Table of contents for Development across the life span / Robert S. Feldman.

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Contents
Preface 	
PART 1: BEGINNINGS
Chapter 1: Beginnings: An Introduction to Development Across the Lifespan	2
Prologue: A Brave New World	3
Looking Ahead	4
AN ORIENTATION TO LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT	5
Developmental Diversity: How Culture, Ethnicity, and Race Influence Development	11
KEY ISSUES AND QUESTIONS: DETERMINING THE NATURE-AND NURTURE-OF LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT	12
THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT	16
RESEARCH METHODS	30
From Research to Practice: Using Developmental Research to Improve Public Policy 	37
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Evaluating the "Experts"	41
Epilogue	42
Looking Back	43
Key Terms and Concepts	44
Chapter 2: The Start of Life: Genetics and Prenatal Development	46
Prologue: Multiplicity	47
Looking Ahead	48
EARLIEST DEVELOPMENT	48
THE INTERACTION OF HEREDITY AND ENVIRONMENT	60
From Research to Practice: Advancing Gene Therapy: Are We Heading Toward a Clone Age?	61
Developmental Diversity	: Cultural Differences in Physical Arousal: Might a Culture's Philosophical Outlook Be Determined by Genetics?	69
PRENATAL GROWTH AND CHANGE	73
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Optimizing the Prenatal Environment	84
Epilogue	85
Looking Back	86
Key Terms and Concepts	87
Chapter 3: Birth and the Newborn Infant	88
Prologue: A Life Begins Early	89
Looking Ahead	90
BIRTH	90
From Research to Practice: Who Delivers? Childbirth Attendants in the 21st Century	98
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Dealing with Labor	100
BIRTH COMPLICATIONS	101
Careers in Lifespan Development: Diana Hegger, Neonatal Nurse and Educator	106
Developmental Diversity: Overcoming Racial and Cultural Differences in Infant Mortality	108
THE COMPETENT NEWBORN	112
Epilogue	119
Looking Back 	120
Key Terms and Concepts	121
PART 2: INFANCY: FORMING THE FOUNDATIONS OF LIFE
Chapter 4: Physical Development in Infancy	122
Prologue: First Steps	123
Looking Ahead	124
GROWTH AND STABILITY	124
From Research to Practice: SIDS: The Unanticipated Killer	134
MOTOR DEVELOPMENT	135
Developmental Diversity: The Cultural Dimensions of Motor Development	140
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SENSES	147
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Exercising Your Infant's Body and Senses	153
Epilogue	154
Looking Back	154
Key Terms and Concepts	155
Chapter 5: Cognitive Development in Infancy	156
Prologue: The Forgotten Memories of Simona Young	157
Looking Ahead	158
 PIAGET'S APPROACH TO COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT	158
INFORMATION-PROCESSING APPROACHES TO COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT	167
INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN INTELLIGENCE: IS ONE INFANT SMARTER THAN ANOTHER?	171
From Research to Practice: Crib TV	176
THE ROOTS OF LANGUAGE	176
Developmental Diversity: Is Infant-Directed Speech Similar Across All Cultures?	184
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development	: What Can You Do to Promote Infants' Cognitive Development?	186
Epilogue	187
Looking Back	188
Key Terms and Concepts	189
Chapter 6: Social and Personality Development in Infancy	190
Prologue: The Velcro Chronicles	191
Looking Ahead	192
FORMING THE ROOTS OF SOCIABILITY	192
FORMING RELATIONSHIPS	200
Developmental Diversity: Does Attachment Differ Across Cultures?	205
DIFFERENCES AMONG INFANTS	209
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Choosing the Right Infant Care Provider	215
From Research to Practice: How Does Infant Childcare Affect Later Development?	216
Epilogue	218
Looking Back	218
Key Terms and Concepts	219
PART 3: THE PRESCHOOL YEARS
Chapter 7: Physical and Cognitive Development in the Preschool Years	220
Prologue: Aaron	221
Looking Ahead	222
PHYSICAL GROWTH	222
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Keeping Preschoolers Healthy 	233
INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT	235
From Research to Practice: Children's Eyewitness Testimony: Memory on Trial	243
THE GROWTH OF LANGUAGE AND LEARNING	248
