Table of contents for History out of joint : essays on the use and abuse of history / Sande Cohen.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Part 1: On Reading History
Introduction: Philosophical Prelude--On the Difference Between an Event and a Narrative
One. Nietzsche and 'Last Readers'
The "Hard Case" Called Nietzsche
Genealogy of an Impossible Relation
Why I Read Nietzsche (1)--Last Writing
Language, Visibility, and Intellectuals
Why I Read Nietzsche (2)
Why I Read Nietzsche (3)--The Last Reader
Why I Read Nietzsche (4)
Two. The Los Angeles Times and Taiwan/'One' China
China and Taiwan as Narrative Subjects
Historical Continuity and Discontinuity
The L.A. Times 'Taiwan Policy'
The Editorial and Intellectual Suppression
Conclusion
Three. The Los Angeles Times and Art/Public Intellectuals
Intellectuals and the L.A. Times
Art Criticism and Language
Conclusion
Four. The Image of Historians in Contemporary Society
History and Its Currency
Currency, Image and Role
Images of Goal-Talk and "Master" Historians
Conclusion
Five. Historical Writing and Literary Anecdotes (For Hayden White)
Conceiving the Anecdote
Joel Fineman's Historiographic Theory
A Political Use of the Anecdote
Conclusion
Part 2: Affirmation and the Philosophy of History
Six. Derrida's 'New Scholar': Between Philosophy and History
A Derrida-Effect?
Specters of Marx--Suspending Philosophy and History
The Historiography of Being-Haunted
Haunting and Meta-Metahistory
Historiography Without History
Historiospectography
Conclusion
Seven. Jean-Francois Lyotard and the "Signs of History"
Eight. The Genealogy of History According to Deleuze and Guattari
Speculative Philosophy of History
History and Cultural Schizophrenia
Our Era as Schizophrenic Labor
Some Concluding Remarks
Nine. Nothing Affirmative Ever Dies: An Analysis of Deleuze's Notion of Time and History in
Difference and Repetition
Repetition (Signs)
Difference
Representation
Temporality
Destiny and Subjectivity
Caesura and Becoming
Conclusion
Conclusion
Bibliography

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

History -- Philosophy.
Historiography.
Public history.