Table of contents for An engineer's guide to technical communication / Sheryl A. Sorby, William M. Bulleit.

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Engineer's Guide to Technical Communication
Sheryl A. Sorby and William M. Bulleit
Outline/Table of Contents
1. Introduction
2. 1.1 Importance of communication in engineering	1
 1.2 Philosophy and organization of text	3
 1.3 Communication in the Information Age	4
 1.4 References	7
3. Setting the Stage
1. 2.1 The Writing Process	8
2.1.1 The Writing Process versus the Engineering Design Process	8
2.1.2 Collaborative Writing	19
 2.2 Audience Analysis	24
 	2.2.1 Executives	26
 	2.2.2 Experts in your Field	27
 	2.2.3 Technical People Outside your Field	28
 	2.2.4 Lay Audience	28
 	2.2.5 Combined Audience	30
 	2.2.6 Audience Analysis in Oral Communication	31
 	2.2.7 Audience Profile Sheet	33
 	2.2.8 Summary	33
2.3 Grammar and Style	34
	2.3.1 Grammar	36
	2.3.2 Style	38
2.4 References	49
2.5 Exercises	50
3. Ethical Issues in Technical Communication	52
 3.1 Reporting all Relevant Information Accurately	52
 3.2 Ethics in Personal Communication	55
 3.3 Obtaining Information from Other Sources and Using it Ethically	57
 	3.3.1 Conducting Library Searches	57
 	3.3.2 Conducting Web Searches	60
 	3.3.3 Citing References	68
 3.4 Plagiarism	76
 3.5 References	79
 3.6 Exercises	80
4. Personal Communication	82
	4.1 Letters	82
	4.2 Memos	86
	4.3 Cover Letters and Memos	89
4.4 Electronic Mail	91
4.5 Lists	98
4.6 Exercises	101
5. Document Design	103
5.1 Tool Selection	103
5.2 Fonts	105
5.3 White Space	107
5.4 Headings and Sub-headings	109
5.5 Title Page	111
5.6 Table of Contents	113
5.7 List of Figures	114
5.8 Appendices	115
5.9 Working with Document files	117
5.10 Designing a Web Page	121
5.11 References	128
5.12 Exercises	128
6. Technical Written Communication 	130
6.1 Summarizing Information	130
	6.1.1 Executive Summary	131
	6.1.2 Abstracts	133
	6.1.3 Keywords	135
6.2 Proposing Ideas	137
	6.2.1 Proposals	137
	6.2.2 Proposals Written in Response to an RFP	141
6.3 Reporting Information	142	
	6.3.1 Technical Reports	142
	6.3.2 Experimental Reports	147
	6.3.3 Progress Reports	151
	6.3.4 Technical Papers	153
6.4 Specifying Assembly Instructions	156
	6.4.1 Design Specifications	157
	6.4.2 Assembly Instructions	163
6.5 Including Equations in Technical Documents	166
6.6 References	168
6.7 Exercises	169
2. 7. Communication of Calculations	172
7.1 Tool Selection for Communicating Design Calculations 	173
7.2 Communicating Calculations	174
7.3 Examples	189
7.4 Exercises	194
8. Oral Communication 	196
8.1 Tool Selection for Technical Presentations	196
8.2 Types of Presentations	197
8.3 Formal Individual presentations	199
8.4 Formal Group Presentations	212
8.5 Informal Presentations	216
8.6 Examples	218
8.7 Additional Resources	220
8.8 Exercises	221
	
9. Visual Communication	223
9.1 Tool Selection for Graphics	224
9.2 Representing Data	226
	9.2.1 Common Features of Graphs and Charts	226
	9.2.2 Pie Charts	228
	9.2.3 Bar Charts	230
	9.2.4 Histograms	232
	9.2.5 Line Graphs	235
	9.2.6 Scatter Plots	237
	9.2.7 Tables	239
	9.2.8 Three-Dimensional Charts	242
9.3 Charting Structure	243
	9.3.1 Flow Charts	243
	9.3.2 Organizational charts	245
	9.3.3 Gantt Charts	246
9.4 Portraying Realism	247
	9.4.1 Schematic Drawings	248
	9.4.2 Pictorial Drawings	250
	9.4.3 Photographs	251
9.5 Including Graphics in Documentation	253
9.6 Working with Image Files	258
9.7 References	262
9.8 Exercises	263
		
10. Communication in Job Searches	267
	
10.1 Resumes	267
10.2 Cover Letters	277
10.3 Documents for Electronic Job Searches	279
10.4 Interview Communication	283
10.5 Post-Interview Communication	286
10.6 References	287
10.7 Exercises	287
Appendix-Grammar	288

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Communication in engineering.
Technical writing.