Table of contents for Romanticism : an Oxford guide / edited by Nicholas Roe.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

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Detailed contents
List of illustrations xxiii
List of contributors xxiv
 Introduction Nicholas Roe 1
Events 1
Then and now 2
Romantic history to Romantic literature 4
Chronology 6
Wordsworth takes over 7
Romantic inheritances 8
Everything and nothing 8
Vanishings 9
Changes 10
Now and then 10
 Part I Romantic orientations 13
 1 The historical context Simon Bainbridge 15
Revolution 15
War 17
Nationalism 20
Empire and slavery 22
Democracy, protest, and reform 23
Further reading 25
 2 The literary background Jane Stabler 27
The sublime 27
Sensibility 29
Shakespeare 31
Satire 33
The south 35
Further reading 36
 3 Classical inheritances Bruce E. Graver 38
The rise of historical criticism 39
Romantic Hellenism 41
Romantic pastoral 45
Further reading 48
 4 Sensibility Adela Pinch 49
Cultural change 50
Philosophy and science 51
Politics 52
An international movement 54
Gender 55
Poetry 56
The novel 58
Further reading 59
Web link 60
 5 The visual arts and music Stephen C. Behrendt 62
British art and Romanticism 64
John Constable and the characterization of nature 66
William Blake's interdisciplinary art 68
J. M. W. Turner and the directions of Romantic art 70
The caricature print 71
Some notes on sculpture 72
British music 73
`Popular' music 74
Further reading 75
 6 Print culture and the book trade John Barnard 77
Radical publishing 78
New books 81
Libraries 83
Cheap print 85
Newspapers and periodicals 85
The reprint trade 86
Reading and writing: a case history 86
Readers 87
Further reading 88
 7 Science Tim Fulford 90
Geology 91
Botany 92
Joseph Priestley and Humphry Davy 93
Medicine 96
Race 97
Astronomy 98
Technology 99
`Scientist' 99
Further reading 100
 8 Philosophy and religion Alan Gregory 102
Immanuel Kant 103
Schleiermacher and the experience of religion 104
Beyond understanding: Coleridge on the imagination 106
Shelley: after Jupiter 108
Enthusiasm: the witness of the spirit 109
Further reading 112
 9 England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales Fiona Stafford 114
Crossing borders 116
The influence of England 118
The power of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales 121
Further reading 123
10 Europe Christoph Bode 126
The continental scene—Germany 128
France 130
Spain and Italy 131
Poland and Russia 133
Family likenesses and the unity of opposites 134
Further reading 136
11 Easts Nigel Leask 137
The great map of mankind 138
Orientalism: theory and history 138
Eighteenth-century orientalism and Sir William Jones 140
Footnotes 142
Desire and quest romance 144
Oriental infections 146
Further reading 147
12 Americas Susan Manning 149
The promise of the new 150
British Romanticism in America 150
Romantic exploration 151
American utopias 152
Transcendentalism and its antagonists 154
New World Gothic 156
Encountering others 158
History and romance 159
Further reading 161
 Part II Reading Romanticism 163
13 New Historicism Kenneth R. Johnston 165
Definitions, origins, and problems 166
The characteristics of current New Historicism 167
A short backwards history of Romantic New Historicism 171
READING: William Wordsworth, `Tintern Abbey' 176
Further reading 180
14 Feminism Anne K. Mellor 182
History 182
Themes 185
The development of the self 185
The relation of human beings to nature 187
Politics 188
Aesthetic theory and genre 190
READING: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice 193
Further reading 197
15 Ecology James C. McKusick 199
Ecological approaches to British Romantic literature 200
The Lake Poets: William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge 201
Green language: Robert Bloomfield and John Clare 203
The return of the nightingale: Charlotte Smith and John Keats 205
The end of nature: William Blake, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron 207
The Romantic origins of environmentalism 209
READING: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, `The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere' 211
The albatross as emissary 211
Creatures of the great calm 212
Archaic words and the conservation of language 214
Further reading 216
16 Psychoanalysis Andrew Michael Roberts 219
Knowledge 220
Desire 223
Fantasy 225
Self 227
READING: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus 230
Repression in the family 230
The fantasy of omnipotence 232
Creativity and the return of the repressed 233
Further reading 234
17 Post-colonialism Deirdre Coleman 237
What does `post-colonial' mean? 239