Developmental Diversity: Preschools Around the World	255
Careers in Lifespan Development: Robert Recio, Jr., Preschool Teacher	258
Epilogue	259
Looking Back	259
Key Terms and Concepts	261
Chapter 8: Social and Personality Development in the Preschool Years	262
Prologue: The Gathering	263
Looking Ahead	264
FORMING A SENSE OF SELF	264
Developmental Diversity: Developing Racial and Ethnic Awareness	266
FRIENDS AND FAMILY: PRESCHOOLERS' SOCIAL LIVES	272
From Research to Practice: Spanking: Why the Experts Say "No"	282
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Disciplining Children	285
Moral Development and Aggression	286
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Increasing Moral Behavior and Reducing 
Epilogue	296
Looking Back	297
Key Terms and Concepts	299
PART 4: THE MIDDLE CHILDHOOD YEARS
Chapter 9: Physical and Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood	300
Prologue: Suzanne McGuire	301
Looking Ahead	302
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT	302
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Keeping Children Fit	314
INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT	316
SCHOOLING: THE THREE Rs (AND MORE) OF MIDDLE CHILDHOOD	325
Developmental Diversity: Multicultural Education	328
From Research to Practice: Home Schooling: Living Rooms as Classrooms	329
Careers in Lifespan Development: Valerie Patterson, Special Education Teacher	343
Epilogue	345
Looking Back	345
Key Terms and Concepts	347
Chapter 10: Social and Personality Development in Middle Childhood	348
Prologue: Balancing Cultures	349
Looking Ahead	350
THE DEVELOPING SELF	350
Developmental Diversity: Are Children of Immigrant Families Well Adjusted?	356
RELATIONSHIPS: BUILDING FRIENDSHIP IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD	361
From Research to Practice: Stopping the Torment: Dealing with Schoolyard Bullies	367
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Increasing Children's Social Competence	369
FAMILY AND SCHOOL: SHAPING CHILDREN'S BEHAVIOR IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD	370
Developmental Diversity: Explaining Asian Academic Success	379
Epilogue	384
Looking Back	385
Key Terms and Concepts	387
PART 5: ADOLESCENCE
Chapter 11: Physical and Cognitive Development in Adolescence	388
Prologue: Picture of Health	389
Looking Ahead	390
PHYSICAL MATURATION	390
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT AND SCHOOLING	400
From Research to Practice: Violence in Schools 	410
THREATS TO ADOLESCENTS' WELL-BEING	411
Careers in Lifespan Development: Doreen Gail Branch, Substance Abuse Researcher 	413
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Hooked on Drugs or Alcohol?	414
Developmental Diversity: Selling Death: Pushing Smoking to the Less Advantaged	416
Epilogue	419
Looking Back	420
Key Terms and Concepts	421
Chapter 12: Social and Personality Development in Adolescence	422
Prologue: Adolescent Trio	423
Looking Ahead	424
IDENTITY: ASKING "WHO AM I?"	424
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Adolescent Suicide: How to Help	435
RELATIONSHIPS: FAMILY AND FRIENDS	436
Developmental Diversity: Race Segregation: The Great Divide of Adolescence	442
DATING, SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, AND TEENAGE PREGNANCY	447
From Research to Practice: Explaining the Decline in Teen Pregnancy	451
Epilogue	453
Looking Back	454
Key Terms and Concepts	455
PART 6: EARLY ADULTHOOD
Chapter 13: Physical and Cognitive Development in Early Adulthood	456
Prologue: A Tale of Two Students	457
Looking Ahead	458
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND STRESS	458
Developmental Diversity: How Cultural Beliefs Influence Health and Health Care	462
Careers in Lifespan Development: Martin Binks, Behavioral Health Clinician	465
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Coping with Stress	470
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT	472
COLLEGE: PURSUING HIGHER EDUCATION	479
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development:	 When Do College Students Need Professional Help with Their Problems?	483
From Research to Practice: 	Stereotype Threat and Disidentification with School: Do Stereotypes Depress the Academic Performance of African-Americans and Women?	487
