Table of contents for Comparative law in a global context : the legal systems of Asia and Africa / Werner Menski.

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Contents
Preface 15
List of abbreviations 23
Part I Comparative theoretical framework 25
Introduction:
Globalisation and Asian and African legal systems 26
1 Comparative law and legal theory from a global perspective 1391
1.1 The culture-specific nature of law and respect for difference 78
1.2 Changing global scenario: From colonial transplant to ethnic
implant 96
1.2.1 International law and its unifying pressures 99
1.2.2 Comparative law as a harmonising handmaiden 113
1.2.3 Assumptions about uniformity: Legal transplants and
reception of laws 121
1.2.4 Southern voices: From polite silence to
postcolonial re-assertion 128
1.3 New globalisation: Reverse colonisation and ethnic implants 134
1.4 Good practice in comparative law 151
1.5 World legal history 161
1.6 A model of global, plurifocal legal education 170
2 Legal pluralism in legal theory and comparative law 207
2.1 Early conceptualisations of legal pluralism 213
2.2 The historical school of law 217
2.3 Early legal pluralism: Ehrlich's 'living law' 225
2.4 Reluctant pluralism: Hart's primary and secondary rules 236
2.5 Postmodern' theories of legal pluralism 246
2.5.1 Moore's concept of the 'semi-autonomous' social field 248
2.5.2 Allott's three perspectives on law 255
2.5.3 Griffiths' theory of legal pluralism 266
2.5.4 Chiba's tripartite model of law 277
3 Comparative jurisprudence: Images and reflections of law 309
3.1 Traditional natural law theories in outline 313
3.2 Greek legal philosophy 319
3.3 Roman legal philosophy 327
3.4 Early and later medieval developments in Church law 332
3.5 Re-evaluation of natural law during Renaissance and
Reformation 340
3.6 Legal positivism 348
3.7 Beyond positivism 365
3.7.1 Socio-legal approaches 367
3.7.2 New natural law theories 380
3.8 A global working definition of law 389
Part II Regional comparisons in a global context 443
4 Hindu law: The search for appropriateness 449
4.1 A historical and conceptual overview 457
4.2 The pre-classical stage: Vedic law (c. 1500 BC to
c. 500 BC) 464
4.3 Classical Hindu law (c. 500 BC to c. 200 AD) 474
4.4 Late classical Hindu law (c. 500 BC to c. 1100 AD) 500
4.5 Post-classical Hindu law (after 1100) 524
4.6 Medieval Hindu law under Muslim domination 530
4.7 Anglo-Hindu law 535
4.8 Modern Hindu family law in India 555
4.9 Hindu legal concepts and the Indian Constitution 571
4.10Searching for composite appropriateness in
postmodernity 600
5 Muslim law: God's law or men's law? 642
5.1 Understanding Islamic law from a legal pluralist
perspective 645
5.2 The Qur'anic base and its application 661
5.3 The Prophet's roles: Leader, judge and guide 671
5.4 Early Islamic law after the Prophet's death 678
5.5 Legal developments in the early Muslim empire: The
Umayyads 686
5.6 Scholar-jurists and the Abbasids 698
5.7 The central role of jurists 704
5.7.1 Schools of law and competing doctrines 705
5.7.2 Shafi'i scheme to unify Muslim jurisprudence 710
5.7.3 Hadith collections and the 'Schacht controversy' 719
5.8 Continuing diversities after Shafi'i 728
5.9 Judicial administration: Qadis and muftis 739
5.10Subsidiary sources of law 746
5.11The purported closing of the 'gates of ijtihad' 757
5.12The shift towards legal reforms 768
5.13Turkey as a secular Muslim country 788
5.14Pakistani law and islamisation 811
6 African law: The search for law 871
6.1 The denial of African culture and laws 881
6.2 The search for African law and legal theory 890
6.3 The nature of traditional African laws 918
6.3.1 Reflections of early knowledge 918
6.3.2 African worldviews and their conceptual
implications 924
6.3.3 African religions and socio-ritual processes 934
6.3.4 African customary law as a self-controlling
system 950
6.3.5 Dispute settlement processes in pre-colonial
Africa 976
6.4 African laws under colonial rule 993
6.4.1 The process of colonisation 996
6.4.2 The colonial impact on African customary
systems 1012
6.4.3 The colonial impact on dispute settlement
processes 1023
6.5 African laws in the post-colonial period 1033
6.5.1 The continuing devaluation of African traditions 1037
6.5.2 Debates about custom in modern African laws 1043
6.5.3 Dispute settlement and the problems of finding justice 1057
6.5.4 The unification debate as a tool for
nation-building 1063
6.6 The future 1072
7 Chinese law: Code and conduct 1120
7.1 Scholarly representations of Chinese laws 1124
7.2 Traditional Chinese worldviews in their social and legal context1136
7.2.1 The cosmic dimension: Tao 1137
7.2.2 Self-controlled order, Chinese style: Li 1142
7.2.3 The social context of
traditional Chinese legal regulation 1156
7.2.4 The place of customary laws 1167
7.3 The classical Chinese legal system: Codes and what else? 1172
7.3.1 Historical overview of codification in China 1173
7.3.2 The conceptual emphasis on penal law 1176
7.3.3 The key concept of fa and the influence of
legalism 1180
7.3.4 Confucianisation of the law 1192
7.4 The practical application of the law 1198
7.4.1 The imperial code system as a formal framework 1200
7.4.2 The Emperor as Son of Heaven 1204
7.4.3 The imperial legal machinery 1211
7.4.4 Avoidance of the law 1221
7.4.5 Social and ritual differentiation in the law 1238
7.5 Post-imperial Chinese legal systems 1248
7.5.1 Resistance towards modernising reforms 1249
7.5.2 Introduction of Western laws in the Republican period 1254
7.5.3 The communist foundations of Chinese law 1259
7.6 Law in the People's Republic of China 1265
7.6.1 The ambivalent approach to law in Mao's China 1267
7.6.2 The post-Maoist reconstruction of Chinese law 1284
7.6.3 New legal structures and the future 1295
Concluding analysis: Towards global legal realism 1340
Table of cases and statutes 1384
Bibliographies 1391
Index and glossary 000

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Comparative law.
Law -- Philosophy.