Table of contents for Postmodern rationality, social criticism, and religion / by Henry L. Ruf.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS	xiii
CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION	1
I.	Locating Texts in Historical Time	9
II. 	Dialogue in a Pluralistic World	12
III. 	Ordinary People in Dialogue with Texts by Intellectual "Experts"	15
IV. 	Defending a Postmodern Interpretation of Rationality Itself	19
V. 	Institutionalized Obstacles to Reading Postmodern Texts Dialogically 	27
CHAPTER TWO THE DEBATE BETWEEN MODERNISM AND POSTMODERNISM	33
I. 	What Is the Modernism that Postmodernism Opposes?	37
II. 	Early Postmodern Criticisms of Modernism	50
A.	Kierkegaard's and Nietzsche's Existential Rejections of Metaphysical Explanations		50
B. 	Classical Pragmatism's Rejection of Modernist Theories of Knowledge	62
III. 	Modernist Counterattacks with "Sciences of Meaning" 	73
IV. 	Postmodernist Social and Historical Interpretations of Language 	88
A. 	Wittgenstein's Dissolution of Modernist Problems with Meaning	89
B. 	Heidegger's Descriptions of Experiential Meaning 	100
C. 	Postmodernism as Poststructuralism	112
V. 	Derrida's Deconstruction of Modernist Theories of Signs	113
VI. 	Foucault's Interpretation of Discourse	120
VII.	Neopragmatism's Challenges to Modernist Theories	125
CHAPTER THREE POSTMODERNISM'S PASSION 
FOR PERSONAL FREEDOM AND BEAUTY	137
I. 	Postmodernism's Appropriation of Earlier Freedom Fighters	139
II. 	Kierkegaard as Social/Cultural Critic	154
III. 	Nietzsche's Critique of Social/Cultural Barriers to Free Life	171
IV. 	Heidegger on Revolutionizing Decadent Western Culture	184
V. 	Foucault's Ethic of Self-Discipline in the Practice of Freedom	203
VI. 	Zizek on Working through Our Cravings for Unity and Enjoyment 	206
CHAPTER FOUR POSTMODERNISM'S RESISTANCE 
TO SOCIAL OPPRESSION AND DOMINATION	221
I. 	A Postmodernist Marxist Call for the Democratization of Economic Practices	222
II. 	Postmodernist Elements in Habermas's Search for a Democratizing of Governmental Policymaking	241
III. 	Foucault's Challenge for Local Resistance to the Social Practices Making 
	Domination Possible	259
IV. 	American Intellectual Freedom Fighters	274
A. 	Alvin Gouldner		275
B. 	Iris Marion Young		280
C.	bell hooks		286
D. 	Lucius Outlaw and Michael Eric Dyson	288
E. 	Cornell West		290
CHAPTER FIVE POSTMODERNIST INTERPRETATIONS 
OF FAITHFULNESS TO RELIGIOUS ENCOUNTERS	299
I.	Kierkegaard on Faithful Response to the Invasion of the Nonrational 
	Infinite into the Rational Finite	302
II.	Levinas on the Priority of Ethical Face-to-Face Interpersonal Encounters to 
	Social Practices	308
III. 	Zizek on Revolutionary Christianity	326
IV. 	A Postmodernist Interpretation of Buddhist and Mystic Traditions	331
A.	Mark Taylor on Sacred Alterity and a Divine Milieu	331
B. 	Huston Smith on the God of Mysticism as the Necessary Condition for Everything Finite		344
V. 	A Postmodern Fusion of Pragmatic Rationality and Existential Religion: A Wittgensteinian Interpretation of Everyday Religious Discourse	358
NOTES	377
BIBLIOGRAPHY	435
GLOSSARY	453
INDEX	463

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Postmodernism.
Pragmatism.
Religion and sociology.
Religion and science.