Epilogue	489
Looking Back	489
Key Terms and Concepts	491
Chapter 14: Social and Personality Development in Early Adulthood	492
Prologue: Dance	493
Looking Ahead	494
FORGING RELATIONSHIPS: INTIMACY, LIKING, AND LOVING DURING EARLY ADULTHOOD	494
Developmental Diversity: Gay and Lesbian Relationships: Men with Men and Women with Women	506
THE COURSE OF RELATIONSHIPS	507
From Research to Practice: 	Does a Good Marriage Mean a Long Life? The Impact of Marital Quality on Health	511
WORK: CHOOSING AND EMBARKING ON A CAREER	516
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Choosing a Career	521
Epilogue	523
Looking Back	523
Key Terms and Concepts	525
PART 7: MIDDLE ADULTHOOD
Chapter 15: Physical and Cognitive Development in Middle Adulthood	526
Prologue: Fit for Life	527
Looking Ahead	528
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT	528
From Research to Practice: The Dilemma of Hormone Therapy: No Easy Answer	535
HEALTH	536
Developmental Diversity: Individual Variation in Health: Ethnic and Gender Differences	539
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT	547
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Effective Strategies for Remembering	553
Epilogue	554
Looking Back	554
Key Terms and Concepts	557
Chapter 16: Social and Personality Development in Middle Adulthood	558
Prologue: A Winding Journey to Success	559
Looking Ahead	560
PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT	560
Developmental Diversity: Middle Age: In Some Cultures It Doesn't Exist	564
From Research to Practice	From College Yearbook Photo to Midlife Personality: The Stability of Personality in Later Years of Life	567
RELATIONSHIPS: FAMILY IN MIDDLE AGE	568
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Dealing with Spousal Assault	577
WORK AND LEISURE	579
Careers in Lifespan Development: Cathy Goodwin, Career Advisor	582
Developmental Diversity: Immigrants on the Job: Making It in America	582
Epilogue	586
Looking Back	587
Key Terms and Concepts	589
PART 8: LATE ADULTHOOD
Chapter 17: Physical and Cognitive Development in Late Adulthood	590
Prologue: 100 and Counting	591
Looking Ahead	592
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN LATE ADULTHOOD	593
HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN LATE ADULTHOOD	601
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Caring for People with Alzheimer's Disease	605
From Research to Practice: Will Your Attitude Toward Aging Affect Your Life Span?	606
Developmental Diversity: Gender, Race, and Ethnic Differences in Average Life 	Expectancy: Separate Lives, Separate Deaths	612
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN LATE ADULTHOOD	614
Epilogue	619
Looking Back	620
Key Terms and Concepts	621
Chapter 18: Social and Personality Development in Late Adulthood	622
Prologue: Sex, Love, and Nursing Homes	623
Looking Ahead	624
PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT AND SUCCESSFUL AGING	624
Developmental Diversity: How Culture Shapes the Way We Treat People in Late Adulthood	630
THE DAILY LIFE OF LATE ADULTHOOD	636
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Planning For-and Living-a Good Retirement	642
RELATIONSHIPS: OLD AND NEW	643
From Research to Practice: Life After Death: Adjusting to the Loss of a Spouse	648
Epilogue	653
Looking Back	653
Key Terms and Concepts	655
PART 9: ENDINGS
Chapter 19: Endings: Death and Dying	656
Prologue: Choosing Death	657
Looking Ahead	658
DYING AND DEATH ACROSS THE LIFESPAN	658
Developmental Diversity: Differing Conceptions of Death	663
CONFRONTING DEATH	666
From Research to Practice: 	Comfort for the Dying: Palliative Care as an Alternative to Aggressive Treatment	673
Careers in Lifespan Development: Dina C. Bianga, Hospice Nurse	675
GRIEF AND BEREAVEMENT	675
Becoming an Informed Consumer of Development: Helping a Child Cope with Grief	679
Epilogue	680
Looking Back	680
Key Terms and Concepts	681
Glossary
References
Acknowledgments
Name Index
Subject Index
Preface
This book tells a story: the story of our lives, and our parents' lives, and the lives of our children. It is the story of human beings and how they get to be the way they are.
