Table of contents for Transnational cinema : the film reader / edited by Elizabeth Ezra and Terry Rowden.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

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Transnational Cinema: The Film Reader
Contents
 
Acknowledgments
Introduction: What is Transnational Cinema? by Elizabeth Ezra and Terry Rowden
Introduction to Section I: From National to Transnational Cinema
Chapter 1. Andrew Higson, ?The Limiting Imagination of National Cinema? from 
Cinema and Nation, eds. Mette Hjort and Scott Mackenzie (London and New York: 
Routledge 2000), pp. 63-74.
Chapter 2. David Murphy, ?Africans Filming Africa: Questioning Theories of an 
Authentic African Cinema.? Journal of African Cultural Studies 13, No. 2, December 
2000, pp. 239-49. 
Chapter 3. Ella Shohat, "Post-Third-Worldist Culture: Gender, Nation, and the 
Cinema" from Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures, eds. Jacqui 
Alexander and Chandra T. Mohanty (London and New York: Routledge 1996), pp. 
183-209. 
Chapter 4. Jigna Desai, "Bombay Boys and Girls: Transnational Gender and Sexual 
Politics in the New Indian Cinema in English" from South Asian Popular Culture 1, 
No. 1, April 2003, pp. 45-61.
Introduction to Section II: Global Cinema in the Digital Age
Chapter 5. Robert E. Davis, "The Instantaneous Worldwide Release: Coming Soon to 
Everyone, Everywhere" from West Virginia University Philological Papers, Vol. 49, 
2002-2003; pp. 110-16. 
Chapter 6. Elana Shefrin, "Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, and Participatory Fandom: 
Mapping New Congruencies Between the Internet and Media Entertainment 
Culture" from Critical Studies in Media Communication 21, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 
261-81. 
Chapter 7. John Hess and Patricia R. Zimmermann, "Transnational Documentary: A 
Manifesto" from an earlier version published in Afterimage 1997 (February): pp. 10-
14. 
Introduction to Section III: Motion Pictures: Film, Migration, and 
Diaspora
Chapter 8. Hamid Naficy, ?Situating Accented Cinema? from An Accented Cinema: 
Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking, Princeton University Press, 2001, pp. 10-39. 
Chapter 9. Peter Bloom, "Beur Cinema and the Politics of Location: French 
Immigration Politics and the Naming of a Film Movement" from Social Identities 
5, No. 4, December 1999, pp. 469-87. 
Chapter 10. David Desser, "Diaspora and National Identity: Exporting 'China' 
through the Hong Kong Cinema" from Post Script: Essays in Film and the Humanities 
20, Nos. 2-3, Winter/Spring/Summer 2001, pp. 124-36. 
Chapter 11. Ann Marie Stock, "Migrancy and the Latin American Cinemascape: 
Towards a Post-National Critical Praxis" from Revista Canadiense De Estudios 
Hispanicos 20, No. 1, Fall 1995, pp. 19-30. 
Introduction to Section IV: Tourists and Terrorists
Chapter 12. Diane Negra, " Romance And/As Tourism: Heritage Whiteness and the 
(Inter)National Imaginary in the New Woman's Film? from Keyframes: Popular 
Cinema and Cultural Studies, Routledge, 2001, pp. 82-97. 
Chapter 13. John S. Nelson, ?Four Forms for Terrorism: Horror, Dystopia, Thriller, 
and Noir? from Poroi 2, No. 1, August 2003. 
Chapter 14. Homi K. Bhabha, "Terror and After. . ." from Parallax 8, No. 1, January-
March 2002, pp. 3-4.

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Motion pictures.