Table of contents for Handbook of youth mentoring / edited by David L. DuBois, Michael J. Karcher.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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 [p. v, TOC]
Foreword
Preface
Dedication
PART I. INTRODUCTION
1. Youth Mentoring: Theory, Research, and Practice
David L. DuBois and Michael J. Karcher
PART II. CONCEPTS, FRAMEWORKS, AND FOUNDATIONS
2. Mentoring in Historical Perspective
David B. Baker and Colleen P. Maguire
3. A Model of Youth Mentoring
Jean E. Rhodes
4. Research Methodology
David L. DuBois and Naida Silverthorn
5. Toward a Typology of Mentoring
Cynthia L. Sipe
PART III. MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS
6. The Stages and Development of Mentoring Relationships
Thomas E. Keller
7. Assessment of Mentoring Relationships
Michael J. Nakkula and John T. Harris
8. A Psychotherapy/Counseling Perspective on Mentoring Relationships
Renée Spencer and Jean E. Rhodes
9. Mentoring Relationships and Social Support
Manuel Barrera, Jr., and Darya D. Bonds
10. Natural Mentoring Relationships
Marc A. Zimmerman, Jeffrey B. Bingenheimer, and Diana E. Behrendt
PART IV. DEVELOPMENTAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
11. Mentoring Children
Timothy A. Cavell and Anne-Marie Smith
12. Mentoring Adolescents
Nancy Darling
13. Race and Ethnicity in Mentoring Relationships
Bernadette S nchez and Yarí Colón
14. Gender in Mentoring Relationships
G. Anne Bogat and Belle Liang
PART V. FORMAL MENTORING PROGRAMS
15. Developing a Mentoring Program
Susan G. Weinberger
16. Recruiting and Sustaining Volunteer Mentors
Arthur A. Stukas and Chris Tanti
17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mentoring Programs
Jean B. Grossman
18. Cross-Age Peer Mentoring
Michael J. Karcher
19. Intergenerational Mentoring
Andrea S. Taylor, Leonard LoSciuto, and Lorraine Porcellini
20. E-Mentoring
Hugh Miller and Mark Griffiths
21. Integration of Mentoring With Other Programs and Services
Gabriel P. Kuperminc, James G. Emshoff, Michele N. Reiner, Laura A. Secrest, Phyllis Holditch Niolon, and Jennifer D. Foster
PART VI. CONTEXTS OF MENTORING
22. Schools
Sharon G. Portwood and Penny M. Ayers
23. Work and Service-Learning
Mary Agnes Hamilton and Stephen F. Hamilton
24. After-School Programs
Barton J. Hirsch and Vivian Wong
25. Religious Organizations
Kenneth I. Maton, Mariano R. Sto. Domingo, and Jacqueline King
26. International: U.K. and Europe
Kristin Liab?, Patricia Lucas, and Helen Roberts
27. International: Australia and New Zealand
Ian M. Evans, Anna Jory, and Narelle Dawson
PART VII. SPECIAL POPULATIONS
28. Talented and Gifted
Carolyn M. Callahan and Robin M. Kyburg
29. Academically At-Risk Students
Simon Larose and George M. Tarabulsy
30. Juvenile Offenders
Elaine A. Blechman and Jedediah Bopp
31. Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents
Lynn Blinn-Pike
32. Abused and Neglected Youth
Preston A. Britner and Lisa Kraimer-Rickaby
33. Youth With Disabilities
Katherine McDonald, Fabricio Balcazar, and Christopher Keys
PART VIII. POLICY ISSUES
34. Youth Mentoring and Public Policy
Gary Walker
35. Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses
Brian T. Yates
36. Mentoring for Results: Accountability at Individual, Program, Community, and Policy Levels
Shawn M. Coyne, Jennifer L. Duffy, and Abraham Wandersman
Author Index
Subject Index
About the Editors
About the Contributors

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Youth -- Counseling of -- United States.
Mentoring -- United States.
Youth development -- United States.
Social work with youth -- United States.