Table of contents for Alzheimer's disease : the dignity within : a handbook for caregivers, family, and friends / Patricia R. Callone ... [et al.].

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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										xv
Contents
Dedication......................................................................
................................................v
Epigraph........................................................................
.................................................vii
PrefaceÉ.. 
................................................................................
.......................................ix
Acknowledgments 
................................................................................
.........................xiii
About the IllustrationsÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ..xix 
Part I. Being a Caregiver: Challenges and Solutions
Meet Patricia (Pat) Callone, MA, MRE 
.....................................................................1
The Special Journey of Caregivers to Persons with Alzheimer's Disease
or Related Dementia
Persons with Alzheimer's Disease 
........................................................................3
Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Families 
.........................................4
Stresses for the 
Caregiver.......................................................................
...............5
Early-to-Mild Stage of Alzheimer's Disease 
.......................................................6
Moderate Stage of Alzheimer's Disease 
...............................................................7
Severe Stage of Alzheimer's 
Disease....................................................................8
A Dozen Tips for Caregivers
1. Consider Your Strengths as a Caregiver 
....................................................11
2. Consider the Strengths of Others 
...............................................................12
3. Evaluate Your Activities 
..............................................................................13
4. Deal with Hurt 
................................................................................
.............14
5. Handle Anger and 
Guilt...........................................................................
.....15
6. Find Ways to Relax . . . And Discipline Yourself to Do 
Them..........................16
7. Keep Friends Close; They Will Give You Energy to Keep Going ..............17
8. Being Responsible vs. Responsive 
...............................................................18
9. Accept Life's Frailties 
................................................................................
..19
10. Reflect on a "Patient's Bill of Rights" 
.........................................................20
11. Create Your Personal "Advisory Board" 
.....................................................21
										xvi
12. Nurture What Remains 
................................................................................
.22
About Dementia
Chart: A Caregiver's Perspective: 
Preserved Skills That Can Be Nourished During Disease ProgressionÉÉÉÉ.25 
Part II. The Reluctant Caregiver: A Husband and Wife's Personal Story
Meet Carl J. Pfeifer, D. Min.
Meet Janaan Manternach, D. Min. 
Twelve Questions and Answers
How do I balance my identity as wife and caregiver?
How do I handle being constantly interrupted?
How can I strengthen my resolve to take the time to listen when my husband is 
trying to 
communicate, in order to give him the dignity he deserves?
What strategies can I use to enable my husband to be ready to go somewhere 
within a certain time 
frame?
How can we become comfortable telling others openly and freely that my loved one 
has 
Alzheimer's disease?
How can I mature into a willingness to do what needs to be done to protect and 
enhance my loved 
one's dignity?
How do I reckon with the fact that my constant concern and preoccupation with 
the vagaries of 
the disease keep me in a constant need of more rest?
What do I do with the guilt I feel when my responses are genuinely noncaring or 
reveal a denial 
of what is happening in the person I'm caring for?
How do I keep loving the person who is, in many ways, no longer the spouse I 
fell in love with?
How do we deal with social situations in which the person with Alzheimer's 
disease can't 
participate?
What do I do with the resentment I feel about having to take over all the tasks 
and jobs that used 
to be my loved one's responsibilities?
What are some ways that I can remember that God is with and for both of us every 
minute of 
every day?
										xvii
Part III. True Stories: Relationships between Persons Affected by the Disease,
Their Caregivers, Family Members, and Friends
Meet Connie Kudlacek, B.S. 
................................................................................
..27
Reading the Stories 
................................................................................
.................30
Summary 
Page............................................................................
.............................31
1. Why Can't Mother Remember? 
...................................................................32
2. How Can He Be So Insensitive? 
..................................................................34
3. Is This the Person I 
Married?......................................................................36
4. Is It Okay If I Don't Tell the Truth? 
...........................................................38
5. How Should We Handle the News that It's 
Dementia?.............................40
6. How Do I know If Something Is Wrong? 
....................................................42
7. Would My Mother become Violent with Her Own Sister? 
........................44
8. Who Has Power of 
Attorney?......................................................................4
6
9. Whose Rights Prevail? 
................................................................................
.48
10. Where Are the Keys? 
................................................................................
..50
11. Who Comes First? 
................................................................................
........52
12. Who Does the 
Changing?.......................................................................
.....54
13. How Was I to 
Know?...........................................................................
.......56
14. Is There Caregiver Abuse? 
...........................................................................58
15. Should a Caregiver Be On Call 24/7? 
.........................................................60
16. Should We Use Restraints or Medication; What Is the Priority?..............62
17. How Do I Know It's Not Just Old Age? 
......................................................64
18. Who Needs Help; The Caregiver or the Person with Dementia?............66
19. Can You Accept Me for Who I Am Today? 
...............................................68
20. To Hold On or Let Go? 
..........................................................................70
Part IV. Caregiving Styles: Three Ways to Respond
Meet Barbara C. Vasiloff, 
M.A.............................................................................
.73
Discover Your Preferred Style 
............................................................................75
The "You" Style 
(#1)............................................................................
.............76
The "We" Style (#2) 
................................................................................
...........78
				
										xviii
The I style (#3) 
................................................................................
................80
Learning Which Style Fits Best
Early-to-Mild 
Stage...........................................................................
.................85
Moderate 
Stage...........................................................................
.........................86
Severe Stage 
................................................................................
........................87
Part V. Alzheimer's Disease: Changes in the Brain
Meet Roger A. Brumback, M.D. 
...........................................................................89
A Dialogue with Dr. Roger A. Brumback
Doesn't everyone get senile as they get older? 
..............................................91
What is dementia? 
................................................................................
...............92
Is it true that some things are only done by certain parts of the 
brain?...............94
What happens in the brain of the person diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease?.95
As the disease progresses from the early-to-mild stage what happens in the 
brain? ..........97
What happens as the disease progresses toward the moderate stage of 
Alzheimer's?................98
What happens as the disease progresses into the severe stage of Alzheimer's? 99
What actually causes Alzheimer's disease? 
......................................................101
Is it true that the disease can actually go undetected for many 
years?..............101
Is Alzheimer's disease more common than it used to 
be?.................................103
How long does it take people to die of Alzheimer's 
disease?...........................104
Is there any treatment for Alzheimer's disease? 
...............................................104
What is the medical treatment for Alzheimer's disease? 
..................................104
What is supportive treatment for Alzheimer's disease? 
....................................105
Chart: A Doctor's Perspective:
Timeline of Preserved Skills in Stages of Disease ProgressionÉÉÉ.............106
Appendix 1 Additional Information about the 
Brain...................................................109
Appendix 2 Self-Assessment: How Healthy Is Your Brain? 
......................................115
NotesÉÉ.........................................................................
..................................................117
Comments and Suggestions 
................................................................................
............119

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Alzheimer's disease -- Patients -- Care -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Alzheimer's disease -- Patients -- Family relationships -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Caregivers -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.