Table of contents for Language strategies for bilingual families : the one-parent-one-language approach / Suzanne Barron-Hauwaert.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Chapter Index
INTRODUCTION	5
1. ABOUT THE BOOK	5
2. THE ORGANISATION OF THE BOOK	7
3. THE STUDY AND PARENTS' CONTRIBUTION TO THIS BOOK	9
4. MY BACKGROUND	10
NOTES:	11
CHAPTER 1: THE ONE-PARENT-ONE LANGUAGE APPROACH. WHAT IS IT?	12
PART ONE: THE ORIGINS OF THE OPOL APPROACH - MAURICE GRAMMONT AND HIS ADVICE TO RONJAT
	12
FROM GRAMMONT TO OPOL...	14
RESEARCH DONE ON CHILD BILINGUALISM	15
WHAT THE PARENTS THINK ABOUT OPOL...	17
PART TWO: MIXING AND CODE-SWITCHING WITHIN THE OPOL APPROACH	21
MIXING AND CODE-SWITCHING AND PARENTAL ACCEPTANCE.	23
PARENTAL LANGUAGE USE WITH THEIR CHILDREN	24
WHAT DO THE PARENTS THINK ABOUT MIXING...?	28
SUMMARY	31
CHAPTER 2: THE FIRST THREE YEARS AND ESTABLISHING THE ONE-PARENT-ONE 
LANGUAGE APPROACH	33
PART ONE: VERY YOUNG CHILDREN AND LANGUAGE LEARNING.	33
BONDING AND TALKING TO A NEW BABY IN TWO LANGUAGES - MOTHERESE AND FATHERESE.	35
CONSISTENT LANGUAGE USE AT HOME	36
GETTING ADVICE AND INCREASING EXPOSURE TO ONE LANGUAGE	37
PART TWO: STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT AND THE EMERGING BILINGUAL	39
LANGUAGE DIFFERENTIATION - 'MUMMY SAYS 'MILK, PAPA DIT LAIT'	40
LANGUAGE REFUSAL AND RELUCTANCE TO TALK IN YOUNG CHILDREN	42
THE FALSE MONOLINGUAL STRATEGY	44
SUMMARY	48
CHAPTER 3: STARTING SCHOOL AND BECOMING BICULTURAL - ONE-CULTURE-ONE-
PERSON?	54
PART ONE: THE PARENT'S CHOICE OF SCHOOL	54
MONOLINGUAL SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT	56
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT	57
HOMEWORK	58
FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES IN A PARENTAL LANGUAGE OR A THIRD LANGUAGE	59
GENDER DIFFERENCES	60
THE EFFECT OF THE PEER GROUP	63
PART TWO: THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF THE PARENTS	65
IMPORTANCE OF CULTURE FOR THE PARENTS	67
BICULTURAL IDENTITY AND ANOMIE	71
HOW OUR CHILDREN REACTED TO GROWING UP WITH TWO (OR MORE) CULTURES	73
SUMMARY	74
CHAPTER 4: INTERACTION BETWEEN FAMILY MEMBERS AND THE ONE-PERSON-ONE 
LANGUAGE APPROACH	81
PART ONE: CONVERSATIONS WITH BOTH PARENTS AND THE CHILDREN	81
LINGUISTIC ABILITY OF THE PARENTS	86
PART TWO: GRANDPARENTS AND THEIR SUPPORT	88
GRANDPARENTS AND THEIR LINGUISTIC ROLE	89
WHAT PARENTS SAID ABOUT THEIR EXTENDED FAMILY	90
PART THREE: STUDIES ON SIBLINGS	96
SIBLINGS AND THEIR USE OF LANGUAGE TOGETHER	98
EFFECT ON LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY BY HAVING A SIBLING	99
COUSINS AND SAME-AGE FRIENDS	101
PART FOUR: COMMUNICATION WITH THE OUTSIDE WORLD AND VISITORS.	103
WHAT THE PARENTS SAID ABOUT GROUP LANGUAGE USE...	104
SUMMARY	106
CHAPTER 5: ONE-PARENT-ONE LANGUAGE FAMILIES - EXPECTATIONS AND THE 
REALITY	111
PART ONE: AN IDEAL WORLD VERSUS THE REALITY OF THE OPOL FAMILY	111
