Table of contents for Samurai, warfare & the state in early medieval Japan / Karl F. Friday.


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Table of Contents
List of figures 	v
Acknowledgements 	vi
Introduction 	1
1. The Meaning of War 	39
The Concept of Just War 	40
Private War 	46
Feuding & Self-help 	55
Ritual War 	60
Conclusion 	63
2. The Organization of War 	73
Hired Swords & Franchise Armies 	77
Equilibrium & Revolution 	88
The Kamakura Vassal Corps 	90
Officers & the Chain of Command 	98
Warriors & Warbands 	104
Conclusion 	118
3. The Tools of War 	139
Manufacture & Procurement of Weapons 	140
Projectile Weapons 	147
Shock Weapons 	160
Protective Weapons 	177
Horses & Tack 	187
Conclusion 	192
4. The Science of War 	221
The Way of the Horse & Bow 	223
Shaping Battle 	236
Ambushes & Raids 	241
Fortifications & Strongholds 	248
New Wine in Old Bottles 	261
Conclusion 	270
5. The Culture of War 	290
Reputation, Honor & Warrior Personality 	293
Deception, Guile & Surprise 	297
Battle Cries & Self-Introduction 	307
Prisoners of War 	313
Head Hunting 	317
Non-Combatants 	323
Conclusion 	333
Epilog 	347
Notes 	
Bibliography 	357
Index 	432
List of figures 
Figure 2.1. Chains of command in the provincial military and police system of the 11th and 12th 
centuries 	88
Figure 2.2. Yoritomo's Chain of Command	99
Figure 2.3. Chains of Command in the Late Kamakura Military/Police System	104
Figure 3.1. Japanese bow designs in cross section	149
Figure 3.2. Bow oscillation	151
Figure 3.3. Early medieval arrows	152
Figure 3.4. Ebira (left) and Utsubo (right)	152
Figure 3.5. Artist's conception of an oyumi (left); and Roman ballistae (right)	
Figure 3.6. (left to right) Warabite katana, kenuki-gata warabite katana, kenuki-gata katana, 
kenuki-gata tachi and tachi	166
Figure 3.7. Sword shapes in cross-section	168
Figure 3.8. Methods of forging Japanese swords	171
Figure 3.9. Naginata and kumade	173
Figure 3.10. (left to right) Hoko, yari and naginata blades	176
Figure 3.11. Japanese shields	178
Figure 3.12. The components of Japanese armors	179
Figure 3.13. Construction of oyoroi	181
Figure 3.14. Mounted warrior in oyoroi	185
Figure 3.15. Haramaki	186
Figure 3.16. Hara-ate	186
Figure 3.17. Domaru	187
Figure 3.18. Medieval Japanese saddle and tack	190
Figure 3.19. Japanese stirrups	191
Figure 4.1. Possible angles of attack for mounted archery encounters	234
Figure 4.2. Maneuver options for subsequent passes	235
Figure 4.3. Akashi Sadaaki's night attack on Urumayakata	244
Figure 4.4. A mid-twelfth-century warrior residence	251
Figure 4.5. Sakamogi	255
Figure 4.6. A yagura & kaidate	257
Figure 5.1. Warriors collecting a head	319
Figure 5.2. Heads collected and displayed on the battlefield	319
Figure 5.3. Warriors and Kebiishi officers transporting a captured head through the streets of 
the capital	319
Figure 5.4. Presentation of heads	320
 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Japan History, Military To 1868, Samurai History