Slavery and the Romantic imagination 241
Bringing slavery home 243
Domesticity and empire 246
READING: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano 249
Literary influences 252
Further reading 254
18 Formalism Richard Cronin 257
Were the Romantics formalists? 258
Form and power: the case of the sonnet 261
The Coleridgean solution 264
READINGS 265
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, `Kubla Khan' 265
John Keats, `Ode on a Grecian Urn' 268
Further reading 271
Part III Romantic forms 273
19 Romantic forms: an introduction Michael O'Neill 275
Romantic epic (and a note on Romantic fragments) 276
Drama 279
Lyric 281
Poetic narrative, including romance 283
Gender and genre in Romantic poetry 285
READINGS 286
William Wordsworth, The Prelude 286
John Keats, `Ode to a Nightingale' 287
Lord Byron, Beppo 289
Further reading 290
20 The sonnet David Fairer 292
The sonnet form and its development 293
The sonnet revival 294
The sonnet, sensibility, and the self 296
Friendship and the heart 298
The public voice of liberty 299
Strength and stillness 301
READINGS 303
Charlotte Smith, `To the Moon' 303
William Wordsworth, `Prefatory Sonnet' 304
William Wordsworth, `London, 1802' 305
Leigh Hunt, `On a Lock of Milton's Hair' 306
John Keats, `On the Grasshopper and the Cricket' 307
Percy Bysshe Shelley, `England in 1819' 308
Further reading 309
Web link 309
21 Lyric Paul D. Sheats 310
Broadening possibilities 311
The resonant lyre 311
Language in action: lyric as drama 313
Vision quests 315
Representing the self 318
Lyric communities 320
READINGS 323
James Fordyce, `To Spring' 323
William Blake, `To Spring' 324
John Keats, `Ode on a Grecian Urn' 325
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, `This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison' 327
Further reading 330
22 Epic Lynda Pratt 332
What is an epic? 333
A short history of epic 334
Epic revival 335
Diversity 337
Gender 338
Politics 339
Ambivalence 341
READING: John Keats, Hyperion 345
Further reading 347
23 Narrative poetry Peter Vassallo 350
Narrative revival 350
Byron's poetic `romaunt' 353
`The Italian strain' 354
Leigh Hunt's The Story of Rimini 357
The Orient 358
READING: John Keats, Isabella; or, the Pot of Basil 362
Further reading 367
24 The novel Corinna Russell 368
Origins and directions 371
Genre and subgenres 375
The narrator in the Romantic-period novel 377
READINGS 381
Fanny Burney, Evelina; or the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World 381
Evelina makes an Entrance 381
Evelina as a Romantic-period novel 382
Sir Walter Scott, Waverley; or, 'Tis Sixty Years Since 384
`The romance of his life' and `real history' 384
The pleasures of the past 386
Further reading 387
25 Satire Steven E. Jones 390
Novels and prose satires 390
The theatre 393
Reviews and pamphlets 394
Graphic prints 397
Poetry 398
READING: Lord Byron, Don Juan 401
Don Juan as satiric novel in verse 402
Don Juan as pantomimic satire 403
Don Juan, pamphlet satires, and graphical prints 404
Further reading 406
Web link 407
26 Romantic drama Judith Pascoe 409
The repertoire 411
Joanna Baillie's Plays on the Passions 412
The pursuit of novelty 413
The theatres 415
Star turns 416
READING: Elizabeth Craven, The Miniature Picture 418
Dangling affections 418
The traffic in pictures 419
A late winter's tale 421
Further reading 423
27 Essays, newspapers, and magazines William Christie 426
Newspapers 427
Magazines 429
Reviews 431
The periodical essay 433
READING: William Hazlitt, `My First Acquaintance with Poets' 437
First acquaintance with Coleridge 438
`An archangel a little damaged' 439
A history of the growth of Hazlitt's mind 440
The anticlimax of history 440
The vanity of human wishes 441
Further reading 443
28 Biography and autobiography Anthony Harding 445
Social, economic, and cultural context 446
Individualism, natural rights, and life-writing 448
Biography: lives in contention 449
Autobiography: confession, self-exploration, self-making 452
The centrality of life-writing in the Romantic period 454
READING: William Godwin, Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman 456
Reshaping Mary Wollstonecraft's public image 456
Becoming an author 456
The champion of women 458
Love, marriage, and death 459
Further reading 460
29 Romance Greg Kucich 463
The origins of romance 464
The progress of romance 467
The Romanticism in romance 470
READINGS 475
Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage 475
Leigh Hunt, The Story of Rimini 478
Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria; or, The Wrongs of Woman 479
Further reading 480
30 Gothic Nicola Trott 482
Gothic nationalism 482
Gothic aesthetic 483