Unlike any other area of study, lifespan development speaks to us in a very personal sense. It covers the range of human existence from its beginnings at conception to its inevitable ending at death. It is a discipline that deals with ideas and concepts and theories, but one that above all has at its heart people-our fathers and mothers, our friends and acquaintances, our very selves. 	Development Across the Life Span seeks to capture the discipline in a way that sparks and nurtures and shapes readers' interest. It is meant to excite students about the field, to draw them into its way of looking at the world, and to build their understanding of developmental issues. By exposing readers to both the current content and the promise inherent in lifespan development, the text is designed to keep interest in the discipline alive long after students' formal study of the field has ended.
Overview of the Fourth Edition
Development Across the Life Span, Fourth Edition-like its predecessors-provides a broad overview of the field of human development. It covers the entire range of the human life, from the moment of conception through death. The text furnishes a broad, comprehensive introduction to the field, covering basic theories and research findings, as well as highlighting current applications outside the laboratory. It covers the life span chronologically, encompassing the prenatal period, infancy and toddlerhood, the preschool years, middle childhood, adolescence, early and middle adulthood, and late adulthood. Within these periods, it focuses on physical, cognitive, and social and personality development.
The book seeks to accomplish the following four major goals:
* 	First and foremost, the book is designed to provide a broad, balanced overview of the field of lifespan development. It introduces readers to the theories, research, and applications that constitute the discipline, examining both the traditional areas of the field as well as more recent innovations. It pays particular attention to the applications developed by lifespan development specialists, demonstrating how lifespan developmentalists use theory, research, and applications to help solve significant social problems.
* 	The second goal of the text is to explicitly tie development to students' lives. Findings from the study of lifespan development have a significant degree of relevance to students, and this text illustrates how these findings can be applied in a meaningful, practical sense. Applications are presented in a contemporaneous framework, including current news items, timely world events, and contemporary uses of lifespan development that draw readers into the field. Numerous descriptive scenarios and vignettes reflect everyday situations in people's lives, explaining how they relate to the field.
* The third goal is to highlight both the commonalities and diversity of today's multicultural society. Consequently, the book incorporates material relevant to diversity in all its forms-racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and cultural diversity-throughout every chapter. In addition, every chapter has at least one "Developmental Diversity" section. These features explicitly consider how cultural factors relevant to development both unite and diversify our contemporary, global society.
* 	Finally, the fourth goal is one that is implicit in the other three: making the field of lifespan development engaging, accessible, and interesting to students. Lifespan development is a joy both to study and teach, because so much of it has direct, immediate meaning to our lives. Because all of us are involved in our own developmental paths, we are tied in very personal ways to the content areas covered by the book. Development Across the Life Span, then, is meant to engage and nurture this interest, planting a seed that will develop and flourish throughout readers' lifetimes.
In accomplishing these goals, the book strives to be user-friendly. Written in a direct, conversational voice, it replicates as much as possible a dialogue between author and student. The text is meant to be understood and mastered on its own by students of every level of interest and motivation. To that end, it includes a variety of pedagogical features that promote mastery of the material and encourage critical thinking. In short, the book blends and integrates theory, research, and applications, focusing on the breadth of human development. Furthermore, rather than attempting to provide a detailed historical record of the field, it focuses on the here-and-now, drawing on the past where appropriate, but with a view toward delineating the field as it now stands and the directions toward which it is evolving. Similarly, while providing descriptions of classic studies, the emphasis is more on current research findings and trends.
Development Across the Life Span is meant to be a book that readers will want to keep in their own personal libraries, one that they will take off the shelf when considering problems related to that most intriguing of questions: How do people come to be the way they are?
What's New in the Fourth Edition?
The fourth edition of Development Across the Life Span has been extensively revised in response to the comments of dozens of reviewers. Among the major changes are the following:
Additions of New and Updated Material
The revision incorporates a significant amount of new and updated information. For instance, advances in such areas as behavioral genetics, brain development, evolutionary perspectives, and cross-cultural approaches to development receive expanded and new coverage. Overall, more than a thousand new citations have been added, with most of those from articles and books published in the last three years.
