Table of contents for The birth of science : ancient times to 1699 / Ray Spangenburg and Diane K. Moser.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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CONTENTS
Preface												ix
Acknowledgments										xvi
Introduction											xvii
Section One	PRECURSORS OF SCIENCE: 
FROM ANCIENT TIMES TO THE MIDDLE AGES			1
1. Ancient Peoples-Observation, Measurement, and Mythology			1
Time and Place: About 500 B.C.E. in Greece						3
Babylonia and Egypt									4
The Ancient Greeks: New Ways of Looking at Things				8
Aristotle-And "Why Things Happen"						19
2. From Aristotle to the High Middle Ages (322 B.C.E.-1449 C.E.)			24
Archimedes and Direct Observation							24
Women in Science: Mathematics-Not Just for Men					27
The Cosmos										28
Side Roads of Science: Astrology and Its Roots					29
Hipparchus										31
The Rise of Islamic Science								34
The Scholastics: Frozen in Time							38
Growth of Science in India and China						42
Section Two	THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 46
3. The Universe Turned Outside-In: Copernicus, Tycho, and Kepler			46
Copernicus and the Birth of a Revolution						47
Tycho Brahe: Observer of the Stars							55
Johannes Kepler and the Elliptical Orbit						59
Legacy of a Triad									63
4. A "Vast and Most Excellent Science": Galileo and the Beginnings of Method	65
William Gilbert: Pioneer of Experimental Science					69
Discovering Laws of Motion								73
The Telescope: Seeing Is Believing							76
Lippershey and Invention of the Telescope (1608)					77
Women in Science: The Missing Astronomers					80
Giordano Bruno: Martyr for Science?						85
Argument and Capitulation: The Trial						87
5. Boyle, Chemistry and Boyle's Law							90
Chemistry's Beginnings								90
Genius of County Cork								92
Shared Knowledge									94
An Absence of Gases									96
Understanding Gases									97
Building Blocks of Chemistry: Methods and Elements				98
6. Newton, the Laws of Motion, and the "Newtonian Revolution"			100
The Great Synthesizer									101
Fontenelle: The First Professional Popular Science Writer				107
Three Laws of Motion								109
The Nature of Light									112
Sir Isaac Newton, Hero of an Age							113
Section Three	THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION IN THE LIFE SCIENCES		116
7. The Anatomists: From Vesalius to Fabricius						116
Galen's Mixed Legacy								117
Vesalius the Anatomist								120
The Seeds of Change									125
8. Paracelsus, Pharmaceuticals, and Medicine						127
Paracelsus, the Physician								129
Paracelsus, the Alchemist								131
Sanctorius (Santorio Santorio)							135
9. The Heart of the Matter									136
Early Ideas about Blood								136
Big Ideas in a Small Book								140
Harvey and Animal Reproduction							145
Blood and Air										148
10. The Amazing Microscopic World							151
Malpighi and the Capillary								152
Grew Views Plant Structure								154
Giovanni Borelli and the Mechanical Body						156
Swammerdam: A Close Look at Insects 						159
Hooke, Master Illustrator								160
Leeuwenhoek's Tiny "Wretched Beasties"						161
11. Understanding the Diversity of Life							168
The Vegetable Lamb on a Stalk							173	
Francesco Redi and Spontaneous Generation					177
Konrad Gesner, Natural Historian							179
Fossils											181
John Ray and the Species Concept							183
Section Four	SCIENCE, SOCIETY, AND THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION	185
12. The 17th Century: A Time of Transition						185
John Dee: Scientist and Magician							185
Royal Intrigues									190
A Time of Intertwined Beliefs							199
Secrecy and Power									202
CONCLUSION										205
Chronology											209
Glossary											225
Further Reading and Websites								231
Index												239




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Science History Juvenile literature, Science History