Construction 459
Standard Contract Provisions for Measurement and Payment 459
Interpreting the Contractor's Bid 460
Measurement for Payment 466
Measurement Guidelines for Determination of Unit-Price Pay Quantities 470
Final Payment to the Contractor 472
Problems 475
18	CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND WORKMANSHIP	477
Materials and Methods of Construction 478
Requests for Substitutions of Materials 479
Access to the Work by Quality Assurance Personnel 483
Inspection of Materials Delivered to the Site 484
Rejection of Faulty Material 485
Construction Equipment and Methods 486
Quality Level and Quality Assurance 491
Quality Assurance Provisions 491
Ownership of Materials 499
Delivery and Storage of Materials 499
Handling of Materials 500
Problems 500
19	CHANGES AND EXTRA WORK	501
Contract Modifications 501
Changes in the Work 502
Types of Changes 508
Elements of a Change Order 512
Evaluating the Need 513
Considerations for Evaluation 514
Change Orders for Differing Site Conditions 515
Starting the Change Order Process 518
Cost of Delays Caused by Change Orders 521
Problems 521
20	CLAIMS AND DISPUTES	522
Five Principles of Contract Administration 522
Construction Problems 524
Protests 524
Claims 525
Claims and Disputes 530
Differences Between the Parties 532
Home Office Overhead 537
Scheduling Changes 544
Constructive Changes 545
Other Causes of Claims and Disputes 546
Resolving Differences 554
Preparations for Claims Defense 557
The Use of Project Records in Litigation 562
Order of Precedence of Contract Documents 563
Obligations of the Contractor 564
Alternative Methods for Dispute Resolution 565
Arbitration or Litigation? 567
The Mediation Process 569
Settlement of Disputes by Arbitration 570
Preliminary Notice of Potential Claim 574
Problems 574
21	PROJECT CLOSEOUT	577
Acceptance of the Work 577
Guarantee Period 578
Contract Time 579
Liquidated Damages for Delay 580
Cleanup 583
The Punch List 585
Preparations for Closeout 590
Completion versus Substantial Completion 597
Substantial Completion versus Beneficial Occupancy or Use 601
Beneficial Use/Partial Utilization 603
Liens and Stop Orders 605
Final Payment and Waiver of Liens 609
Stop Notice Release Bond 609
Post Completion 611
Problems 611
BIBLIOGRAPHY 613
INDEX 619
FORMS INDEX 633
FLOWCHART INDEX 635

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Construction industry -- Management.
Building -- Superintendence.