New topics were added to every chapter. The following sample of new and revised topics featured in this edition provides a good indication of the currency of the revision:
Chapter 1
Cognitive neuroscience
Gain and loss principles
Social construction 
Neo-Piagetian approaches
Chapter 2
Sex selection
Turner's syndrome
Gene therapy
Infertility findings
Intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) 
Zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT)
Chapter 3
Post-partum depressionDoula
Chapter 4
Cross-national data on breast-feeding
Dynamic systems theory
SIDS
Chapter 5
Neuroscience of memory
Autobiographical memory in infants
Television viewing in infancy
Chapter 6
Brain development and emotions
MAX-facial expressions in infants
Child care effects
Biological bases of temperament
Chapter 7
False memories/abuse
Memory and culture
Vygotsky and gender roles
APA recommendations on restricting advertising targeting children
Chapter 8
Relational and instrumental aggression
Limbic system changes due to abuse
Spanking
Video games and aggression
Autism and theory of mind
False belief task and theory of mind
Chapter 9
New conclusions regarding teaching of reading
Safety in cyberspace
Culture and growth
Psychological disorders
Home schooling
Chapter 10
Self-esteem and race
Bullying
Children of gay and lesbian parents
Measurement of status
Families and race
Chapter 11
Myelination and gray matter
Exercise, obesity, and race
School violence
School dropout rate
Addiction
Chapter 12
MAMA cycle
Gender differences in self-esteem
Explaining the decline in teen pregnancy
Bisexuality
Transgenderism
Chapter 13
Disidentification with school
Coping
Psychological problems of college students
Sinnott's work on postformal thought
Maturational reform hypothesis
Chapter 14
Health benefits of marriage
Cohabitation
Gay and lesbian marriage
Chapter 15
Erectile dysfunction and treatment
Hormone therapy
Chapter 16
Immigrants
Cultural views of middle age
Caregiving to older generation
Stability of personality
Chapter 17
Psychological disorders in late adulthood
AIDS 
Relationship of exercise and brain development 
Attitudes toward aging and length of life
Chapter 18
Job discrimination
Positive emotions
Emotion regulation
Internet dating
Adjustment to widowhood
Chapter 19
Palliative care
Native American conceptions of death
Oregon assisted suicide law
Revisions to Foster Student Critical Thinking and Mastery of the Material
In order to help students master the material and think critically about it, a number of subtle changes were made to this edition to reinforce the existing features:
* 	Critical thinking questions in From Research to Practice boxes. Two critical thinking questions were added at the end of each box, helping students to think more deeply about the material and to make connections between the material in the box and students' lives.
* Review and Apply questions. Interspersed throughout each chapter are several short recaps of the chapters' main points, followed by questions designed to provoke critical thinking and applications of the material to child development. In this edition, at least one question asks readers to take the perspective of someone working in an occupation that relies on findings of lifespan development, including the fields of health care, education, and social work.
Ancillaries
Development Across the Life Span, Fourth Edition is accompanied by a superb set of teaching and learning materials.
For the Instructor:
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For the Student:
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Acknowledgments
I am grateful to the following reviewers who provided a wealth of comments, constructive criticism, and encouragement:
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Many others deserve a great deal of thanks. I am indebted to the many people who provided me with a superb education, first at Wesleyan University and later at the University of Wisconsin. Specifically, Karl Scheibe played a pivotal role in my undergraduate education, and the late Vernon Allen acted as mentor and guide through my graduate years. It was in graduate school that I learned about development, being exposed to such experts as Ross Parke, John Balling, Joel Levin, Herb Klausmeier, and many others. My education continued when I became a professor. I am especially grateful to my colleagues at the University of Massachusetts, who make the university such a wonderful place in which to teach and do research.
Several people played central roles in the development of this book. Edward Murphy brought a keen intelligence and editorial eye to the process. John Bickford provided research assistance, and I am thankful for his help. Most of all, John Graiff was essential in juggling and coordinating the multiple aspects of writing a book, and I am very grateful for the substantial role he played.
I am also grateful to the superb Prentice Hall team that was instrumental in the inception and development of this book. Jennifer Gilliland, Senior Editor, vigilantly watched over the project, demonstrating a rare level of insight and creativity. Stephanie Johnson coordinated the editorial process, and Leah Jewell stood behind the project. I am grateful for their support. Leslie Carr, development editor, provided a wealth of valuable input, and the book is much improved by her thoughtful contributions. On the production end of things, xxxx xxxxxxxxx, the production supervisor, and xxxxxx xxxxxxxx, photo editor, helped in giving the book its distinctive look. Finally, I'd like to thank (in advance) marketing manager xxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx, on whose skills I'm counting. I also wish to acknowledge the members of my family, who play such a pivotal role in my life. My brother, Michael, my sisters-in-law and brother-in-law, my nieces and nephews, all make up an important part of my life. In addition, I am always indebted to the older generation of my family, who led the way in a manner I can only hope to emulate. I will always be obligated to Ethel Radler, Harry Brochstein, and the late Mary Vorwerk. Most of all, the list is headed by my father, the late Saul Feldman, and my mother, Leah Brochstein.
