Table of contents for Bats of the Rocky Mountain West : natural history, ecology, and conservation / Rick A. Adams.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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CONTENTS
Acknowledgments
I. Introduction
A powerful misunderstanding
How much do we know?
Origin of "batness"
The structure of bats
Bats today
"Seeing" in complete darkness
Echolocation: seeing with ears is not as easy as it sounds
Echolocation pulse rates: speed kills
CF versus FM bats: changing the channel is not optional
Nature's arm-race: the insects fight back
The world-wide importance of bats
An unfortunate loss of biodiversity
II. Physiography and Zoogeography of the Rocky Mountain Region
Northern, Central, and Southern Rockies
Geology
Hydrology
Climate
Vegetation & Life Zones
Desertscrub
Desertscrub and bats
Semidesert scrublands
Piñon-juniper woodland
Semidesert scrub, piñon-juniper woodlands and bats
Chaparral
Chaparral and bats
Plains and desert grasslands
Grasslands and bats
Montane shrubland
Montane shrubland and bats
Montane forest
Montane forest and bats
Subalpine Forest
Subalpine forest and bats
Alpine tundra
Alpine tundra and bats
Riparian systems
Riparian systems and bats
Transition Zones
North versus South-Facing Slopes
Barriers to dispersal
North-South corridors: the Canadian/Mexican connection
III. Evolutionary Origins of Rocky Mountain Bats
Bat origins: what do fossils say?
North American bat fauna: mysterious origins
Divergence of temperate from tropical forms: some like it not so hot
Today's Temperate Bats
Special adaptations to temperate environments: when heaven freezes over
Torpor
Hibernation
Migration
IV. Bats in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems
Ecosystems of the Rockies: hotbeds of biodiversity
Bat Diversity & Elevation: It's lonely at the top and the bottom
Community structure of Rocky Mountain bats
The shapes of bats: round pegs in round holes
Shapes and sizes of wings: fitting in with the crowd
Aerial versus gleaning insectivory: how picky should one be?
The shapes and sizes of ears: better hearing or just plain cool
Bats as natural insecticides: balancing the diet
Other foraging modes: bats that really suck
Water: simply a drink, or mineral sink?
Potential competitors: poorwills, rich bats, and sneaky mice
V. Rocky Mountain Bat Conservation Strategies
Where do bats occur?
Mountains: their effect on and importance to conservation efforts
Protecting roost sites
Protecting foraging habitat
Importance of old-growth forests
Protecting water resources
Environmental contaminants and bats
Wind turbines & communication towers
Human-made structures and bats
Bat houses: do they work?
The future of bats.
Accounts of Species
Key to the Bats of the Rocky Mountains
A. FAMILY MORMOOPIDAE
1. Ghost-faces Bat (Mormoops megalophylla)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
B. FAMILY PHYLLOSTOMIDAE
1. California Leaf-nosed Bat (Macrotus californicus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
2. Mexican Long-tongued Bat (Choeronycteris mexicana)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
3. Lesser Long-nosed Bat (Leptonyceris curasoae)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
C. FAMILY VESPERTILIONIDAE
1. Pallid bat (Antrozous pallidus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
2. Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
3. Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
4. Spotted bat (Euderma maculatum)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
5. Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
6. Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
7. Western red bat (Lasiurus blossevillii)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
8. Eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
9. Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
10. Western yellow bat (Lasiurus xanthinus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
13. Southwestern bat (Myotis auriculus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
14. California myotis (Myotis californicus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
15. Western small-footed myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
16. Western long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
17. Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
18. Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
19. Fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
20. Cave myotis (Myotis velifer)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
21. Long-legged myotis (Myotis volans)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
22. Yuma myotis (Myotis yumanensis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
11. Western Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus hesperus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
12. Eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
D. FAMILY MOLOSSIDAE
1. Greater Mastiff Bat (Eumops perotis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
2. Underwood's Mastiff Bat (Eumops underwoodi)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
3. Pocketed free-tailed bat (Nyctinomops femorosaccus)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
4. Big Free-tailed Bat (Nyctinomops macrotis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
5. Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)
a. Description
b. Distribution
c. Ecology & Behavior
d. Reproduction & Development
References
Selected General References
Selected References: Chapter I
Selected References: Chapter II
Selected References: Chapter III
Selected References: Chapter IV
Selected References: Chapter V
Selected References: Accounts of Species
Appendix A. Bat Conservation Programs
United Nations Environmental Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre
The Red List: the 2000 IUNC Red List of Threatened Species
United States Federally Listed endangered bat species
State agency conservation efforts and listings
Arizona
New Mexico
Colorado
Utah
State Nongame Programs
Arizona
Wyoming
Colorado
Idaho
Montana
Utah
New Mexico
Rankings by Natural Heritage Programs: imperiled bat species
International Conservation Efforts for Bats
Coalition of North American Bat Working Groups
Western Bat Working Group
Mexican Bat Working Group
Rocky Mountain State Working Groups and Other Regional Nonprofits
Utah Bat Working Group
Colorado Bat Working Group
Colorado Bat Society
Arizona Bat Resource Group
Wyoming Bat Working Group
Appendix B: Agency reports by state
Arizona
Colorado
New Mexico
Utah
Wyoming
Idaho
Montana
Dissertations and thesis on rocky mountain bats
Glossary
Index
 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Bats Rocky Mountains Region