Gothic (anti-)modernity 484
Gothic (anti-)rationality 485
Gothic taboos 487
Gothic genres 488
Gothic criticism 489
READINGS 492
Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto 492
Ann Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest 493
Matthew Gregory Lewis, The Monk 495
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus 497
Further reading 499
Web links 500
31 The fragment Sophie Thomas 502
Fragments, fashion, and fakery 503
The ruin and the unfinished 504
Aesthetic and antiquarian contexts 507
Responses 508
Form or genre? 510
The afterlife of the Romantic fragment 512
READING: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, `Kubla Khan' 514
Part or whole? 514
The preface 515
The poem 517
Further reading 519
32 Forgeries Debbie Lee 521
Poetic forgeries 522
Medical hoaxes 524
Travel lies 526
Exotic others 528
READING: John Hatfield and the Lake Poets 531
Hatfield's identities 531
Coleridge's identities 532
Imposture in the Lake District 533
Further reading 536
33 Non-fictional prose John Whale 538
Aesthetics and politics: politics and aesthetics 541
Edmund Burke's Reflections 541
Responses to Burke 542
Reading discursively 545
READINGS 548
William Hazlitt, `The Indian Jugglers' 548
Leigh Hunt, `On the Realities of Imagination' 550
Further reading 553
34 Travel writing Carl Thompson 555
A `tour-writing and tour-publishing age' 557
Explorers: the business of scientific discovery 560
Survivors, missionaries, and other travellers 562
Romanticism and Romantic-era travel writing 562
Travel writing and Romantic-era literature 564
READING: Mungo Park, Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa 567
Exploration, commerce, and colonialism 567
Suffering and sentiment 569
The explorer in Romantic-era culture 571
Further reading 572
35 Letters, journals, and diaries Nichola Deane 574
Popular myths and images 575
Critical problems 577
Letter-writing 579
Journals, diaries, and notebooks 580
READINGS 583
Letters of Jane Austen 583
Letters of John Keats 584
Dorothy Wordsworth, Grasmere Journal 585
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Notebooks 587
Further reading 588
Part IV Romantic afterlives 591
36 Literary criticism and theory Seamus Perry 593
The fascination of what's natural 593
Feeling and wonder 595
Ordinary language 598
Egotism and imagination 600
Current questions 603
Further reading 605
37 Poetry Charles J. Rzepka 607
Plain style: Robert Frost 608
Wordsworth and Anglo-American modernism 609
The Anglophone world 611
On his native shores 612
Two second selves: Charles Tomlinson and Elizabeth Bishop 613
Recompenses 616
Further reading 618
38 The nineteenth- and twentieth-century novel Michael Herbert 620
The Brontës 621
The American tradition: Moby-Dick 623
D. H. Lawrence 626
Further reading 629
39 Film Jerrold E. Hogle 631
The Romantic poem on screen 632
Romantic film biography 633
Films on the birth of a Romantic classic 635
Filming the origins of Romanticism 638
Further reading 640
Web links 640
40 The theatre Julie A. Carlson 642
Upstaging Prometheus 643
Lord, Byron 646
Hideous stage progeny: Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus 648
Afterlife now: Romanticism unbound; or `cut' 650
Further reading 652
41 The idea of the author Andrew Bennett 654
Lives of the poets 655
Inventing the author 657
Posterity 658
Genius, originality, inspiration 659
Craze 661
Further reading 663
42 Modernism and postmodernity Edward Larrissy 665
Modernist debts to Romanticism 666
Modern Romantics 668
Later Romantics 669
Modern constructions of Romanticism 670
Postmodernity and postmodernism 671
Further reading 674
43 Politics Peter J. Kitson 675
A Romantic ideology? 675
A green Romanticism? 676
Radicals or reactionaries? 677
Nationalism, imperialism, and orientalism 680
Romanticism and racism 682
Further reading 684
44 Sciences Marilyn Gaull 686
Normal science 687
Geology 688
Astronomy 691
Sciences of life 692
Further reading 694
45 Environmentalism Timothy Morton 696
The Romantic legacy 696
Industrial society and its discontents 697
Romantic consumerism, green consumerism 701
Ecological criticism 702
Further reading 706
46 Romanticism in the electronic age David S. Miall 708
Text analysis 709
Digital editions 711
Text encoding 714
Romanticism on the Internet 714
Learning how 716
Further reading 717
Web Links 718
Index 721

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

English literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
English literature -- 18th century -- History and criticism -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Romanticism -- Great Britain -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.