In the end, it is my immediate family who deserve the greatest thanks. My terrific kids, Jonathan (and his wife, Leigh), Joshua, and Sarah, not only are nice, smart, and good-looking, but my pride and joy. And ultimately my wife, Katherine Vorwerk, provides the love and grounding that makes everything worthwhile. I thank them, with all my love.
Robert S. Feldman
University of Massachusetts at Amherst
About the Author
Robert S. Feldman is professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he is Director of Undergraduate Studies and recipient of the College Distinguished Teacher Award. He is both a Hewlett Teaching Fellow and a Senior Online Teaching Fellow at UMass.
Professor Feldman was educated as an undergraduate at Wesleyan University, from which he graduated with High Honors, and received a M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he specialized in social and developmental psychology. Among his more than 100 books, chapters, and articles, he has edited Development of Nonverbal Behavior in Children (Springer-Verlag), Applications of Nonverbal Behavioral Theory and Research (Erlbaum), and co-edited Fundamentals of Nonverbal Behavior (Cambridge University Press). He is the recipient of grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of the Disabilities and Rehabilitation Research, which have supported his research on the development of nonverbal behavior in children. A past Fulbright lecturer and research scholar, he is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and American Psychological Society.
During the course of nearly two decades as a college instructor, he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses at Mount Holyoke College, Wesleyan University, Virginia Commonwealth University, in addition to the University of Massachusetts.
Professor Feldman loves music, is an enthusiastic pianist, and is an excellent cook. He has three children, and he and his wife, a psychologist, live in Amherst, Massachusetts, in a home overlooking the Holyoke mountain range.
Special Features
Development Across the Life Span, Fourth Edition
CHAPTER-OPENING PROLOGUES
Each chapter begins with a short vignette, describing an individual or situation that is relevant to the basic developmental issues being addressed in the chapter. For instance, the chapter on birth describes a premature birth; one of the chapters on adolescence provides accounts of three teenagers; and a chapter on late adulthood discusses turning 100.
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LOOKING AHEAD SECTIONS
These opening sections orient readers to the topics to be covered, bridging the opening prologue with the remainder of the chapter and providing orienting questions.
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 FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE
Each chapter includes a section that describes current developmental research or research issues, applied to everyday problems. For instance, these sections include discussions of the use spanking, stereotypes and academic performance of women and African Americans, and comforting the dying.
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DEVELOPMENTAL DIVERSITY
Every chapter has at least one "Developmental Diversity" section incorporated into the text. These sections highlight issues relevant to today's multicultural society. Examples of these sections include discussions preschools around the world, gay and lesbian relationships, the marketing of cigarettes to the less advantaged, and race, gender, and ethnic differences in life expectancy.
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BECOMING AN INFORMED CONSUMER OF DEVELOPMENT
Every chapter includes information on specific uses that can be derived from research conducted by developmental investigators. For instance, the text provides concrete information on how to encourage children to become more physically active, help troubled adolescents who might be contemplating suicide, and planning and living a good retirement.
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CAREERS IN LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT
Many chapters include an interview with a person working in a field that uses the findings of lifespan development. Among those interviewed are a toy designer, career advisor, and hospice nurse.
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REVIEW AND APPLY SECTIONS
Interspersed throughout each chapter are three short recaps of the chapters' main points, followed by questions designed to provoke critical thinking.
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RUNNING GLOSSARY
Key terms are defined in the margins of the page on which the term is presented.
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END-OF-CHAPTER MATERIAL
Each chapter ends with an Epilogue that refers back to the opening Prologue, a numbered summary, and a list of key terms and concepts. This material is designed to help students study and retain the information in the chapter.
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Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Developmental psychology -- Textbooks.