THE PARENTS BELIEFS ABOUT BILINGUALISM	113
ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES	114
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MOTHERS AND FATHERS	117
THE PRESTIGE VALUE OF ONE LANGUAGE	120
PART TWO: TESTING TIMES FOR THE BILINGUAL FAMILY	123
FEELING ISOLATED AND EXCLUDED WITHIN THE FAMILY	123
ONE-PARENT FAMILIES	126
SPEECH PROBLEMS	128
SUMMARY	129
CHAPTER 6: LIVING WITH THREE OR MORE LANGUAGES...ONE-PARENT-TWO (OR MORE) 
LANGUAGES.	136
PART TWO: DEFINING TRILINGUALISM AND MULTILINGUALISM	136
TRILINGUAL FAMILY CASE STUDIES	138
AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL STUDIES	141
PARENT'S VIEWPOINTS OF BEING PART OF A MULTILINGUAL FAMILY	142
WHAT DO THE PARENTS THINK ABOUT TRILINGUALISM?	143
PART TWO: 1999 SURVEY: ISSUES SURROUNDING MULTILINGUAL FAMILIES:	146
RESULTS OF TRILINGUAL FAMILY SURVEY 1999:	147
(A)	DOMINANT LANGUAGES WITHIN THE FAMILY: COUNTRY-LANGUAGE V FAMILY-LANGUAGE.	148
(B) LANGUAGE USE WITHIN THE HOME	149
(C) EDUCATION OF THE TRILINGUAL CHILD	150
(D) LIVING WITH THREE CULTURES	151
CONCLUSIONS: ONE PARENT-TWO LANGUAGES (OR MORE...)	152
SUMMARY	154
CHAPTER 7: - SEVEN STRATEGIES FOR LANGUAGE USE WITHIN THE FAMILY	160
PART ONE: THE PARENTS OPTIONS WITHIN THE FAMILY	160
1. OPOL - ML (MAJORITY LANGUAGE STRONGEST)	162
2. OPOL - ML (MINORITY LANGUAGE SUPPORTED BY THE OTHER PARENT)	164
3. MINORITY LANGUAGE AT HOME ([email protected])	165
4.TRILINGUAL STRATEGY	166
5. MIXED STRATEGY	168
6.TIME AND PLACE STRATEGY	170
7. THE 'ARTIFICIAL' OR 'NON-NATIVE' STRATEGY	172
PART TWO: CHANGING STRATEGIES TO SUIT THE CIRCUMSTANCES	173
THE PARENT'S CHOICE OF STRATEGY	174
THE PARENT'S COMMENTS REGARDING CHANGING STRATEGIES.	176
SUMMARY	178
CHAPTER 8: THE ONE-PARENT-ONE LANGUAGE APPROACH IN THE 21ST CENTURY.	186
FROM GRAMMONT AND OPOL - A HUNDRED YEARS ON	186
ALLOW SOME MIXING AT YOUNG AGE AND ENCOURAGE LATER CODE-SWITCHING	186
CONSISTENT OPOL IN THE EARLY YEARS	186
THE POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF SCHOOL AND PEER PRESSURE ON LANGUAGE USE	187
EXTENDED FAMILY INVOLVEMENT AND GAINING THEIR SUPPORT	187
TRILINGUAL AND MULTILINGUAL FAMILIES	188
PARENTS AS ROLE MODELS	188
CHOOSE A STRATEGY TO SUPPORT THE MINORITY LANGUAGE	188
OPOL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY	189
THE OPOL APPROACH FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: 10 KEY POINTS TO THINK ABOUT	190
APPENDIX 1: STUDIES ON BILINGUAL CHILDREN	192
APPENDIX 2: THE 2001 OPOL QUESTIONAIRE	193
APPENDIX 3 - PARENT'S NATIONALITIES AND COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE	197
APPENDIX 4 - CASE STUDY FAMILIES LIST	198
SOURCES OF INFORMATION FOR BILINGUAL FAMILIES	199
GLOSSARY:	200
REFERENCES	204
GRAPHS, FIGURES AND TABLES IN THE BOOK	211
 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Bilingualism in children, Family Language